Taking out Rohit Sharma, Shikhar Dhawan early was massive: Colin Munro

first_imgCenturion Colin Munro said dismissing the in-form India openers early was “massive” and credited their “outstanding” bowling attack for New Zealand’s 40-run win in the second T20 International here.Left-arm pace bowler Trent Boult sent back openers Shikhar Dhawan and Rohit Sharma in the second over to leave the hosts struggling at 11-2, chasing an imposing score of 196-2, built mainly on Munro’s belligerent knock of 109 not out that contained 7 sixes and as many fours.”(It was) massive. (Grabbing) wickets halts the momentum of the team and those two players are in good form like we saw in the first T20,” said Munro in the post-game press conference.”They put on a record partnership (158) and for Trent to come out, stand up and lead the attack like he did tonight was outstanding. As was Adam Milne.”To come out and bowl like they did gave us a lot of momentum and belief and then the spinners (Mitchell Santner and Ish Sodhi) could come in and do their thing knowing that they were behind required rate from the start,” added the South Africa-born player.India’s run-chase was halted at 156 for 7 as the visitors notched up a resounding 40-run victory after they had suffered a 53-run loss in the series opener at Delhi. The deciding last game will be played on November 7 at Thiruvananthapuram.On his own sensational knock, man of the match Munro, only the fourth batsman to score two T20 hundreds, said he relished the shortest form of the game.advertisement”I enjoy Twenty20, it’s a game where you know it’s a short game and you go out there to express yourself and when it comes off, it comes off. Sometimes you put too much pressure on yourself in the longer form where you’ve got to score runs all the time,” he said.”In Twenty20, you just got to go out there and express yourself and take the good with the bad. Sometimes it comes off like it did tonight and the other night it didn’t come off. You just got to go with the flow.”Talking about his two T20 centuries, Munro said: “Obviously the first hundred you score for your country, it always means a lot against Bangladesh. Again to come to India, play against a tough opposition and score a hundred and bat throughout the innings, means a heck of a lot.”The wicket was very good. I thought, when the bowlers bowled back of a length, changed their pace a little bit with a straighter line, I did find it quite tough to score. We bowled outstandingly well,” he added.The left-handed batsman, who put on a century stand (105) with fellow-opener Martin Guptill (45 in 41 balls), said the they have a good understanding.”I think Guppy had a lot of the strike early and he got off to a good start. He said the wicket was good so just play your natural game. And that helps me, Guppy facing the first couple of balls. I think that’s a tough role because wicket could be sticky, skiddy, so he enjoys taking the first ball.”The communication we have at the top of the order and throughout our batting is key in order to make (set up) those big targets. Guppy and I get along really well and it just naturally happens,” he said.Munro also heaped praise on Santner and Sodhi, saying the two complemented each other well.”Spinners were outstanding, I think. You saw them bowl in the T20 World Cup here and they were outstanding. In any conditions, those two have bowled really well in tandem. They come from the same association back home, Northern Districts,” he said.”They’re always talking to each other as well, on and off the field about what pace to bowl and what areas to bowl to certain batters. I think they just feed off each other,” said the Durban-born batsman.The Black Caps surprisingly left out wicket keeper and in-form batsman Tom Latham, described by Indian left arm spinner Axar Patel as the visitors’ best player of spin.”I think it’s a tough one on Tommy. He has been an outstanding batter on this tour so far. I think it’s just that both keepers are different kind of a bat, and I think they went with Glenn (Phillips) because of a different skill set.”Maybe batting towards the death, few more options I think, I’m not too sure exactly, but that’s my take on it.last_img read more

Flying Tomato Loses to I-Pod Kid

first_imgTweetPinShare0 Shares KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia – Shaun White lost to a kid they call the “I-Pod,” and now, he may never hear the end of it.How big of an Olympic shocker was this? White, the best snowboarder of his era and one of the best-known and best-marketed athletes at the Sochi Games, didn’t even win a medal. He finished fourth.The 27-year-old American, who opted out of the Olympic slopestyle debut and put all his chips in the halfpipe, where he hoped to win a third straight gold medal, got knocked off by Iouri Podladtchikov, the Russian-born inventor of the “Yolo,” the trick that White could not master.“I’m disappointed,” White said. “I hate the fact I nailed it in practice, but it happens. It’s hard to be consistent.”The Japanese pair of 15-year-old Ayumu Hirano and 18-year-old Taku Hiraoka won silver and bronze, and the Americans were shut out on the halfpipe for the first time since the sport was introduced to the Olympics in 1998.Podladtchikov, who now lives in and competes for Switzerland, landed the trick successfully at an event in Europe last season, but hadn’t done it since.“I’m about to faint. I haven’t seen the gold yet,” said Podladtchikov, who gets his gold on Feb. 12.. “That’s why I don’t believe it.”White watched the replay of I-Pod’s trick last March on his computer and went to work trying to match it.He landed it twice in qualifying events and was listed as the heavy favorite to become the seventh person to win three straight gold medals in an individual event at the Winter Games.White had come to Russia hoping to win two gold medals, but when he pulled out of the Olympics’ inaugural slopestyle contest, saying he didn’t want to risk injury for his historic quest on the halfpipe, the stakes were set.It unraveled early.On White’s first of two runs in the final, his attempt at the Yolo ended with a fall that left him sliding down the halfpipe on his backside. Even though his chance at putting up a winning score was over, he tried to finish the run with another of his double-cork tricks. White wasn’t close — his board slammed on the lip of the pipe, followed by an awkward and painful fall onto his rear.I-Pod had scored an 86.5 in his first run — clearly in medal contention — and then won it on his second attempt. The Yolo includes a total of 1440 degrees of spin — two head-over-heels flips and two 360-degree turns.Four years ago, it was unthinkable, but not anymore. He landed it and even though he only threw five tricks, when most riders were trying six in a supersized, super-slushy halfpipe, the judges liked what they saw.As did I-Pod, who spiked his snowboard into the ground like a football and threw his goggles into the crowd.“He’s incredible,” American Danny Davis, the 10th-place finisher, said of Podladtchikov. “That run on that halfpipe. Wow.”I-Pod struggled in the qualifying round earlier, forcing him into a semifinal round while the White and the five other top scorers went directly to the final. The extra runs seemed to help, as did the cold night air which seemed to improve the condition of the halfpipe, which competitors had been complaining about all week.I-Pod scored 87.50 on his first semifinal run, clearing his way to the final. His 94.75 in the second final run huge pressure on White, whose final runs at the last two Olympics have been nothing more than pressure-free victory rides.White stood at the top of the halfpipe, high-fived and bumped knuckles with his coach, clapped his hands and away he went.The first two jumps were flawless — higher than anyone and landed more solidly.Then, the Yolo. Tucking his hands together to generate torque, then waving one like a cowboy riding a bucking bronc, the form looked good during his three seconds in the air.But on the landing, he skittered down the pipe and lost speed, which meant he lost height on the next jump, as well.The landing on his last double cork was less than perfect, too — his knees buckled and nearly touched the snow. Across the finish line, White raised one finger in the air and raised his hands in victory. Yes, sometimes judges reward athletes for what they’ve done, not what they just did.Not this time. White’s fourth-place score, a 90.25, came up, and he broke into a big smile. He gave Podladtchikov a big hug and fatherly mussed his hair. That kid earned it. And the champion had nothing to complain about.“I saw videos of Shaun doing it really well,” I-Pod said. “I got bummed, said, ‘Damn, that’s my trick and he’s doing it better than me. Today, I guess I was doing it a little better.”(Eddie Pells, AP National Writer)last_img read more