Rumors Are Swirling About Urban Meyer’s Future At Ohio State

first_imgA closeup of Urban Meyer during an Ohio State football game.GLENDALE, AZ – JANUARY 01: Head coach Urban Meyer of the Ohio State Buckeyes on the sidelines during the BattleFrog Fiesta Bowl against the Notre Dame Fighting Irish at University of Phoenix Stadium on January 1, 2016 in Glendale, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)Rumors are swirling about the future of Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer following a telling report that surfaced on Friday morning.Meyer, who’s dealt with quite a bit during the 2018 college football season, has reportedly told Ohio State’s athletic department that the 2019 season will be his final one in Columbus, Ohio. The Buckeyes are reportedly planning on keeping offensive coordinator Ryan Day as his potential replacement.Football Scoop reported the news on Friday morning.With that said, sources tell FootballScoop Ohio State is taking Ryan Day off the job market, with a significant raise coming and with the (most likely) unwritten understanding that he is in line to become head coach once Urban steps down. What’s that you say? Urban stepping down? So about that…While Urban has stated repeatedly publicly that he plans to coach next year, sources tell FootballScoop that the Ohio State head coach continues to contemplate his future on an ongoing basis, and we hear he has told Gene Smith that he doesn’t expect to continue to coach past the 2019 season. One source told us we should expect Urban to address this in the days following Saturday’s Big Ten Championship.Meyer was asked about this report on Friday ahead of the Big Ten Championship Game.“No comment,” he said.Ohio State’s athletic director, meanwhile, denied the news.“Have seen [the report] and been asked, no truth to it,” Ohio State athletic director Smith wrote in a text message to ESPN’s Heather Dinich. “Urban and I have not talked about that.”OK then.Meyer and Ohio State are set to play in the Big Ten Championship Game this evening. The Buckeyes and the Northwestern Wildcats are set to kick off at 8 p.m. E.T. The game will be on FOX.last_img read more

Prince Harry to open memorial to 31 British victims who died in

The Duke of Sussex will officially open a memorial to 31 British victims of two terrorist attacks in Tunisia, Kensington Palace has announced.The memorial commemorates the 30 British victims of the Sousse attack at a popular coastal holiday resort in 2015, as well as a UK national who died in an attack at the Bardo Museum in Tunis earlier the same year.The commemorative sculpture, called Infinite Wave, will overlook a lake in Birmingham’s Cannon Hill Park and comprise 31 individual streams, with each representing the loss of a British life.A number of the victims had links to the Midlands, including 70-year-old former Birmingham City footballer Denis Thwaites and his wife Elaine, 69.The duke will attend a ceremony to officially open the memorial on March 4 and attend a reception where he will meet some of the families of those affected.In 2016 Harry gave a reading at a service for the victims at Westminster Abbey in London.The sculpture, which was designed by London and Gloucester-based George King Architects, was chosen ahead of 19 other entries by an independent panel, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office said.Relatives of the victims were consulted on its design and location. Suzy Richards, who lost three members of her family in the attack, has previously described the memorial as representing “our never-ending love and beautiful memories we treasure”.As part of his visit to Birmingham, the duke will also visit The Scar Free Foundation Centre for Conflict Wound Research at Queen Elizabeth Hospital.The centre aims to minimise the psychological and physical impact of scarring among armed forces personnel and civilians wounded in terrorist attacks.The Royal Foundation gave funding to the CASEVAC Club, which helped to set up the centre and aims to provide wounded personnel with a close-knit, supportive community and assist in the advancement of treatments. read more