In numbers: South Africa’s global competitiveness

first_imgMary AlexanderThe World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Index ranks South Africa as the 56th most competitive economy out of 144 countries, the highest standing on the African continent (the island of Mauritius comes in at 39) and ahead of its Brics developing economy partners India and Brazil.While the country’s competitive rating has slipped from the 50th position it held in 2011/12, it still punches way above its weight in certain areas, particularly the development of its financial market. For the strength of its business auditing and reporting standards, and the regulation of its securities exchanges, South Africa is ranked first in the world.The full rankings are below.GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS INDEX – OVERALL INDICATORSPILLARSCORERANKGCI 2014–2015 4.456 Basic requirements (40.0%) 4.389 Institutions 4.536 Infrastructure 4.360 Macroeconomic environment 4.589 Health and primary education 4.0132 Efficiency enhancers (50.0%) 4.443 Higher education and training 4.086 Goods market efficiency 4.732 Labour market efficiency 3.8113 Financial market development 5.47 Technological readiness 3.966 Market size 4.925 Innovation and sophistication factors (10.0%) 4.137 Business sophistication 4.531 Innovation 3.643 GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS INDEX – DETAILED INDICATORSPILLAR 1: INSTITUTIONSITEMSCORERANK1.01 Property rights 5.6 201.02 Intellectual property protection 5.3 221.03 Diversion of public funds 2.8 961.04 Public trust in politicians 2.6 901.05 Irregular payments and bribes 4.5 481.06 Judicial independence 5.4 241.07 Favouritism in decisions of government officials 2.6 1041.08 Wastefulness of government spending 2.8 891.09 Burden of government regulation 2.8 1201.10 Efficiency of legal framework in settling disputes 5.2 151.11 Efficiency of legal framework in challenging regs. 4.9 91.12 Transparency of government policymaking 4.5 351.13 Business costs of terrorism 6.0 301.14 Business costs of crime and violence 2.8 1331.15 Organized crime 4.3 991.16 Reliability of police services 3.6 1021.17 Ethical behaviour of firms 4.7 351.18 Strength of auditing and reporting standards 6.7 11.19 Efficacy of corporate boards 6.0 31.20 Protection of minority shareholders’ interests 6.1 21.21 Strength of investor protection, 0–10 (best)* 8.0 10 PILLAR 2: INFRASTRUCTUREITEMSCORERANK2.01 Quality of overall infrastructure 4.5 592.02 Quality of roads 4.9 372.03 Quality of railroad infrastructure 3.4 442.04 Quality of port infrastructure 4.9 462.05 Quality of air transport infrastructure 6.0 112.06 Available airline seat km/week, millions* 1,117.0 282.07 Quality of electricity supply 3.6 992.08 Mobile telephone subscriptions/100 pop.* 147.5 252.09 Fixed telephone lines/100 pop.* 9.2 90 PILLAR 3: MACROECONOMIC ENVIRONMENTITEMSCORERANK3.01 Government budget balance, % GDP* –4.3 973.02 Gross national savings, % GDP* 13.5 1193.03 Inflation, annual % change* 5.8 1023.04 General government debt, % GDP* 45.2 773.05 Country credit rating, 0–100 (best)* 59.1 51 PILLAR 4: HEALTH AND PRIMARY EDUCATIONITEMSCORERANK4.01 Malaria cases/100,000 pop.* 32.5 274.02 Business impact of malaria 5.1 304.03 Tuberculosis cases/100,000 pop.* 1,003.0 1434.04 Business impact of tuberculosis 3.7 1364.05 HIV prevalence, % adult pop.* 17.9 1404.06 Business impact of HIV/AIDS 3.4 1364.07 Infant mortality, deaths/1,000 live births* 33.3 1054.08 Life expectancy, years* 56.1 1294.09 Quality of primary education 2.4 1334.10 Primary education enrolment, net %* 85.0 118 PILLAR 5: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAININGITEMSCORERANK5.01 Secondary education enrolment, gross %* 101.9 245.02 Tertiary education enrolment, gross %* 19.2 935.03 Quality of the education system 2.2 1405.04 Quality of math and science education 1.9 1445.05 Quality of management schools 5.2 245.06 Internet access in schools 3.2 1175.07 Availability of research and training services 4.5 445.08 Extent of staff training 4.9 18 PILLAR 6: GOODS MARKET EFFICIENCYITEMSCORERANK6.01 Intensity of local competition 5.5 366.02 Extent of market dominance 4.0 486.03 Effectiveness of anti-monopoly policy 5.1 146.04 Effect of taxation on incentives to invest 4.3 266.05 Total tax rate, % profits* 30.1 416.06 No. procedures to start a business* 5 326.07 No. days to start a business* 19.0 906.08 Agricultural policy costs 3.9 656.09 Prevalence of trade barriers 4.8 236.10 Trade tariffs, % duty* 6.0 766.11 Prevalence of foreign ownership 5.1 426.12 Business impact of rules on FDI 4.0 1046.13 Burden of customs procedures 4.1 626.14 Imports as a percentage of GDP* 40.7 856.15 Degree of customer orientation 4.6 676.16 Buyer sophistication 4.0 31 PILLAR 7: LABOUR MARKET EFFICIENCYITEMSCORERANK7.01 Cooperation in labour-employer relations 2.5 1447.02 Flexibility of wage determination 2.7 1397.03 Hiring and firing practices 2.1 1437.04 Redundancy costs, weeks of salary* 9.3 337.05 Effect of taxation on incentives to work 4.5 157.06 Pay and productivity 2.7 1367.07 Reliance on professional management 5.5 217.08 Country capacity to retain talent 3.7 507.09 Country capacity to attract talent 3.9 397.10 Women in labour force, ratio to men* 0.77 84 PILLAR 8: FINANCIAL MARKET DEVELOPMENTITEMSCORERANK8.01 Availability of financial services 6.1 68.02 Affordability of financial services 5.3 218.03 Financing through local equity market 5.4 38.04 Ease of access to loans 3.5 328.05 Venture capital availability 3.2 378.06 Soundness of banks 6.5 68.07 Regulation of securities exchanges 6.4 18.08 Legal rights index, 0–10 (best)* 7 43 PILLAR 9: TECHNOLOGICAL READINESSITEMSCORERANK9.01 Availability of latest technologies 5.5 399.02 Firm-level technology absorption 5.4 299.03 FDI and technology transfer 4.8 509.04 Individuals using Internet, %* 48.9 699.05 Fixed broadband Internet subscriptions/100 pop.* 3.1 899.06 Int’l Internet bandwidth, kb/s per user* 3.7 1269.07 Mobile broadband subscriptions/100 pop.* 25.2 74 PILLAR 10: MARKET SIZEITEMSCORERANK10.01 Domestic market size index, 1–7 (best)* 4.8 2410.02 Foreign market size index, 1–7 (best)* 5.3 3410.03 GDP (PPP$ billions)* 596.5 2510.04 Exports as a percentage of GDP* 31.3 92 PILLAR 11: BUSINESS SOPHISTICATIONITEMSCORERANK11.01 Local supplier quantity 4.8 4711.02 Local supplier quality 4.9 3811.03 State of cluster development 4.2 4411.04 Nature of competitive advantage 3.7 6211.05 Value chain breadth 3.8 6811.06 Control of international distribution 4.4 3511.07 Production process sophistication 4.5 3811.08 Extent of marketing 5.2 2411.09 Willingness to delegate authority 4.5 27 PILLAR 12: INNOVATIONITEMSCORERANK12.01 Capacity for innovation 4.3 3512.02 Quality of scientific research institutions 4.7 3412.03 Company spending on R&D 3.4 4812.04 University-industry collaboration in R&D 4.5 3112.05 Gov’t procurement of advanced tech products 3.0 11212.06 Availability of scientists and engineers 3.5 10212.07 PCT patents, applications/million pop.* 6.5 45last_img read more

Rigging the ring! Dubious decisions irk Sarita Devi, Devendro Singh

first_imgSarita Devi and Devendro Singh succumbed to controversial decision in boxing eventsThe Indian boxing contingent was left heartbroken after dubious decisions against L Sarita Devi and Devendro Singh Laishram denied the progress of the two boxers in their respective events on Tuesday.Sarita Devi was left in tears after she was adjudged to have lost despite a dominating performance in the women’s lightweight semifinal against home favourite Jina Park while Devendro Singh also succumbed to an umpiring howler against South Korea’s Shin Jonghun in quarterfinal of the men’s light flyweight.The lightweight boxer, Sarita Devi, had matched Park blow for blow in the opening round and was markedly more aggressive and precise thereafter.Sarita, a former Asian champion, fell behind after a rather bizarre turn of events in which Park ended up being the judges’ choice despite barely managing to stay in the fight.Such was the Indian’s ferocity that Park resorted to holding to slow down the pace of the bout after being left with a bloodied nose.But Sarita’s precision and her brilliant ring craft failed to find favour with the judges in the third and fourth rounds which went to the home favourite, who was struggling to stand up to the onslaught of punches from the Manipuri.Sarita Devi being consoled by her husband after being knocked out of the boxing semifinalOn the other hand, Devendro Singh lost 0-3 against his Korean rival despite dominating the second and third round in the quarterfinal. The judges ruled the bout in favour of the Korean boxer in what looked like another games marred by dodgy decisions.advertisementMiffed by the decisions, the Indian boxing contingent lodged a protest after paying a non-refundable USD 500 fee. However, it ended up being for a lost cause as the International Boxing Association’s(AIBA) technical committee rules bar any complaints against judges and protests can only be filed against decision of the referees.Meanwhile, Sarita found support from India’s long-time Cuban coach BI Fernandes and fellow boxer MC Mary Kom, who advanced to the final.”It was pre-decided, the 3-0 verdict is a clear cut indication. The Korean deserved to have been given many standing counts, going by what happened in the ring, and the bout should have been stopped,” Fernandes said.”Sarita was a clear-cut winner but money has talked here and the judges deserve to be thrown out. It happened in Seoul during the 1988 Olympic Games, it’s happening now again.Nothing seems to have changed. The new rules have made no difference,” he fumed.Sarita’s incident, however, wasn’t the only case of the dubious boxing scoring. Moment’s after the Indian’s bout, a Mongolian boxer couldn’t believe that the judges ruled against his favour.The Mongolians were up for a fight and decided to withdraw their entire boxing team as a mark of protest. Unlike the Indian contingent, the Mongolian Chef de Mission, Contingent leader and everyone took the AIBA head on.Amateur boxing last year moved to a pro-style, 10-point scoring system, discarding the latest version of the much-criticized computer punch-count systems implemented after the Seoul Olympics in 1988.last_img read more