All Black side to play Tonga in opening RWC clash

BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – AUGUST 27: Piri Weepu of the All Blacks leads the haka during the Tri-Nations Bledisloe Cup match between the Australian Wallabies and the New Zealand All Blacks at Suncorp Stadium on August 27, 2011 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Henry added: “Everyone in the All Blacks squad is excited by what lies ahead and we have also been humbled by the fantastic support we have been receiving.  From the player’s visit to the small towns to the official welcome at Aotea Square and just the people we meet when we are out and about, there is huge support which is really special.”The All Blacks have played Tonga three times, including at the 1999 Rugby World Cup and 2003 tournament. As well as Thorn and Ali Williams, Carter and Flynn also played against Tonga in the 2003 Rugby World CupStarting XV:1.         Tony Woodcock (76)2.         Andrew Hore (55)3.         Owen Franks (24)4.         Brad Thorn (52)5.         Ali Williams (66)6.         Jerome Kaino (41)7.         Richie McCaw – captain (98)8.         Victor Vito (8)9.         Jimmy Cowan (47)10.       Daniel Carter (83)11.       Isaia Toeava (32)12.       Sonny Bill Williams (7)13.       Ma’a Nonu (60)14.       Richard Kahui (12)15.       Israel Dagg (7) Piri Weepu will make his 50th appearance off the benchAll Blacks Coach Graham Henry and his Assistant Coaches Steve Hansen and Wayne Smith have today announced the All Blacks team for the opening match of the 2011 Rugby World Cup against Tonga at Eden Park, Auckland, on Friday 9 September.The team will be captained by Richie McCaw for the 62nd time, in his 99th Test, in a squad that is bristling with experience and balanced with rising stars of the All Blacks.In the front row, the All Blacks most capped prop Tony Woodcock will pack down alongside 55–Test hooker Andrew Hore and Owen Franks.  Experienced locks Brad Thorn and Ali Williams, who were the starting locks against Tonga at the 2003 Rugby World Cup, will start their 20th Test together, while Jerome Kaino brings experience back at blindside flanker, and Victor Vito gets just the third start of his burgeoning All Blacks career at number eight.Halfback Jimmy Cowan and playmaker Daniel Carter will start their 25th Test together while in the midfield, Ma’a Nonu moves out one position to centre to make way for Sonny Bill Williams, who gets his fifth Test start, at second–five eighth. In the back three, the selectors have picked Israel Dagg at fullback in his eighth Test, with the versatile Richard Kahui and Isaia Toeava on the wings.Meanwhile, the squad also features the first All Blacks appearance this year for lock Anthony Boric, who is on the bench.  Boric’s 2011 season ended prematurely after he suffered a foot injury during the Super Rugby Finals Series.  Halfback Piri Weepu also looks set to make his 50th Test appearance off the bench.Commenting on the team to play Tonga, All Blacks Coach Graham Henry said: “There is real competition in a number of positions, at fullback and on the wings and other positions as well, and the selection of the starting XV reflects that.  Those players selected have now been given the opportunity which is exciting and they will all look to make the most of their chance.”Henry said that it was important for to give the “backbone” of the starting XV regular game time together in the Pool Play matches, but balance it with the fact that other players needed to have the opportunity to get game time as well. Reserves: 16.       Corey Flynn (14)17.       Ben Franks (11)18.       Anthony Boric (20)19.       Sam Whitelock (18)20.       Piri Weepu (49)21.       Colin Slade (5)22.       Cory Jane (26)Number of Test caps in brackets read more

Daily news from New Zealand – 16 October – Video

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Brad Thorn and Richie McCaw celebrate after beating Australia to reach the RWC FinalOn today’s RWC Daily we have all the reaction to the RWC 2011 semi-final between Australia and New Zealand as the two teams looked to book their place in the final against France. Plus we visit the RWC 2011 Best-dessed street in New Zealand. New Zealand All Black lock Brad Thorn (L) and New Zealand All Black flanker Richie McCaw wave to fans as they leave the field after the 2011 Rugby World Cup semi-final match New Zealand vs Australia at the Eden Park in Auckland on October 16, 2011. AFP PHOTO / FRANCK FIFE (Photo credit should read FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images)last_img read more

Heineken Cup: Five things we learned from Rd 2

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Scarlets have made everyone feel all warm inside with their galloping, long-range rugby, replete with handling flourishes and impossible side-steps. However, at the heart of all of it is Rhys Priestland.He admits that last season he genuinely struggled with professional rugby, but he seems to have had a word with himself and in this competition in particular he has shone, helping set up flowing tries and kicking beautifully. He has nailed more kicks at goal than any other player with 13 and he is the competition’s top points scorer with 34. Impressive. Pretty in pink: Cardiff Blues celebrate under the posts after scoring against a shell shocked Toulon side on SaturdayWEEK TWO of the Heineken Cup gave us a dizzying doozy of a round, with some teams turning week-old convention on its head, some teams playing well but still somehow throwing themselves out of contention and others somehow scraping to the tops of tables.Here is what we learned this time round.Toulon are not invincibleThe bookies still value Toulon as favourites to win the whole thing, but the fact Jonny Wilkinson blanked a handful of reporters at the weekend after the match tells you that the talismanic fly-half and his well-remunerated chums from the south of France were most displeased with their loss to the Cardiff Blues.They can turn it on at home and they now have pedigree, but while they should progress there will be many hoping that away from home or at neutral grounds the flash boys from Toulon could be gotten at.Sock it too me: Maxime Medard hands kit to fans after winImpressive away wins should scare usUlster defeating Leicester Tigers in Belfast was impressive, but to back that up with 25-8 win away to Montpellier should cause everyone else in the competition to leak a bit of sweat. It could be assumed that the province will win twice against Treviso and no-one will want to play Ulster in Europe off the back of four wins.Meanwhile, a sleeping old giant looks to have finally climbed out of its funk as Toulouse beat Saracens by a single point in front of 61,000 fans at Wembley. It took a big crowd and a hefty, slapping challenge for them to look like they are up for a competition and they only just made it because of Owen Farrell’s wayward kicking, but they could be back in business and in scoring a timely, from-behind try with substitute (!) Louis Picamoles they have shown some old championship know-how. Pool 2 is tighter than a Walrus’ waistcoatWith Exeter Chiefs annihilating Cardiff Blues in one half and Toulon cantering to 50-odd points in week one you would expect the pair to do something similar the next week, but Glasgow Warriors ground out a win against the Chiefs and the Blues left everyone surprised with a brave win over Toulon.Chiefs and Toulon have six points each and Glasgow and Blues have five. Who knows which of the three – OK, we’ve already said Toulon should go through eventually – will go through, if they can. It will be interesting to see if anyone has enough points to qualify as the second place team, particularly if the sides revert back to scoring as freely as they did in round one.Leinster may be at it again…Against the Ospreys Sean O’Brien flexed his muscles and barreled headlong into the breakdown. Then, against Castres, they leant on Jimmy Gopperth and pointed to the sticks. They have no try bonuses, but the group is so tight underneath them that this means little. They know how to edge in front and stay there and if Northampton Saints cannot beat them in the next two matches there is every chance that Leinster will continue to grow into that pale blue beast everyone fears.Calling the shots: Rhys Priestland is in fine form this termRhys Priestland is a man in form <> at Parc y Scarlets on October 19, 2013 in Llanelli, Wales. last_img read more

Owen Farrell out of third Test

first_imgWith Lee Dickson and Richard Wigglesworth set for their first action of the tour in this mid-week fixture, there will be intense interest in which of them performs well, in case Care cannot recover from the shoulder injury which kept him out of England’s first Test in Auckland, which they lost 20-15.The wait is still on to see which outside centre the All Blacks opt for, with both Ryan Crotty and Malakai Fekitoa in the running to replace Conrad Smith who is out of the third Test with a broken bone in his hand. Owen Farrell has been ruled out of the third Test of England’s tour of New Zealand having pulled up with knee ligament damage.The news, which came just before England kicked off against the Canterbury Crusaders, arrived with updates on the fitness of other midfield doubts Danny Care, Billy Twelvetrees and Luther Burrell. The two centres took full parts in training whilst the scrum-half is being rated as ‘50-50’.With Freddie Burns certain to start the Test in Hamilton, it is a race to see which of Danny Cipriani and Stephen Myler is to get the nod  to sit on the bench on Saturday, with the team announcement due on Wednesday evening, BST. No longer running the show: England fly-half Owen Farrell will miss the third Test in New Zealand center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Rugby’s Greatest: Agustin Pichot

first_img Argentina Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide In possession, he probed around the fringes, pulling defenders around and releasing carriers. Without the ball, he harried runners relentlessly.Pichot was 20 when he made a try-scoring Test debut against Australia in 1995 and remained with Buenos Aires amateur outfit Club Atletico San Isidro until joining Richmond in 1997. Rugby’s Greatest: Agustin PichotIn the immediate aftermath of Argentina’s maiden Rugby Championship triumph – a tense 21-17 defeat of Australia in Mendoza – emotions were running high. Even so, mercurial centre Juan Martin Hernandez had one figure in mind above anyone else.“Many people were involved in making this dream come true,’ he said. “But I want to dedicate this victory to Agustin.”The tribute was touching, not least because Agustin Pichot spent his entire career as an insatiable standard-driver. That role seemed to be magnified by the intensity of the international arena, and he became an icon of the 2007 World Cup.Shoulder-length hair tousled around his collar and socks rolled down around the ankles, captain Pichot stood in the centre of circle of team-mates before and after each match. He spoke with conviction, cajoling them to work harder, congratulating them for challenging the world order.By the end of the tournament, Argentina had beaten Ireland, Scotland and France twice en route to third place. To precursor his impact as an instrumental campaigner post-retirement – pivotal in introducing Argentina to the Rugby Championship and a South American franchise to the 2016 Super Rugby competition – Pichot underlined his talents as a superb scrum-half. TAGS: The Greatest Players Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Expand Australia always seem to raise their game for… Major teams: Richmond, Bristol, Stade Français, Racing Metro


Country: Argentina

Test span: 1995-2007
Argentina caps: 71 (69 starts)

Test points: 60 (12T) New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Los Pumas failed to make it to the…center_img Australia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Argentina Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Via an enjoyable stint at Bristol, he arrived at Stade Français and helped them to domestic titles in 2004 and 2007 as well as a Heineken Cup decider in 2005.In 2000, Pichot captained Argentina for the first time in a 34-23 success over Ireland and was subsequently involved in overturning every Six Nations side, most notably England at Twickenham in 2006.Since retirement he has since been appointed Vice-Chairman of World Rugby. Australia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Collapse Winners of the past two World Cups, the… Expand Agustin Pichot fires a pass away last_img read more

Hotshot: Edinburgh back-row Luke Crosbie

first_img Capital gains: Edinburgh’s Luke Crosbie breaks against London Irish. Photo: Getty Images Get to know Luke Crosbie, who has been called into the Edinburgh set-up this season Age 20 (22 April 1997) Born Edinburgh Club Currie Country Scotland Position Back-rowWhen did you first play rugby? At five. Football is big in the area I’m from, but one day I was walking with my dad and we heard all this noise at Livingston rugby club. People were running into each other and I wanted to give it a shot. We went home, Dad gave them a call and I went along to training.Have you always played back-row? I started in the second row, but around U18s I moved to the back row. I’ve always been pretty quick for a forward.What do you like about the position? It’s better than putting your head between two front-rows! I enjoy it because you get more time on the ball. I try to accelerate aggressively through contact when carrying. I want to do the basics well – run hard with the ball and tackle hard.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREWhen did you first achieve Scotland honours? At U18. I wasn’t selected at U16 – I was competing against players from private schools who were getting more exposure to rugby. I kept training and pushing myself, then I played for Edinburgh U16 and got my first cap for Scotland U18. Last season I got a Stage Three academy contract – my first full-time contact – and played U20s. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS And you play for Currie… I’ve been at Currie since high school and worked my way up from the U16s to the first XV. I made my debut at 17, away at Hawick.This season I’m also training full-time with Edinburgh. I’m still signed with the academy but instead of training with them I’m training with the pros. I want to get as much exposure at Edinburgh as I can.What do you do away from rugby?I’m doing a degree in business management with marketing at Heriot-Watt University. They do a scholarship for athletes playing at a high level, so you can do your studies part-time. That helps me balance it with full-time training.RW Verdict: Crosbie has a balanced outlook but has impressed Richard Cockerill enough to be picked for Edinburgh – he made his debut as a sub against Zebre in the Pro14 in October. He could well earn a professional contract by the season’s end. TAGS: Edinburgh Rugby This article first appeared in the December 2017 issue of Rugby World.last_img read more

El Comité de Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas comienza a trabajar…

first_img Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET El Comité de Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas comienza a trabajar en el presupuesto 2013-2015 Miembros del Comité reconocen los retos económicos y filosóficos que enfrentan. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 6, 2012 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 [Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] Al tiempo que el Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas (PB&F por su sigla en inglés) se reunía aquí para debatir el anteproyecto del presupuesto 2013-2015, algunos de sus miembros expresaron que se enfrentaban al manejo de muchos asuntos en conflicto.El comité del presupuesto de reunió del 30 de enero al 2 de febrero en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo para recibir un anteproyecto del presupuesto trienal 2013-2015 que finalmente se someterá a la aprobación de la 77ª. Convención General este verano en Indianápolis. La reunión comenzó al día siguiente de que el Consejo Ejecutivo aprobara la versión provisional de un presupuesto balanceado de $104,9 millones para el [período] 2013-2015 y se lo pasara al PB&F.Uno de los conflictos que los miembros del PB&F debatieron se centró en las dificultades económicas que enfrentan las diócesis al tiempo de decidir cuánto dinero ha de dedicarse a la misión, ministerio e infraestructura de la Iglesia Episcopal a nivel denominacional.Del Glover, presidente del comité de financias del Consejo, le dijo al grupo del PB&F que el Consejo había estado debatiendo lo que él caracterizó como el conflicto entre “cuál es una expectativa razonable de solicitud a las diócesis y cuál es una expectativa razonable para el uso de los fondos de parte de la Iglesia, y esos son dos problemas distintos”.Otro conflicto era el concerniente al pago por los costos de la misión y actual estructura de la Iglesia, a sabiendas de que ha habido muchas propuestas para cambiar esa estructura y, posiblemente, redefinir la dirección y el foco de la misión y el ministerio.“Yo creo que era correcto decir hace tres años que no podíamos seguir funcionando como de costumbre, pero todos sabemos el conflicto [que se produce] en seguir funcionando como de costumbre al tiempo de plantear que ya no podemos seguir funcionando como de costumbre”, dijo George Councell, miembro del PB&F  y obispo de la Diócesis de Nueva Jersey, al presentar ese dilema.Él se refería en parte a una decisión que se tomara en la última reunión de la Convención General en 2009 de reducir la cantidad de dinero que se solicitaba de las 110 diócesis de la Iglesia en uno por ciento anual, del 21 por ciento del ingreso operativo diocesano en 2010 al 20 por ciento en 2011 y al 19 por ciento en 2012. El presupuesto resultante de 2010-2012 se basaba en un ingreso de $141.271.984  en comparación al total de $104 millones que ahora se prevé para el presupuesto 2013-2015 en base a la solicitud del 19 por ciento anual.El presupuesto 2010-2012 fue de $23 millones menos que el del trienio anterior y ha dado lugar al comienzo de un cambio en la manera en que el personal de la oficina Denominacional realiza su trabajo. Ese presupuesto supone que parte de la labor que realiza el personal de la Iglesia a nivel denominacional podría hacerse mejor en los niveles diocesano y congregacional. El personal denominacional se ha orientado a ayudar a interconectar la capacidad de la Iglesia en todos los niveles y a poner sus propias capacidades a disposición de esas redes y de otras organizaciones, en lugar de crear y llevar a cabo programas por sí mismo.Ese cambio, que el anteproyecto del presupuesto 2013-2015 propone continuar e incrementar, dio lugar a otro conflicto que el PB&F debatió: la cuestión de si dejar más dinero en las diócesis y congregaciones redundará efectivamente en más trabajo de misión y de alcance social, o si terminaría destinándose a compensar el presupuesto general.Susannah Perkinson, miembro del Comité, sugirió que reducir el monto del dinero en el presupuesto “conlleva confiar en que las congregaciones y diócesis hagan buen uso del dinero si éste se queda allí y tal vez educarlas [al respecto] para que ciertamente hagan buen uso de él”.Otro conflicto con el que el PB&F tuvo que enfrentarse fue si el presupuesto debía ser el mecanismo para hacer esos cambios y, de ser así, de qué manera.Diane Pollard, presidente del BB&F dijo al comité que “estamos atrapados entre el proceso actual y el deseo de muchos de cambiar ese proceso, y yo no creo que sea labor de este comité cambiar el proceso”.Steve Lane, copresidente del Comité y obispo de la Diócesis de Maine, dijo que él era “una voz que se opone a reducir el presupuesto, porque creo que estamos reduciendo a ciegas sin mayor debate: una reducción es tan buena como cualquier otra y no hay manera de decidir que cosa nos lleva más lejos que otra, porque no sabemos adónde vamos”.La Rda. Canóniga Mally Lloyd, miembro del PB&F se hizo eco de este conflicto al decir, “estoy totalmente en conflicto porque creo que deberíamos hacer algo radicalmente diferente y creo que llegamos hasta el borde y retrocedemos, y luego vamos hasta el borde y volvemos a retroceder”.Al final, el PB&F convino en dejar que Lane y Pollar crearan un grupo de trabajo compuesto por miembros del Comité para recoger información sobre las diversas propuestas de cambios estructurales  que se han debatido recientemente. Gregory Straub, el Secretario de la Convención General sugirió que el grupo reúna también información sobre los intentos que se han hecho en ese sentido en el pasado.“Eso no significa necesariamente que manejaremos todo esto, pero podemos tener todo esto delante de nosotros y tal vez, en la redacción del presupuesto, sirva de ayuda a los movimientos que se vayan creando” opinó Lane respecto a la práctica.El anteproyecto del presupuesto debe publicarse aquí pronto, anunció Kurt Barnes, el Tesorero [de la Iglesia]. Él le dijo al PB&F que él y sus colegas necesitaban tiempo para ajustar el documento de manera que refleje con precisión cierto número de cambios que el Consejo le hizo durante la última tarde de su reunión. Cuando se dé a conocer, el documento incluirá una carta del Consejo en la que explica la lógica que se usa en la redacción del presupuesto.El Consejo le ha asignado a su Comité Ejecutivo que diseñe y controle el proceso de la creación del presupuesto, y el pasado 27 de enero ese comité la presentó al Consejo dos posibilidades para el presupuesto. En una se le solicitaba a las diócesis que contribuyeran con el 19 por ciento de sus ingresos, y la otra se basaba en los ingresos [obtenidos] si las diócesis contribuían con el 15 por ciento. La diferencia de ingresos fue de aproximadamente $13,5 millones.El Consejo redactó la versión final del anteproyecto del presupuesto 2013-2015 suponiendo que se solicitará el 19 por ciento, en tanto los gastos se bosquejaron en base a la versión del 15 por ciento. En esa perspectiva de gastos, los miembros del Consejo fijaron entonces sus prioridades para restablecer partes del presupuesto. Entre esas prioridades se incluyeron la inversión en redes incipientes y el apoyo de las ya existentes, a fin de potenciar el ministerio y las comunicaciones locales.“Esto es un anteproyecto de presupuesto y nada es sacrosanto”, dijo Pollard al grupo del PB&F al comienzo de su reunión. “Lo que es sacrosanto es que no podemos cambiarlo entre ahora y la Convención General”.Lo que el  PB&F puede hacer es informarse de cómo el anteproyecto del presupuesto se redactó y conseguir más detalles respecto al trabajo que financia, y establecer un mecanismo para llevarlo a cabo, incluido el entrevistar a algunos miembros del personal denominacional. Straub le dijo al Comité que también puede considerar y presentar resoluciones antes del comienzo de la Convención a fin de discutirlas temprano en la agenda, si fuere necesario.Una vez que empiece la Convención, el PB&F convocará una audiencia abierta el 4 de julio (el día antes del comienzo oficial de la Convención), de 12:30 P.M. a 1:30 P.M., para discutir el marco del presupuesto 2013-2015; y recogerá testimonios sobre una resolución que le pedirá a la Convención que ratifique la decisión tomada en la última reunión trienal (a través de la Resolución D027) a fin de que el presupuesto 2013-2015 se centre en lo que llamó las “prioridades estratégicas” de las Cinco Marcas de la Misión de la Comunión Anglicana.El PB&F también sostendrá otras dos audiencias en la Convención, una sobre decisiones de egresos en la noche del 6 de julio y otra sobre decisiones de ingresos el 7 de julio, también en la noche. Las tres audiencias probablemente conllevarán discusiones en pequeños grupos, moderadas por miembros del PB&F así como habrá lugar para testimonios individuales.El Comité también se propone instalar una página web —o blog— moderada para recibir comentarios de toda la Iglesia sobre su labor.Además de estas vistas, el Comité se reunirá diariamente para trabajar en un presupuesto que ha de presentarle a la Convención. Como parte de ese proceso, los miembros deben proponer una fórmula de financiación que incluya el determinar qué porcentaje del ingreso operativo se le pedirá a las diócesis que contribuyan. Además de considerar y posiblemente cambiar el plan de egresos contenido en el anteproyecto del presupuesto que el Consejo propone, el Comité también debe tomar en cuenta todas las resoluciones aprobadas por la Convención que impliquen gastos.El Comité debe presentar su propuesta presupuestaria no más tarde de las 2:15 P.M. del 10 de julio en una sesión conjunta de la Cámara de Obispos y de la Cámara de Diputados, en el recinto de esta última. Se ha fijado una votación de cada cámara para el 12 de julio, el último día de la Convención. El presupuesto entra en vigor el 1 de enero de 2013.—La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es editora/reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori’s opening remarks

first_img Rector Collierville, TN July 6, 2012 at 5:58 pm Carol – Well said. Frighteningly enough, a spirit is at work, but not the Holy Spirit! Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Don Meadows says: Tags July 10, 2012 at 7:18 pm Resolution A-69: “That it is the sense of this General Convention that homosexual persons are children of God who have a full and equal claim with all other persons upon the love, acceptance, and pastoral concern and care of the Church.”Resolution A-71: “That this General Convention expresses its conviction that homosexual persons are entitled to equal protection of the laws with all other citizens, and calls upon our society to see that such protection is provided in actuality.”These were passed in 1976. 36 years later, I’m sure my LGBT friends will be glad to know that some in TEC and the AC still consider these issues to be “nonsense.”The authors of Leviticus lived in the Bronze Age. We live in the 21st century. The simple fact is that there is no nexus between sexual orientation and morality, no matter what “tradition” says. Terri Degenhardt says: Jerome Norris says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA July 4, 2012 at 10:48 pm Good GOD! Who will deliver us of this troublesome Bishop? Peggy Blanchard says: Featured Events July 6, 2012 at 1:42 pm I would have been impressed had she repented of the sin of persecuting Traditional Anglicans, fellow Christians yet, and extended the hand of fellowship to ACNA. That along with stopping the unforgivable waste of church resources on legal fees to punish traditional believers would have meant and signaled change for the good. As I see it this address is just more words from the PB. What a shame, what a wasted opportunity! July 4, 2012 at 8:48 pm As Walter Brueggeman said; God has endless possibilities for us….awesome opening address from our PB….thank you Jeffrey Knox says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Posted Jul 4, 2012 Bob Cochrane says: July 6, 2012 at 6:27 pm I agree 100% Rector Shreveport, LA July 5, 2012 at 3:00 pm It seems to me that if Jesus is calling an individual elsewhere, then they need to follow. Why hang around and bemoan the fact that you are unhappy? The Rev Marcia King says: July 6, 2012 at 8:22 pm Because this is my church too. Although the center in TEC has definitely shifted not everyone has left. Many remain to preach the Gospel of Christ. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Maxine Schell says: July 5, 2012 at 2:20 pm “Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, or sitteth in the seat of the scornful.”We – your Anglican flock out here in the internet – are watching with great interest. Not just what you do, but how you choose to communicate with (at?) each other. July 5, 2012 at 8:13 am At this point in the life of the Church (if ever) I don’t believe it’s useful to simply make slighting remarks about one another or one another’s words (including the PB’s.) Rather than criticizing, we need to share constructive ideas with one another. I’m struck by her pointing out the work of the Episcopal Church in Frankfurt, Germany and how they began (and continue, I would think) by going out into the community to see what needs are there that that congregation might be equipped to address. I plan to encourage both my small congregations to do some intentional work in this area. We are, after all, supposed be about building God’s kingdom before Church buildings, of which we have more than enough. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments are closed. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 5, 2012 at 9:53 am For every vestry meeting that ever was, diocesan gathering, and the prayers said that shaped them; “We give thanks for all God’s People of this General Convention who “have been sent to do the work God has given us to do…” Brad Howard says: Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Steve Wylder says: July 5, 2012 at 11:51 am In the past, I’ve felt that Bishop Jefferts Schori has come off as aloof, elitist, and out of touch with ordinary Episcopalians. Here she’s trying, and I think, succeeding in overcoming that image. She’s even made an effort to connect with those who disagree with her. Thank You, Bishop! Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI July 4, 2012 at 6:38 pm Our primate’s opening message is spot on. I pray that God’s Holy Spirit will have free reign at Convention, and that all involved will listen with open ears, open hearts, and open minds to what God is saying. One of the deacons in Los Angeles has coined a phrase that sums up the Bishop’s words – God is calling us to create “portals of entry” for people to enter the Kingdom of God. Imagine if all of us worked to create these portals of entry through which all people were welcome to enter through. Blessings as you journey together at Convention! July 5, 2012 at 12:50 pm Please pay particular attention to what Bishop Jefferts Schori said about the “Spiritual But not Religious” Christians. We must find an effective way to provide spiritual fulfillment to all who gather as “Church” if the Episcopal Church is to not simply wither away as a non-relevant experience for Christ’s brothers and sisters. We need to build upon Spiritual and Religious in all that we do in our congregations. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Carol McRee says: General Convention, [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The following opening statement was presented July 4 by Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori at the 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church, meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana, through July 12.Opening RemarksGeneral Convention4 July 2012The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and Primate, The Episcopal ChurchWhen this body gathered three years ago we reflected on mission as God’s beating heart in our midst. General Convention is this Church’s regular opportunity to strengthen that incarnate heart for its work in the coming years. We’re here for a tune-up – to breathe deep, clear our vision, focus the muscles, and synchronize our heartbeat with God’s.I would invite everyone here to take a deep breath. Breathe in Holy Spirit, the source of life. Remember that we depend on that divine gift for all that we are and all that we have. Breathe deep, for the spirit is blowing a fresh wind, and bringing new creation out of the chaos of the deep. Contemplating that chaos frightens some, for we never know what is coming, but there is no creation without it – like the death that must precede resurrected life. We struggle with it because we can’t yet see what is aloft on that breeze. Yet we are the stuff of God’s creation, we are borne on that wind as partners in God’s re-creation, reconciling, and healing of this world. Breathe deep, and be not afraid, for God is at work in our midst.Consider what happens when hearts and minds and spirits are open to receive that breath. For some, it may feel like the hard push of resuscitation after breathing has stopped – like rescue breathing for a drowning victim. The only solution is to let go and receive that breath, for there is no life without it.Sometimes that breath feels like a mere whiff, a barely discernible zephyr in the evening garden. Go on out there and search for more – go look for the freshening breeze.Or that breath may be like the last gasp of a hospice patient. Let it go. Give thanks for the life that has been, and expect resurrection.And for some, that breath may come like the first one taken by a newborn child – the breath that comes with an old-fashioned whack on the backside. Cry out for joy!Let that breath get the heart beating and the blood moving, for we will never be God’s mission partners otherwise. Let that circulating blood connect us with the other parts of this body, here and far beyond this place. Go look for connections with your sparring partners – for the left hook and the right jab both come from the same body. Link up with somebody from another part of the theological spectrum – this big tent is the dwelling place of the holy, and we will never be who we were created to be if we only work with the fingers of the right hand or the left. Search out those you have wounded or who have wounded you – seek them out and let the grudges go – there isn’t much life in hanging on to them. It’s like that old tale about swallowing rat poison and expecting somebody else to die. Go find the supposed source of wounds and build a bridge together – notice the blood that’s been shed, and let it form a good scab to draw flesh together. Continue to pick at the wound and it will never heal. Let it go and keep breathing.If this convention is The Episcopal Church’s family reunion, then go find somebody who represents the outlaw side of the family for you and spend a few minutes learning your relative’s story. You might promise to pray for each other through the coming days. Perhaps you can find time for a cup of coffee or a meal together. That kind of reconciling work will have a greater effect on our readiness for mission than any legislation we may pass here. We’re here to tune up the muscles and nerves and ligaments of this body for reconciling work, for the work of mission writ large. We’re going to need the gifts of every single part of the body in order to respond to that breath/wind/spirit blowing over the face of the deep – so go and build some living bridges.Episcopalians are increasingly engaged in creative reconciling work with other bodies and partners beyond this Church. We’ve learned a lot in recent years about neighbors across the globe and in more local communities. We have been in full communion with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America for more than ten years, and we’re growing into a newer full communion relationship with the Moravians. We are sharing and exchanging staff members with the ELCA, and our armed forces chaplains are working and learning together. The Moravians have a great deal to teach us about reconciliation, particularly in their commitment to avoid having anyone leave the table. The first Episcopal church is about to receive a Moravian pastor – in Western North Carolina.We’re seeing new possibilities in our conversations with the Methodist churches, and the ways in which that conversation is working to heal the sin of racism will ultimately strengthen us all.Recent years have seen some healing in our relationships around the Anglican Communion, and missional partnerships continue to grow and deepen. We are learning a great deal about how to be more effective partners, particularly when we are able to engage with humility and openness to our own transformation.We have another significant opportunity for bridge-building, with the SBNRs around us – those who claim to be Spiritual But Not Religious. Those fields are indeed ripe with possibility, but the crop needs rather different methods than we’re used to. We need robust networks and the eager humility that will let us learn from others who are engaging new populations. The people of the Episcopal church in Frankfurt in Germany offer a great example. That congregation is reaching out to American deportees, people with German citizenship but often no ability to speak the language and no knowledge of the culture, who have been expelled by the United States, often for quite minor legal infractions. The congregation Christ the King is building community with people who have deeply spiritual questions but no trust or experience with the church. There is some similar kind of need almost everywhere, but it means going out into the community to listen for it, and finding new ways of sharing what we know of more abundant life in Jesus.Re-forming and re-imagining ourselves for mission in a changed world is the most essential task we have before us. We’re not going to fix the church or the world at this Convention, but we can do something to make the church a better tool and instrument for God’s mission if we can embrace that new wind, discover God creating new life among us, and listen and look for Jesus.We need a responsive set of structures, more connected at all levels of the church, and better able to tap the gifts of all parts of the body. There is good and creative work going on in many places, and we need to learn how to spread that information and learning as widely as possible. It needs nodal systems, like the heart muscle in a circulatory system, or the cells in a nervous system that collect and keep passing on the news. That pumping heart or those nerve cells are initiators or stimulators of communication – in other words, leaders. When those parts are equipped and committed to sharing good news, then the network becomes far more effective, and communication ripples out and across the broader community. But when effective and distributed leadership is absent, those networks quickly disintegrate.The world around us is learning to develop effective and robust networks – and so are we. There are networks of innovators in church planting and congregational development, including ones that offer peer coaching. A couple of days ago a deputy suggested another possibility – what about TED talks for TEC as a more fruitful purpose for this kind of churchwide gathering?We are just beginning to move toward this kind of a network for theological education resources – of seminaries, diocesan programs, and others – and that movement needs a whole lot more encouragement!The domestic poverty initiative born at the last Convention is an example that is bearing significant fruit, from the churchwide gatherings focused on best practices to the ongoing work in Asset Based Community Development and other forms of community organizing. Looking at the assets already present in our communities as a necessary part of mission engagement is a way of discovering where God has already been at work, blessing the created nature in a local context. It’s a theological approach that says we will notice where the kingdom is already present, or in the process of emerging.Many of you know other places where effective connective tissue is emerging and growing – Episcopal Community Services, Episcopal Service Corps, the ethnic ministry and justice networks. Passion keeps networks like those growing and expanding – it’s about blessing the work of the Spirit and letting the wind of God fill the sails and propel us into the world.Discovering the most effective ways to organize and network ourselves for mission, for governance, and for supporting that mission is going to require us to look outside ourselves. We have to be willing to search out the gifts and assets already present. Something like a blue ribbon commission would be helpful – a leadership group that includes independent voices, that is non-partisan, that will offer the input of outsiders and people on the margins of the church, not just those already deeply invested in the church and in the way the church is now. That may not be easy for this body to engage, but God is already at work beyond this Episcopal Church and we have something to learn from that reality.A lot of the anxiety in this body right now is rooted in fear of diminishment, loss of power or control, or change in status. The wider church – the grassroots – in not all that interested in the internal politics of this gathering. It is interested in the vitality of local congregations and communities, in ministry with young people, and in opportunities for transformative mission engagement in and beyond the local context. Our job here is to make common cause for the sake of God’s mission. That is in part a political task.Politics is not a dirty word – it refers to the art of living together in community, and it applies to Christ’s body as much as it does to the various nations in which this Church is present. We don’t yet live in the fullness of the reign of God, even though we do see glimpses of it around us and among us. Our task is to gather the various parts of this body of Christ, together with any partners who share our values, for the work of building societies that look more like the reign of God. That takes compromise, for we will never all agree on the proper route or method for getting there. We live in the awkward yet lively tension between what is and what will eventually come to be, in God’s good time. We aren’t going to find perfection at this Convention, but we can prayerfully work at discerning a way forward that will let us gather our common gifts to work toward that dream of the reign of God.We’re in this together – as the full range of Episcopalians, together with our Christian siblings – both those most like us and those who seem most distant – and we have other potential partners for the various parts of the mission God sends us to do. Our task is to be wise as serpents and innocent as doves, in finding and blessing any creative gift that will serve God’s dream. Can we reframe our view? Will those with eyes to see and ears to hear look for the places where God’s creative presence is already at work? God has given those gifts, and we will miss the mark if we ignore them. We will miss all five marks if we ignore the partners and possibilities around us.So breathe deep, open your eyes and ears, build bridges with unlikely folks, and let God’s word prosper in that for which God sent it. And may God bless our labors in this place! Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Brett Johnson says: July 5, 2012 at 10:16 am Amen Peggy! Peter Tucker says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img Karl Watts says: July 4, 2012 at 8:46 pm I am so impressed by the clarity of our Presiding Bishop’s opening remarks. I have been, and continue to be so proud of her and incredibly grateful that she is our Primate! In today’s world The Episcopal Church has no choice, it has to face current social issues head on and…that appears to be exactly what Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori has made a habit of doing. Kudos to her and to TEC for having elected her the head of TEC six years ago. I am very proud and thankful for church leaders like her. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Timothy G. Warren says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Comments (26) Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Donald Whipple Fox says: Joyce Kauffman says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL July 5, 2012 at 11:28 am Our Presiding Bishop gave great opening remarks for us to build on. Mary Rosendahl says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls K Soto says: General Convention 2012, July 5, 2012 at 7:42 am Timothy, There is a spirit that is having free reign at this General Convention but it is NOT the Holy Spirit. If the Holy Spirit were to have free reign at this convention, we would experience an awful lot of metanoia and repentance among the progressives in attendance. These people would realize what they had done and repent in front of both houses, then be baptized (still enough believing clergy around to do the job) and start behaving in a Christian manner. That would be a start. After that, I suggest the first course of action to be dropping the investigations of the ten clergy. There are many things that could happen that indicate the Holy Spirit is at work but passing a bunch of nonsense resolutions is not one of them. Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori’s opening remarks Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA July 13, 2012 at 1:11 pm “The simple fact is that there is no nexus between sexual orientation and morality, no matter what “tradition” says.” That’s just your opinion. You might be wrong. Just like the anti gay people might be wrong. We need to agree to disagree. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Karen White says: Carol Dent says: Peter Tucker says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ July 5, 2012 at 10:07 am Was excited to hear about the work at Christ the King in Frankfurt, Germany. More than thirty years ago it was the congregation where my husband and I became Episcopalians. So thankful for that place and church then and now and remembering the Rt. Rev. Bob Denig and his work during his short time on this earth. Press Release Service Karl Watts says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA July 12, 2012 at 11:03 am Well said The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 6, 2012 at 2:23 pm I’m a United Methodist pastor. The bishop’s “message” is much ado about nothing — it’s written poetically but she is more concerned about her style than about her “stuff.” I finally got so bored that I skipped the last 1/3. Maybe that’s where the meat was hidden. Is this a typical Episcopal “sermon?” I was going to link it, but why put other people to the stress of trying to swim in a swirling sea of verbal froth? Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Susan Norris says: July 5, 2012 at 2:55 pm Well said! Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Bruce Babcock says: Dan Tootle says: Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori July 5, 2012 at 1:38 am With what that she said do you take exception? The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group July 5, 2012 at 6:34 pm I can appreciate your observation that she has made an effort to connect with those who disagree with her. However, the relationship has been damaged and trust has been lost. July 5, 2012 at 7:09 am With what to take exception? Nothing at all. Because there is nothing at all in in the cliché ridden theo-word salad. There is the call to build bridges: “So breathe deep, open your eyes and ears, build bridges with unlikely folks.” (This sort of reminds me of a Moody Blues song.) The example given is the (now old) ties with the ELCA. A bridge between one dying liberal protestant denomination and another is hardly “unlikely”. Lots of words signifying nothing, no mention of that Jesus guy, all standard stuff from the current and next triennium PB.last_img read more

Gathering laments the Doctrine of Discovery

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 General Convention 2012, July 17, 2012 at 7:10 pm It saddens me that those of us who are beneficiaries of that doctrine, can’t seem to realize how much suffering and grief our white oriented prejudices has cost those that were most affected by it. We would all be richer if we just opened our eyes, hearts and minds to the beauty of indigenous, African-American and other oppressed people’s culture and contributions. After teaching for 21 years, I have come to realize that the person who writes the history books is the one who controls its point of view and content. Very sad. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA General Convention, Rector Martinsville, VA Indigenous Ministries John D. Andrews says: Comments (4) Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls By Lynette WilsonPosted Jul 11, 2012 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Gathering laments the Doctrine of Discovery Convention directs dioceses to examine impact Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 12, 2012 at 9:42 am Our prayers are with you. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Red Leaf Singers from the Rosebud Sioux Reservation, South Dakota, playing the drum. ENS photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service — Indianapolis] Erma J. Vizenor, chairwoman of the White Earth Nation, stepped to the microphone and told the story of a beautiful young woman who, two weeks after being crowned princess during the nation’s June Pow Wow, hanged herself in her basement.“She’d been sexually abused, raped, and carried all the pain within her, and so she took her life,” said Vizenor, sharing the young woman’s story as an offering “towards awareness and history” during “A Lament Over the Doctrine of Discovery,” a gathering held July 10 at the J.W. Marriott.The three-hour lament began with an hour-long vigil. It then moved into a prayerful gathering with music and reflection in support of a communal process seeking awareness and mutual understanding to acknowledge and lament the tragic consequences of the Doctrine of Discovery in hope for a transformed reality.Sponsored by the Episcopal Church’s offices of Indigenous Ministry, Lifelong Christian Formation, and Social and Economic Justice, the gathering featured the Red Leaf Singers from the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and prayers lead by people from native communities nationwide. The Episcopal Church has four dioceses in Indian Country: Alaska, Navajoland Area Mission, and North and South Dakota.Sarah Eagle Heart, the Episcopal Church’s missioner for indigenous ministry, encouraged those present to open themselves to emotion and vulnerability through which they might find truth even though the transition might be painful.“Tonight is a gathering of community. We’ll listen and pray together,” said Eagle Heart. “It will be tough, but we’ll continue to move forward in truth and understanding.”Eagle Heart led the gathering through a prayer for transformation:O God of all Earthbless us into the spiritual callto be agents of unity among all people.Let us not turn aside for the sake of our own comfortor convenience,but let us turn instead to standin support of our brothers and sisters.Let their hope be my hope.Bishop John T. Tarrant, of South Dakota, and Bishop Mark Lattime, of Alaska, July 10 during A Lament Over the Doctrine of Discovery. ENS photo/Lynette WilsonThe “Doctrine of Discovery” refers to international laws, ecclesiastical documents and policies that were understood to set forth the ways colonial powers laid claim to newly discovered territories, beginning in the early 1500s and continuing through the 1700s. The doctrine gave the church’s full blessing and sanction to the colonizing dispossession — and resulting genocide — of the indigenous peoples and lands of the Americas.Under what was called “Manifest Destiny,” it was believed throughout the 19th century that the United States, specifically people of Anglo-Saxon descent, were destined to expand across the continent.The 77th General Convention passed a Resolution A128 directing dioceses to examine the impact of the Doctrine of Discovery.The Executive Council Committee on Anti-Racism proposed the resolution, noting in the explanation that it believed a resolution repudiating the doctrine that passed at the 2009 General Convention should extend “to address all people of color who have experienced and continue to experience oppression because of policies and practices grounded [in] the Doctrine of Discovery.”The doctrine, the explanation continued, “sanctioned the slave trade in Africa, and the New World, the killing of indigenous people in the Americas, the forcible placement of native children in residential schools where they were forbidden to speak their own languages, and were physically, emotionally and sexually abused, the taking of native lands and the overall attempt to destroy indigenous cultures.”Asked in an interview with Episcopal News Service earlier in convention what the church’s actions on the doctrine meant to the Native-American population, Deacon Terry Star, said, “Repudiating the Doctrine of Discovery is very important to us. But what concerns me [is], black, Hispanic and Asian leaders are supportive and participating in our work, but you don’t see many European Americans, and the discovery affects them as well.“I find that white people find it difficult to accept their historical role in oppression of people of color,” said Star, a deputy of the Diocese of North Dakota and a member of Executive Council.Repudiating the doctrine acknowledges how native people were treated historically and how they are treated today, said Star, who is part of the Standing Rock Episcopal Community of North Dakota.“I may not have been rounded up, given small pox-infected blankets or beaten for speaking my language, but I live with the aftermath,” he said.Before contacted by Europeans in 1492, Native Americans had sophisticated political and education systems and a vibrant culture. Following contact came colonization, displacement and, in some cases, “entire tribes were wiped away,” explained Vizenor.“That’s the history now embedded in the Doctrine of Discovery,” said Vizenor, the first ever woman elected chairman of White Earth Nation, located in Minnesota.Later, she said, came the missionaries deployed to “civilize” and “Christianize” the native people, and in 1789 the first of what later amounted to more than 100 boarding schools, where in some cases children as young as 6 were taken from their families and enrolled, and their language and culture were taken away. These children were not taught academics, Vizenor said, but rather girls were taught home economics and boys trade skills, spending half the day in hard labor.After the boarding schools, came the adoption period from 1950-1970. “Twenty-five percent of our children were adopted out, taken away,” said Vizenor. “Can you imagine the trauma in the home … and the child raised isolated?”The trauma still felt in Native-American communities today, the result of genocide and the destruction of a culture and a people, and continued oppression have lead to despair, hopelessness, high suicide rates and drug and alcohol abuse, Vizenor said.Following passage of General Convention’s 2009 resolution repudiating the doctrine, the Anglican Church of Canada took a similar action in 2010, followed by the World Council of Churches in 2012.Since 2009, the Episcopal Church has produced resources, a video exploring the lasting impact of the doctrine. For Lent 2012, the church issued the third in a series of Lifelong Faith Formation resources for congregations, “Seeking God’s Justice for All,” exposing the Doctrine of Discovery.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Advocacy Peace & Justice, Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Edith DiTommaso says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest July 12, 2012 at 5:38 pm “I pray that the congregations of the Episcopal Church will take advantage of the resources the church has made available and lead our country into a new and better future for all in America.” Grant, several months ago I was turned down by my priest when I asked to present the Doctrine of Discovery curriculum, as well as an anti-racism curriculum created by the Episcopal Church. So, prayers are needed to get our priests to allow their congregations to become aware of the suffering within our own denomination, so our parishioners can seek God’s guidance on how to go forward, bringing healing, and reconciliation. What will emerge will be a stronger and more relevant Church. Gail Stephens says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ July 13, 2012 at 6:49 pm Grant Abbott,Please tell us what you mean when you call for “repentance” and “real gestures.”I mean, if the Civil War and 14th and 15th Amendments are not acts of repentance for bringing slaves here, what exactly could we do that would be more meaningful to you? Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI David Pittelli says: Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

Charles vonRosenberg nominated as South Carolina bishop provisional

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. January 12, 2013 at 6:32 pm What strange recommendations for a Bishop ! Did he help lead anyone to the knowledge of our Lord, Jesus Christ? If so, whose Gospel did he preach ? Bruce Garner says: People, Nancy Mott says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bryan Hunter says: January 12, 2013 at 3:16 pm This announcement is yet another sign that the Episcopal Church is alive and well in the low country. This is thanks to the many long-suffering, belligered, loyal Episcopalians from Georgia to North Carolina, a remarkable leadership of Churchpeople, and a great Presiding Bishop. The anti-Episcopal Church party freely chose to leave the Episcopal Church. They are now gone but of course are keeping up their war on the Episcopal Church because their union is based on fighting a common enemy. In just a couple of weeks the Episcopal diocese will meet in convention, approve the new bishop and get on with rebuilding a once great diocese. No amount of opposition the anti side can throw up in court or out will stop the Episcopal Church from thriving again in SC. This must be very unsettling to people who thought they could leave the Episcopal Church and take the Church with them. Chris Walchesky says: January 12, 2013 at 6:03 am No, I think that Lawrence has behaved with integrity. He did not lead his diocese out of TEC as far as I can see. He was trying to find a way to stay in TEC, even if barely, with the hope that eventually the situation would improve and that TEC would become a more inclusive church that allowed space for his evangelical tradition to flourish. TEC opted for fundamentalism (on the Left, to be sure) rather than a genuine inclusivity. Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing January 16, 2013 at 6:13 pm yep, emerging by dropping membership by the thousands every month! Heresy always dies in the church. January 11, 2013 at 8:45 am Staying positive and responding to the headline, I offer my prayers for a hopeful future. Charlie vonRosenberg was on the commission on ministry when I went through discernment in Upper South Carolina and I have known him to be impeccable both in word and deed. He is a thoughtful and caring person and should lead the people well. I wish you all well! Press Release Service Steven Long says: January 24, 2013 at 3:58 pm Oh my Ronald J. Caldwell that was quite a post. “Long suffering, belligered, Episcopalians in Georgia to North Carolina”? Your post conveys the sanctimonious attitude of the northern US towards the south. This isn’t the 1950’s that you and others still think the south remains. If you think the region is over run by conservative bishops, you’re obviously confused or not from the SE US or a combination thereof. Other than the Diocese of South Carolina, the EC in these areas are ruled by lap dogs of Jefforts Shori. SC will win this fight as they have case law on their side and it’s going to be interesting to watch the ECUS explain why they violated their own canon law in court. Also, the church thrives in South Carolina because of the biblical and orthodox beliefs of the leadership and will continue under the leadership of Bishop Lawrence. Next time you post a comment, I hope you will have a better understanding of the facts. Rector Tampa, FL V. Tupper Morehead, MD, MDiv, TSSF says: Rick Callaway says: Steven Long says: January 13, 2013 at 11:01 pm That is the problem with TEC…”well liked and committed to TEC” is a far cry from being committed to making disciples of Christ. Interesting how DioSC was one of the only few and I mean few growing and flourishing diocese in the country under Bp Salmon and Bp Lawrence. I guess they were making disciples while the others were dying. V. Tupper Morehead, MD, MDiv, TSSF says: January 14, 2013 at 6:16 pm Inclusive to whom ? Certainly female priests are not common in this SC diocese. Why is that the case ? Hmmmm….. Bonnie Leazer says: John Fisher says: [Episcopal News Service] The Rt. Rev. Charles Glenn vonRosenberg, a retired bishop of East Tennessee with longtime ties to South Carolina, has been nominated as bishop provisional of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.The Rt. Rev. Charles Glenn vonRosenberg, a retired bishop of East Tennessee with longtime ties to South Carolina, has been nominated as bishop provisional of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. Photo/Diocese of South CarolinaHis name will be presented for a vote on Jan. 26 when local clergy and laypeople who are continuing with the Episcopal Church gather with Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori in a special meeting of the diocesan convention at Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston, according to a diocesan press release.The continuing Diocese of South Carolina needs a new episcopal leader because Jefferts Schori said Dec. 5 that Mark Lawrence had renounced his orders. She and her Council of Advice agreed that, in a Nov. 17 speech to a special diocesan convention, Lawrence said the diocese had left the Episcopal Church a month earlier on Oct. 17 when she restricted his ministry after the church’s Disciplinary Board for Bishops had certified to her that he had abandoned the Episcopal Church “by an open renunciation of the discipline of the church.”The day the board’s decision was announced, the diocesan Standing Committee said that the action “triggered two pre-existing corporate resolutions of the diocese, which simultaneously disaffiliated the diocese from the Episcopal Church and called a special convention.”Lawrence asked for and received affirmation from those at the Nov. 17 gathering of that departure.In addition to voting on vonRosenberg’s nomination, the convention of the continuing diocese will also choose people to fill other diocesan offices made vacant by Lawrence’s actions.If elected, vonRosenberg would be installed during the Jan. 26 meeting, and immediately take up his duties as bishop of a diocese that covers 24 counties in eastern South Carolina. Currently, at least 19 parishes and missions and six worship communities in the diocese have indicated they are remaining with the Episcopal Church, and a number of others are still deciding, the diocesan release said.A bishop provisional has all the authority and responsibilities of a diocesan bishop, but typically serves for a set period of time and is meant to be a bridge into the time when the diocese is ready to elect a diocesan bishop or make other decisions about its future.VonRosenberg and his wife, Annie, already reside in the Daniel Island community of Charleston, where he retired in 2011 after serving for 12 years as bishop of East Tennessee, the release said. Since October he has served, along with retired Bishop John Buchanan, on a voluntary basis as adviser to the steering committee that formed in October to help reorganize the diocese.VonRosenberg served parishes in the dioceses of Upper South Carolina and North Carolina, and later as canon to the ordinary in Upper South Carolina from 1989-1994.Born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, on July 11, 1947, he graduated from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1969. He earned his Master of Divinity degree from Virginia Theological Seminary in 1974.As third bishop of East Tennessee, he oversaw an area of 34 counties in Tennessee and three in North Georgia, with 45 congregations and five worshiping communities and nearly 16,000 active members.The South Carolina release said his tenure in East Tennessee “was marked by a measured approach and a focus on reconciliation and relationship,” adding that he “worked to acknowledge diversity and build a spirit of openness in the diocese, initiating a Bishop’s Committee on Inclusivity in 2009 to encourage ‘reasonable and holy conversations’ on same-gender relationships.” He also was “noted for putting a priority on pastoral sensitivity and responsiveness, especially to clergy, their families and churches,” the release said. House of Bishops, January 10, 2013 at 8:18 pm I look forward to a renewed sense of connection with the Body of Christ that is the National Episcopal Church. It’s like emerging from the darkness into the light. I have no doubt that the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina will be in sure, safe hands under the leadership and guidance of The Right Rev. Charles vonRosenberg. Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Steven Long says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Duane Miller says: Sarah Hey says: Comments (34) January 10, 2013 at 5:26 pm That’s “faithfully,” not “faithjully.” Sorry for the typo! ………………….-T- South Carolina Joseph F Foster says: Rector Bath, NC January 11, 2013 at 4:48 am As an Episcopalian living outside of the USA I have mixed feelings about this. I suppose that the best thing I can say is that the dioceses that were going to leave have left (or as in the case of SC, forced out, it appears). The whole affair has been sordid and I am ashamed for my church, especially by the the Presiding Bishop’s activities which strike me as deceitful and conniving. I will be curious to see if these 19 parishes can become a growing and flourishing diocese, as SC was the last one left in TEC-USA (and I do mean regular, year-on-year numerical growth).It will take many millions of dollars though before the whole affair is over. Best case scenario is TEC gets a bunch of empty churches. It is hard to see how that is a victory for the Gospel. Duane Miller says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem J M Stevenson says: Ann Lamb says: January 11, 2013 at 6:30 am And you don’t think that Mark Lawrence has been “deceitful and conniving?” ( I am not going to lead the diocese out of TEC etc Rector Collierville, TN January 11, 2013 at 9:36 am Biblical metaphor of the Serpent? That’s how many of us on our Standing Committee felt – duped and deceived and disappointed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing January 10, 2013 at 4:35 pm Bishop Charlie is an excellent choice for this position and will provide leadership that is healing, reconciling and sensitive. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET J M Stevenson says: January 10, 2013 at 4:25 pm South Carolina will be very fortunate! January 10, 2013 at 5:24 pm “Progressive”?Or accomodationationist? Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Charles vonRosenberg nominated as South Carolina bishop provisional Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img January 10, 2013 at 5:23 pm If Charlie is confirmed as the interim bishop, the diocese will be truly blessed. He is committed to and understands the mission of the Church: “to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ.” He is a reconciler. My favorite quote of his, spoken in one of his sermons, is: “The radical message of Christianity–when it is preached and lived faithjully–is that Jesus Christ sees the world through the eyes of the powerless.”…………………………God speed and God give you peace and all good. –just tupper January 11, 2013 at 11:29 am Hooray for Charlie Von Rosenberg, who will lead us here in SC faithfully and well. As for Mark Lawrence and his [people], perhaps Jon Stewart has described their actions well when he said, “YOU HAVE CONFUSED AN ATTACK ON YOUR RELIGION, WITH NOT ALWAYS GETTING YOUR WAY”. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ronald J. Caldwell says: Bruce Walker says: Sam Liggett says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET January 12, 2013 at 2:48 pm As revisionists keep mistaking their own theological wish list and experiments for movements of the Holy Spirit I notice that we shrink and shrink yet more in participation and interest as a larger church and people think more parochially. That’s telling. Only those who frequent meetings and circles of influence are hopeful enough to believe that most people in the pew give any concern to what they do among themselves. It seems that most people just want the nightmarish divisiveness gone as they focus on their own church circle. I just wish that the General Convention passes a resolution making General Convention an every 6 year event so that this Church can do some healing. And then the Executive Council needs to keep their place and not veto by passivity or obfuscation the mandates given to them. I don’t think that this Church can take any more of the progressive agenda including a revised Hymnal or Prayer Book , complete with a change in the meaning of marriage. Let’s face it: the so-called provisional use of a Service for same-gender blessings is not the stopping place. That’s the warm-up by Integrity and other well-organized entities (even outside of our Church) that want to see us become THE Church that erases “man and woman” from our marriage canons and services. Let’s not forget that the very predictably one-sided “study” given to us of same gender blessings was partially funded by efforts of secular groups with a stake at using us for their agenda. More and more is continually demanded at the expense of the unity of the Church. The message received is that the conservatives seem to matter to keep around just to give the revisionists some credibility for being inclusive…as the revisionists veto or wither by annoyance until their point prevail. As one older preacher said so eloquently: “I think some of us have been livin’ too much in the world”. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET January 11, 2013 at 10:56 am As long as we keep bringing up the past, we will be held captive. May I point out that +Charles (he really likes “Charlie” better) is one of the finest bishops of the church and we will all benefit from his gentle, faithful touch as this diocese moves into the new day. Thank you, Charles for coming out of retirement for this Church! Carol McRee says: January 11, 2013 at 3:07 pm The PB and her handful of dissidents are whistling past the graveyard with this absurd charade. TEC may be unable (or unwilling) to follow its own constitution and canons, but I suspect that it shall soon find out that South Carolina courts are not so cavalier about enforcing the state’s own corporate laws.Mr Garner, you write, “The property and assets belong to a common ownership under the flag of The Episcopal Church.” Surely you are not so delusional as to believe that TEC is a sovereign nation (and a totalitarian one at that–if it were, its “citizens” wouldn’t be leaving by the bucket-loads, as they currently are). But judging from the rest of your comment, perhaps you are. Sic transit gloria mundi. Rector Shreveport, LA Ronald J. Caldwell says: Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest January 10, 2013 at 11:33 pm Unfortunately, I have seen more up close and personal than I would like the realities of the situation. This is not a theological “thing” with them. It is a power and control issue for them centering around an attitude that the church must be run by white males who are (at least allegedly) straight. I’ve witnessed their lack of respect for women clergy – and yes I know they do have some and I fear for their emotional safety. They are not actually interested in any form of reconciliation or meeting of the minds or even mutual accommodation that involves folks with whom they do not agree. Time and again they were told that they had a place at the table and it would be kept open for them. They made the decision not to sit at the table. And I am referring to more than just the empty table at Province IV Synods where a place was reserved for the Diocese of South Carolina. Attempts were made at numerous levels to reach some form of agreement but it was only acceptable to them on their own terms and not any that involved give and take or that remotely looked like reconciliation. The attitude is that “we have all the right answers and we will not budge from our position.”It is always sad when people decide to leave. But remember, people may leave any time they wish. They may not take property and assets with them, even if they are bishop or priest or chair of a standing committee. The property and assets belong to a common ownership under the flag of The Episcopal Church.If this really was an action based on theology, why would they not just walk away and start an “Anglican” church somewhere else? If it wasn’t about power and control, the property and assets would not matter. The atmosphere of tightly controlling information that goes out is just another way of exercising control. The same situation was prevelant in all of the other dioceses where the leadership decided to leave and try to take what was not theirs to take.I think many fail to recognize what is really behind the situation in South Carolina….and it was no different than the situations in Pittsburg, San Joaquin, Ft. Worth, Quincy and other places who claimed a similar position. I learned more than I ever wanted to know during my tenure on Executive Council when we had to deal with the aftermath.We can be together if we want to be together. We can sit at the same table if we want to sit at the same table. Some of us continue to save seats at the table….but our very presence keeps others from sitting down. Is there anything theological or Biblical about that? I can’t find it. The closest I can see in a comparable situation was when people of color sat at tables and lunch room counters and white folks got up and left. Funny how both happened in similar places.The reality is that the Diocese of South Carolina violated the Canons and Constitution they had vowed to uphold when they removed references to the Episcopal Church from their own canons and constitution. Mark Lawrence abandoned the communion and effectively renounced his vows as a bishop in TEC by his own words and statements. No one forced those words from his mouth or from his pen (computer). It was his choice and he made it. Now he has to live with the consequences. I wish those who followed him well. They are all still my brothers and sisters in Christ. They are welcome in my home AND in my parish….even though the reciprocal is not true. Featured Events Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska January 10, 2013 at 5:04 pm It is so sad that this all came about. I’m currently on my 3d tour on Standing Committee of our Diocese in Central PA. (I’ll be 80 by the time my tour is up!) We had our doubts about Mark Lawrence when he was first put forth to be Bishop of SC. However, his comments and remarks were overly nuanced and we were aware of anecdotal information for some time that the Standing Committee of SC was searching for someone to lead them out of ECUSA. The second go-round the followng year resulted in a split vote (consents among us just made the majority required) and was based on assurances to our Bishop by then Fr. Lawrence that it was not his intent to lead the diocese out of ECUSA. I see no grace in all of this rancor precipitated by Diocese of SC except that we must be assured that the Holy Spirit is leading us in these matters (even though it might appear He/She may be perceived to speak differently to different parties). It just seems to run against the Anglican ethos of one big umbrella embracing the spectrum of conservatives to progressives alike; we all come to the Table as one. It should be noted that Christianity over the centuries indeed has a progressive bent and we are not all “Luddites”, if you will. Godspeed to continuing Diocese of SC. January 10, 2013 at 7:16 pm I wish him well as they unsnarl that mess. Rector Washington, DC January 13, 2013 at 2:49 pm What is so strange about his recommendation as Bishop ? He appears to be well liked and committed to the Episcopal Church (TEC). That is what we expect of our Bishops. January 10, 2013 at 6:04 pm So the non diocese has been given a name for a provisional bishop in violation of TEC’s own cannons…… I would expect nothing else from this group that ignores any and all rules. Remember this is largely the same group who brought Lawrence not once…. not twice…… but three times up on disciplinary charges. Fortunately THE Diocese of South Carolina is doing just fine. We all wish them well ….. just please get your own identity and stop using someone else’s! January 10, 2013 at 6:13 pm Cannons? Or is that a pun (shades of Ft Sumter!) ? John Neir says: Rector Martinsville, VA John Neir says: Bryan Hunter says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ February 2, 2013 at 10:59 pm I’m quite confident that Bishop vonRosenberg will do for the Episcopal Church in South Carolina just what he did for the Diocese of East Tennessee — ASA in 2001 of around 6500 [undoubtedly more in 1999 when the bishop was consecrated], and ASA in 2011 when he departed of around 5500.Not a bad decline, for TEC dioceses led by revisionists.It’s a good, solid choice and very fitting for the new organization in SC. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By ENS staffPosted Jan 10, 2013 John Neir says: Christopher Cleveland says: January 24, 2013 at 4:15 pm John Neir: “well liked and committed to the TEC”? Is that all that is required to be bishop? I thought they have to be ministers of the Gospel who preach the true and lively Word. Anyway, he won’t be bishop of the Diocese of SC in his life time when the SC courts get through with the TEC. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bruce Green says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC J M Stevenson says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI January 11, 2013 at 8:11 pm Bruce, bravo! Thank you for this thoughtful, heartfelt, and well-written comment. I could not agree with you more. I feel as if after years of strormy darkness, a dawn of light is breaking and peace and reconciliation will arise again as the faithful, long-suffering Episcopalians of South Carolina rebuild a great diocese under the leadership of a remarkable bishop. January 14, 2013 at 11:55 am Well, the decision to elect a new Bishop for the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina rests with those who are in communion with TEC and so perhaps in time, under Bishop Von Rosenberg, the diocese will once again flourish. We are all Anglicans….lets remember that. Doug Desper says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books January 22, 2013 at 5:12 pm This was all brought about by the PB, who has spent millions litigating ($23mm) and forcing conservative Episcopalians out of the church. She’s an angry person with no regard for the rule of law and hell bent on getting her way. She’s over played her hand in SC and has met her match as the South Carolinians will send her back to NYC only she payes compensatory and exemplary damages, which are surely to result from their splendid strategy. The Denis Cannon will not be upheld in SC courts (it wasn’t when both the Diocese of SC and ECUS were plaintiffs in the All Saints Pawleys Island case) and it looks like it’s in danger in Texas and perhaps in Virginia (the Commonwealth appellate court has agreed to review the Fairfax case). Also, litigation enforcing corporate church ownership was recently dimissed out of an Oregon court. At any outcome, the ECUS will continue a slow and sad death as they spend millions of dollars to enforce their ‘our way or the highway’ doctrine. So much for the diversity they expouse. Be careful as Ms. Jefforts Shori may be visiting your diocese if you don’t kiss her cassock! Maxine Schell says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY January 24, 2013 at 11:49 am ENS may want to pull or revise this post given the South Carolina Circuit Court’s Temporary Restraining Order issued yesterday. TEC may declare vonRosenberg bishop of something, but that something won’t be The Diocese of South Carolina. The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina has a bishop, and he is The Rt. Rev. Mark Lawrence. As Judge Goodstein concluded in her ruling, “AND IT IS SO ORDERED!”http://www.diosc.com/sys/images/documents/tec/tro_1_23_13.pdf January 14, 2013 at 3:41 pm Duane,I second with your thoughts and sentiments on the South Carolina debacle.Thank you for your voice and integrity. I too am ashamed of how TEC has bullied this diocese. Mike Lawlor says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more