Panel discusses gender and politics in the Andes

first_imgSubject of the documentaries “Soy Andina” and “Soy Andina II: The Return,” Nelida Silva spoke alongside associate producer of both films, Doris Loayza, and associate political science professor Guillermo Trejo in a panel discussion that examined local politics and gender in rural Peru.Silva said she was born and raised in the rural Andean town of Llamellin, Peru but moved to New York when she was young and lived there for 20 years. In New York, Silva said she worked as an accountant before eventually returning to her hometown.“I decided to back to my village to teach women, so they could earn some money,” she said.Silva said she was proposed as a candidate for mayor of Llamellin, though she initially struggled to decide whether or not to run for office.“I wasn’t sure,” she said. “Candidates are seen as corrupt people.”The documentary “Soy Andina II: The Return” details Silva’s campaign to be mayor. Silva said she ran on a platform of economic development and ultimately lost the election.Traditional gender roles often deter women from becoming involved in politics, but her candidacy demonstrates women’s capabilities, Silva said.“Despite the macho system, which is dominated by males, there is more space for women,” she said. “However, there were more receptive young people — some men, too, but not those who had a [stake] in politics.”Loayza said producing a movie featuring Silva’s political campaign was an arduous task that presented constant challenges, especially in terms of objectivity.“My role was not easy,” Loayza said. “We had to be objective.”Loayza said making two films about the same place brought about some challenges, especially concerning the locals’ perceptions of the documentaries.“The townspeople were developing the idea that the footage from the town was going to be big and disseminated internationally, which made it hard,” she said.Trejo said the film almost never discusses the country of Peru at large because Peruvian politics has a “more local dimension.”“There’s this idea that you leave but you never leave,” he said, “We are living in a reality with the question of universal citizenship. We are not trees. You don’t belong to one place.”According to Trejo, Silva’s gender played an integral role in the success of her campaign.“[Silva] was facing two enemies: political machines and the question of gender,” Trejo said. “It was interesting and infuriating. It is hard for a woman to be heard — not to speak up, because she was, but the audience wasn’t listening. It doesn’t matter if you have the [microphone].”Tags: Documentary, Peru, soy andinalast_img read more

What credit unions need to know about cannabis banking during the COVID-19 crisis

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Paul Dunford Paul is a co-founder & director of program development. Paul oversees the development and management of compliance programs for Green Check’s clients, with a focus on state-level compliance as … Web: https://www.greencheckverified.com Details I doubt whether it’s possible to find an industry that has not had to adjust in response to the COVID-19 crisis and that’s certainly the case with cannabis. With marijuana legal in some form (medical and/or adult-use) in 33 states and the District of Columbia, marijuana-related businesses (MRBs) play a significant role in local economies across the country, contributing tax revenue and offering employment in dispensaries, grow facilities and myriad ancillary businesses that support them. So, let’s look at how COVID-19 has affected MRBs, and why that’s potentially important to your credit union.Business ImpactMost states that have legalized marijuana have designated MRBs essential during this crisis so many have remained open when other businesses have had to close their doors. They have had to adjust to accommodate public health and social distancing concerns, so their day-to-day operations have had to change accordingly, but their sales have remained strong and largely returned to pre-crisis levels following an initial spike. What we’ve seen in practice is that operating models that weren’t previously legal or common under state programs, like curb-side sales and home deliveries, are now the norm.That’s not to say that marijuana-related businesses aren’t facing their own set of challenges. Notable among them is that they aren’t eligible to participate in any of the current federal stimulus programs, like SBA Loans or the Payroll Protection Program, because marijuana businesses remain federally illegal. However, the cannabis industry is pushing back hard against this restriction, citing their status as essential at the state level.Why does this matter to credit unions?If your credit union is already banking MRBs, you should reach out to them to understand how their operations have changed in response to public health concerns and check with your state cannabis authority to see how its program has been adjusted. For instance, medical marijuana businesses may be considered essential but adult-use ones may not.  Also, keep in mind that while these businesses have stayed strong during the crisis, should they find themselves struggling, they aren’t currently able to take advantage of federal stimulus programs.If your credit union has yet to engage with the cannabis industry because of concerns that it would negatively affect your reputation, the fact that many states consider MRBs to be essential demonstrates that the industry is far less taboo than it once was. If the fear of being the “weed credit union” has kept you from offering accounts to MRBs it may be time to reconsider that risk.State Legislative ImpactAt the start of the year, there were 31 formal ballot initiatives on the books in 15 states related to the legalization or decriminalization of marijuana, and the odds were that several of them would pass. In the Northeast, common wisdom was that New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut would pass adult-use (recreational) marijuana programs this year, but that’s no longer the case. As legislators have had to understandably refocus their efforts on mitigating the devastating effects of the coronavirus, most if not all of these initiatives are in a sort of limbo, where they are not technically off the agenda but unlikely to come up to a vote before the end of the current session. This has even delayed the rollout of programs that have already been approved, as in the case of Maine where their adult-use program was expected to go live early this summer but has now been postponed.Why does this matter to credit unions?Credit unions that anticipated the opportunity to expand their membership and open new cannabis business accounts may be disappointed this year because it is unlikely that states will expand the scope of their programs.Federal Legislative ImpactOn the federal level, the SAFE Banking Act, legislation that would provide regulatory and law-enforcement protection for financial institutions that provide services to legal cannabis businesses, looks like it has stalled in committee and won’t come to a vote in the Senate during this session. Many credit unions that are interested in offering cannabis banking programs have been waiting for this to pass, but it’s highly unlikely to happen this year.While the SAFE Banking Act isn’t going to pass, as mentioned previously some in Congress have called for state-legal cannabis businesses to be included in economic stimulus packages. To do so would require the federal government to afford protection for those credit unions that would process loan applications and disburse funds.Why does this matter to credit unions?While it is unlikely that the SAFE Banking Act will pass this year, if state-legal marijuana businesses become eligible for stimulus funding it would presumably require that the government extend protections to financial institutions that work with MRBs.If your credit union needs expert guidance on building a cannabis banking program from the ground up, download Green Check Verified’s guide for building a business case here.last_img read more

Viral videos show Indonesian crew pleading for help aboard Chinese fishing vessel

first_imgThe sailors said they had worked on the ship for ten months and had yet to receive any payment“Our contract ends in November 2021, but we can’t wait that long. We could die here,” one of the men said.“Please help us, Pak,” they said multiple times.The video, first posted by Instagram account @infogeh, has been shared numerous times and has garnered hundreds of comments, mostly condemning the apparent abuse and similar incidents aboard other Chinese fishing vessels. The Foreign Ministry said it had received a report and was looking into the matter.Read also: Indonesia reiterates concern about alleged mistreatment of crewmen on Chinese vessels“[We] have coordinated with the Transportation Ministry and the Manpower Ministry, which issues permits for Indonesians to work as crew members on ships abroad,” Foreign Ministry director for the protection of citizens and legal entities overseas Judha Nugraha said in a statement on Wednesday.Judha said the ministry had not received any response from PT Raja Crew Atlantik (RCA), the recruiting agency mentioned in the caption of the viral video.According to data from the International Maritime Organization (IMO), Liao Yuan Yu 103, the fishing vessel mentioned in the post, is owned by Liaoning Kimliner Ocean Fishing Co. Ltd. in Dalian city, China.Judha said the ministry had coordinated with the Indonesian Embassy in Beijing to seek confirmation from the fishing vessel’s owner and Chinese authorities.“We will keep trying to call the first party that uploaded the video on social media to get more detailed information,” he said.This incident is the latest in a string of alleged abuse aboard Chinese fishing vessels. In July, an Indonesian crew member was found dead in the freezer of vessel Lu Huang Yuan Yu 117. In May, a video appeared on Facebook showing a group of sailors on Lu Qing Yuan Yu 623 throwing the body of an Indonesian sailor into the sea. Prior to that, there was public outrage at the death of four Indonesian sailors registered to another Chinese fishing ship.According to Destructive Fishing Watch (DFW) data, at least 30 Indonesian crew members were victims of exploitation aboard Chinese fishing vessels between November 2019 to June 2020, seven of whom have died and three of whom are missing. Videos apparently showing four Indonesian crew members begging to be rescued from abuse aboard a Chinese fishing vessel have gone viral on social media, the latest in a series of alleged abuses aboard such vessels. “Please get us off this ship immediately. We are being physically abused here. We were kicked, beaten, and they even threatened to stab us,” one crew member said in the video. Another said that the crew was being punched and kicked every day.“We are only given four to five hours to rest, and we work for more than 20 hours every day. If we don’t work, they will not give us any food. We are starving,” the man said. center_img Topics :last_img read more

JPMorgan Chase funds Miami Dade College program

first_imgJPMorgan Chase will award Miami Dade College (MDC) $700,000 over two years to help hundreds of South Florida’s youth gain the skills needed to land jobs in information technology, trade and logistics.Each year, the new MDC-Career Connect initiative will provide fast-track training for 100 to 150 Miami-Dade County students ages 16 to 24, earning college credit and shortening the time it takes to obtain a workforce credential.Strengthen MDC’s career pathway programsThe program aims to strengthen MDC’s career pathway programs in information technology, trade and logistics in Greater Miami – fields with high demand for middle-skill workers.Middle-skill jobs require more than a high school diploma and are central to the county’s economy. Miami’s unemployment rate for residents ages 20 to 24 with low skills is 19.9%, compared to 9.5 percent for those with some college education or an associate’s degree.Partnership with JPMorgan“We are pleased to launch this new initiative in partnership with JPMorgan Chase as we work to close the opportunity gap between the supply of trained workers and industry demand. We are also grateful to offer Miami’s youth even more opportunities to succeed,” says Mark Cole, vice president of Advancement and executive director at MDC’s Foundation.“We want more people to share in the benefits of a growing economy by creating sustainable paths to careers that lead to prosperity and wealth for more individuals,” said Guillermo Castillo, head of Chase Middle Market Banking in Miami. “Our partnership with Miami Dade College will help more youth gain the skills needed to access careers in the high demand industries of information technology, trade and logistics.”Beginning Oct. 17, Chase ATM machines across Miami will feature this initiative. To learn more and contribute, visit www.mdc.edu/givelast_img read more