November highest month for wildlife collisions; tips to reduce your risk

first_imgNovember is the worst month for wildlife collisions in the Peace Country, and the BC Conservation Foundation wants drivers to observe a few precautions to reduce their risk of hitting an animal on the road. Every year, approximately 31 animal strikes occur in the Fort St. John area during the month of November, contributing to a total of 19,600 animals killed by vehicles every year in British Columbia. Those accidents can often result in injury or worse; ICBC says provincially, more than 300 people are injured each year in these collisions, and RCMP figures indicate that on average, four people die each year in the province as a result of wildlife collisions.However, Gayle Hesse of the Wildlife Collision Prevention Program says there are easy ways to lessen the chance of hitting an animal on the road. Most importantly, drivers should reduce their speed, especially between the peak animal activity hours of 7 to 8am and 5 to 6pm. Hesse says it’s also important to resist the urge to speed through long flat stretches of road, as this is where most deer strikes occur. Additionally, drivers should be aware that deer often travel in pairs, so if one is in sight, there are likely more nearby.- Advertisement -As for the commercially available “deer whistles,” which are designed to frighten deer off the roadway by emitting a loud whistle, Hesse had this to say… [asset|aid=608|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=07b4c673922035baa40d9852a64fd86a-Hesse-Deer_1_Pub.mp3] More information on these tips can be found at www.wildlifecollisions.ca.Advertisementlast_img read more

Moody resigns as Crystal Palace director of football

first_imgIain Moody has resigned from his role as director of football at Crystal Palace with immediate effect, the club has announced.A newspaper article on Thursday morning detailed damaging text messages between Moody and former Cardiff manager Malky Mackay, and he has now tendered his resignation.The Football Association is investigating a dossier on the conduct of Moody and Mackay which was submitted to the governing body by Cardiff City.Crystal Palace will make no further comment at this stage. 1 Iain Moody (centre) with Crystal Palace chairman Steve Parish last_img read more

Giants appear ready to embrace “The Opener,” list Vincent as Tuesday starter

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — When the Giants hired Farhan Zaidi as president of baseball operations in November, it was a question of when, not if, the organization would embrace “The Opener” strategy popularized by the Tampa Bay Rays and Oakland A’s last season.Manager Bruce Bochy was initially reluctant to use a relief pitcher to start a game, but the Giants’ first-inning struggles this season have given him no choice but to experiment. The franchise appears ready to use an opener for the first time on …last_img read more

Evolution Fits Any Data

first_imgAt first blush, it might seem a wonderful thing when many different kinds of evidence can be explained by one simple, elegant theory.  Actually, though, too much confirmation can be a theory’s downfall.  When a theory explains too much – even opposite things – it really explains nothing.  For instance, everything in the universe can be explained by the phrase, “Stuff happens.”  Such a theory is useless, even if true.  That’s why any theory that explains too much should be looked at askance.  Here are some recent observations offered in support of the theory of evolution: Antibiotic resistance:  Evolutionists debating creationists have pointed to the evolution of antibiotic resistance as an example of evolution occurring right before our eyes.  The idea is that bacteria never encountered modern antibiotics till they were synthesized in the early 20th century, so they must have quickly adapted by natural selection to the new environmental challenge.  A paper in Nature just showed, however, that resistance to antibiotics is ancient.1  Canadian researchers sequenced DNA from permafrost said to be 30,000 years old, and found genes for four kinds of antiobiotic resistance already there; in fact, the gene to resist vancomycin was present, and looked similar to modern variants. The discovery of antibiotics more than 70 years ago initiated a period of drug innovation and implementation in human and animal health and agriculture. These discoveries were tempered in all cases by the emergence of resistant microbes. This history has been interpreted to mean that antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a modern phenomenon; this view is reinforced by the fact that collections of microbes that predate the antibiotic era are highly susceptible to antibiotics…. This work firmly establishes that antibiotic resistance genes predate our use of antibiotics and offers the first direct evidence that antibiotic resistance is an ancient, naturally occurring phenomenon widespread in the environment. This is consistent with the rapid emergence of resistance in the clinic and predicts that new antibiotics will select for pre-existing resistance determinants that have been circulating within the microbial pangenome for millennia. Rather than falsifying a key argument for evolution, though, this has been taken as further confirmation of it.  “These results show conclusively that antibiotic resistance is a natural phenomenon,” the authors said, “that predates the modern selective pressure of clinical antibiotic use.”  It just puts the “selective pressure” in the past instead of under our eyes. Endless variation most beautiful:  The lab plant Arabidopsis thaliana (water cress) has been scrutinized every which way.  Now there are genomes for dozens of varieties.  Michael Bevan wrote for Nature about what geneticists are learning from comparative genomics.2  He began, Charles Darwin wrote of the “endless forms most beautiful” of species that have arisen from natural selection. But his words also apply to the genetic variation within species such as the highly adaptable plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Fig. 1). The first analyses of the sequences of multiple genomes of A. thaliana, including one on page 419 of this issue by Gan et al., have now been published. These studies provide a foundation for identifying the factors that shape genome change, and for mapping genome-sequence variation among a wide range of A. thaliana varieties that represents the plant’s diversity. But while Bevan and Gan et al.3 welcomed the new information on genetic diversity of this plant, they did not entertain thoughts that the variability could have been designed (i.e., for pre-programmed adaptability), nor did they consider the question of why, after presumably millions of years of variation, these plants are still members of a single species.  How appropriate, therefore, was it for Bevan to apply Darwin’s line to the phenomenon? Time dilation:  Researchers proudly announced a new robust Tree of Life for mammals.  The report in PhysOrg shows Mark Springer (UC Riverside) smiling happily beside his computer screen.  With teammates from Texas A&M, Springer got the fossils and the genetics to match in what had been a problematic phylogeny.  “This is the first time this kind of dataset has been put together for mammals,” Springer boasted.  In the body of the article, however, was this curious admission: To date divergence times on their phylogeny of mammalian families, Springer and colleagues used a “relaxed molecular clock.” This kind of molecular clock allows for the use of multiple rates of evolution instead of using one rate of evolution that governs all branches of the Tree of Life. They also used age estimates for numerous fossil mammals to calibrate their time tree. But if the calibration is applied to a relaxed clock, it would seem that this is an exercise in circular reasoning: using evolutionarily-assumed estimates for fossil dates to stretch or compress the dates for evolutionarily-assumed ancestral lines.  Visions of Salvador Dali’s The Persistence of Memory come to mind. Fluctuating climate:  As the old joke goes, if you don’t like the weather in [name your city], wait five minutes.”  This can be expanded in evolutionary time to, “If you can’t evolve in your local climate, wait a million years.”  Sure enough, PhysOrg announced to readers, “Climatic fluctuations drove key events in human evolution.”  To support this idea, a notion was introduced called variability selection.  “Variability selection suggests that evolution, when faced with rapid climatic fluctuation, should respond to the range of habitats encountered rather than to each individual habitat in turn; the timeline of variability selection established by Dr. [Matt] Grove [U of Liverpool] suggests that Homo erectus could be a product of exactly this process.”  That’s because, he explains, Homo erectus was a “generalist,” something like a jack of all climates.  Other putative ancestors apparently took the latter option of the slogan, “evolve or perish.”  While suggesting things, Grove also suggested that recent global warming may outrun humans’ ability to evolve.  That shouldn’t be a problem, though; maybe “relaxed molecular clocks” (see previous item) could be applied to match evolution up with “variability selection.” Forward, backward, or lateral pass:  Another article on PhysOrg exclaims, “Fluid equilibrium in prehistoric organisms sheds light on a turning point in evolution.”  Since “Maintaining fluid balance in the body is essential to survival, from the tiniest protozoa to the mightiest of mammals,” evolution was faced with a crossroads.  In the new tale, “Swiss researchers have found genetic evidence that links this intricate process to a turning point in evolution.”  Old cells couldn’t pump sodium out of their membranes effectively.  This put them behind an evolutionary roadblock.  Bernard Rossier (U of Lausanne) figured out how they broke through: a certain subunit of a gene for pumping sodium “appeared” and the rest was history: “the team found that the beta subunit appeared slightly before the emergence of Metazoans (multicellular animals with differentiated tissues) roughly 750 million years ago.”  Rossier couldn’t quite figure out when the emergence appeared: Dr. Rossier said that although it is possible that the genes for ENaC originated in the common ancestor of eukaryotes and were lost in all branches except the Metazoa and the Excavates, there is another possibility. There could have been a lateral transfer of genes between N. gruberi and a Metazoan ancestor, one that lived between the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes and the first Metazoans. Either way, evolution explains it, and evolution wins.  With this vital piece of their machinery now in place, the first eukaryotic cells that emerged could pump their sodium, maintain fluid balance, and diversify.  Giraffes and redwoods could not be far behind; after all, what’s a few more million years?  That’s plenty of evolutionary time for things to emerge and appear. Under the sea:  According to PhysOrg, evolutionary detectives are getting warmer. Their goal is to explain a profound mystery: About 3.8 billion years ago, Earth was teeming with unicellular life. A little more than 4.5 billion years ago, the Earth was a ball of vaporous rock. And somewhere in between, the first organisms spontaneously arose.  Pinpointing exactly when and how that shift happened has proven a difficult bit of interdisciplinary detective work. A team of Stanford geologists hasn’t quite solved the problem, but they’ve come closer. By examining the geology and environment of the early Earth, the researchers demonstrate the plausibility of one theory: that life originated above serpentinite rock on the ocean bottom. Because the necessary conditions only existed for a few million years, the findings provide a potential timestamp for the appearance of the Earth’s first organism. Whether or not this represents scientific progress, though, is an interesting question.  Their scenario relies heavily on imagination: “Serpentinite was likely present when life arose,” the body text states further down.  “Unfortunately, the geological record only reliably goes back approximately 3.8 billion years, making a definitive statement impossible.”  (This calls into question the above claim that the scientists examined the geology and environment of the early Earth.) Their scenario relies on acid gradients providing an energy source for any organisms waiting in the wings to appear on stage.  “This leaves a relatively brief window for the origin of life, at least by this mechanism,” one researcher said.  The article ended, “Smoking-gun evidence in support of the origin-of-life theory remains hard to come by.”  To top it off, a researcher gave his opinion of this scientific theory founded on imagination: “It’s conceivable that a biologist might get lucky, but I’m not holding my breath.” In spite of this questionable display of confirmation for evolution (which can be considered representative, looking back through years of similar examples in Creation-Evolution Headlines), wrath remains at a fever pitch against alternatives to Darwinian evolution.  An interesting article in PhysOrg claimed that many scientists do not have a problem mixing science and religion – provided the religion completely disallows even an unspecified “designer” any active role in the process of evolution.  “Nearly all of the scientists – religious and nonreligious alike – have a negative impression of the theory of intelligent design,” the article stated about results of a poll among scientists.  The venom against anyone disbelieving evolution was sizzling in an article on Techie Buzz reviewing a new Canadian book for children about evolution, entitled “Evolution: How We and All Living Things Came to Be,” by Daniel Loxton.  In the review, Debjyoti Bardhan started by ranting against the religious right in America, described as “a powerful Christian creationist lobby sitting in the various corridors of power… well-funded, politically powerful and extremely motivated, ready at a moment’s notice to take steps against anything deemed remotely anti-Christian.”  Standing in stark contrast are the truth-seekers, scientists who study evolution: “evolutionary theory has continued to grow, just as scientific truth does.”  Bardhan and Loxton repeated several boilerplate memes: that evolutionary theory is as well established as Newton’s theory of gravity, that evolution is science and anything else is religion, that “intelligent design” (always with scare quotes) is a rechristened avatar of Creationism, etc.  Ironically, Loxton’s book uses the evolution of drug-resistant bacteria as evidence. “Not one piece of evidence has disproved evolutionary theory,” Bardhan asserted.4  Indeed; how could it?  Evolution explains everything.  Whether a theory that explains everything is a good scientific theory is a completely different question. 1.  D’Costa, King et al., “Antibiotic resistance is ancient,” Nature 477  (22 September 2011), pp. 457–461, doi:10.1038/nature10388. 2.  Michael Bevan, “Genomics: Endless variation most beautiful,” Nature 477 (22 September 2011), pp. 415–416, doi:10.1038/477415a. 3. Gan, Stegle et al., “Multiple reference genomes and transcriptomes for Arabidopsis thaliana,” Nature 477 (22 September 2011), pp. 419–423, doi:10.1038/nature10414. 4. Bardhan suggested a falsification test for evolution: “Not one piece of evidence has disproved evolutionary theory, despite there being extremely easy ways to do so (‘Just find a fossil rabbit in the Precambrian’, as J.B.S Haldane put it).”  It is true that no Precambrian rabbits have turned up yet; however, other fossil discoveries nearly as unexpected have, and yet evolutionists found ways to incorporate the damaging evidence (for examples, search for “Precambrian rabbit” in our search bar).  It is doubtful, therefore, that a real Precambrian rabbit would actually disprove evolutionary theory. There is only one explanation for these observations: (1) evolutionism cannot be falsified, (2) evolutionary theory assumes what it needs to prove, (3) evolutionists continue to maintain such passion about their theory, and (4) evolutionary theory relies on miracles: things originate, appear, emerge, develop, and arise.  The explanation: evolution is a religion masquerading as science. On that topic, learn about Darwin’s religious views in this new article by Richard Weikart on American Thinker.  Coupled with Richard Dawkins’ oft-quoted statement that Darwinism allows one to become an intellectually-fulfilled atheist, it’s no wonder that Darwin’s disciples are so militant in their faith and energetic about keeping the real motivations hidden behind a facade of false-front scientific evidence to support their religion.(Visited 52 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

R1bn housing incentive fund

first_img12 February 2010 The government plans to set up a R1-billion guarantee fund to encourage South Africa’s banks and construction companies to develop new products to meet the country’s housing demand. Delivering his State of the Nation address in Parliament, Cape Town on Thursday, President Jacob Zuma said a key new initiative would be to accommodate people whose salaries were too high to get government subsidies, but who earned too little to qualify for normal banks mortgage. This would form part of the government’s work towards upgrading informal settlements in South Africa and providing proper service and land tenure to half-a-million households by 2014. The government is to set aside over 6 000 hectares of “well-located” public land for low-income and affordable housing, Zuma added.Rural development The government was also busy rolling out various pilot projects under the Comprehensive Rural Development Programme. Since the launch of the first pilot project in Giyani, Limpopo province in 2009, 231 houses had been built, while access to health and education had improved, and infrastructure had been provided to support agricultural development and training to the community. Similar programmes were being rolled out in seven other sites across the country, Zuma said. By 2014, the government aimed to have sites in 160 wards. The aim was for 60% of households at these sites to be able to meet their requirements through production of their own food. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Security And Software Asset Management: Knowledge Is Power

first_img3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Related Posts Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Tags:#networking#security center_img kris barker Guest author Kris Barker is co-founder and CEO of Express Metrix Asset Management Software.Even the smallest network is under threat from botnets, hacking, Trojans, denial of service (DoS) attacks and information leakage. Malicious or criminal attacks, the most expensive cause of data breaches, are on the rise and the consequences of poor network protection are harsh.A Ponemon Institute and Symantec study published in March 2012 shows a jump in data breaches caused by malicious attacks from 31% in 2010 to 37% in 2011, with an average cost of $222 per incident. Negligence accounted for a further 39% of reported breaches. The majority of serious breaches result from failings in people, process and technology.The majority of threats originate from within an organization. The U.S. Computer Emergency Response Team (Cert) estimates that insiders – whether malicious or merely careless – are responsible for almost 40% of IT security breaches. Security technology such as firewalls, content security appliances or desktop programs can’t entirely compensate for people’s ability to deliberately or innocently bypass the rules.Meanwhile, changes in workplace habits like mobile working and the use of multiple devices have upped the security ante. Outside the office, employees connect to corporate systems and programs via VPN tunnels or Web-based remote access applications, using corporate, personal or even public computers and devices. With so many access methods, the network perimeter remains porous, leading IT security managers on a constant search for additional protection and monitoring capabilities.The situation is exacerbated by the rise in employees’ use of their own devices for work, whether authorized or as an under-the-radar aid to productivity. Despite increasing acceptance of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) practices, there’s a growing gap between what employees actually do and what organizations have accommodated into their security and corporate best practices. Research by Information Law LLC from March 2012 indicates that 31% of companies surveyed had no company policy governing employees’ use of their own devices at work, while a further 26% said they ‘sort of’ did.The Case for Deeper Software InsightIn addition to securing the network perimeter, corporate desktops and mobile devices, IT departments need to quickly and easily monitor the software that users are installing and accessing, and ensure that only authorized individuals are using programs with access to sensitive information.To this end, software asset management (SAM) tools add a valuable weapon to the IT security arsenal. SAM helps tackle potential risks from the software usage perspective, helping IT managers detect and halt threats in four major areas:Identifying malicious programs, hacking tools and other unauthorized softwarePreventing the use of suspect or malicious applicationsIn the event of a security breach, examining application usage data to see who was running suspect applicationsIdentifying and reducing the number of underused software titles so IT can support and patch fewer applicationsAcceptable Application MatrixIt is much easier to maintain a robust security posture if acceptable software titles and types are defined and documented from the outset. Maintaining a matrix of tested, validated, approved and documented software helps strengthen policies and support existing technology. Establishing a matrix helps IT set policies preventing workers from using unauthorized software.Application ControlDespite the most stringent software usage policies, portable storage and mobile communications devices can insert unwelcome software behind the organization’s firewall at any moment. But disabling unacceptable programs can be a powerful weapon against potential security breaches. Application control also helps ensure that only authorized users can gain access to specific programs.Access InsightWhile most applications through which sensitive data can be accessed are protected by authentication controls, SAM solutions add a further layer of security by providing an instant snapshot – at any time – of which employees are accessing which program. The ability to retroactively trace the origins of a breach is an important reporting tool – especially for companies subject to regulatory compliance.Improved Patch ManagementBetter SAM tools give IT a streamlined way to identify and eliminate underused or redundant software titles, and to restrict access on a needs-only basis. IT departments no longer have to act as detectives, and they can save time by supporting and patching fewer applications. They can also help ensure that all devices on the network are running the appropriate security software, a huge time saver.Knowledge is power – and security. Your level of protection is significantly higher when you know exactly what software your organization authorizes, see who is accessing which programs, prevent the use of unacceptable programs and identify any breaches. IT + Project Management: A Love Affairlast_img read more

How to Create Great Production Design for Film & Video

first_imgProduction design is the key to creating the world in which a film exists. Let’s take a look at what it takes to develop solid production design.Top Image: JJ Abrams and Daisy Ridley on the set of Star Wars: The Force Awakens via Lucasfilm.Production design is a huge component of the filmmaking or video production process. There’s a lot that you can convey to your audience through great production design. With this in mind, we’re going to rely on the experience and knowledge of Colin Gibson (Mad Max: Fury Road), Grant Major (Lord of the Rings: Return of the King), Rick Carter (Star Wars: The Force Awakens), and the legendary Stuart Craig (Harry Potter Series).Through each one of these Academy Award-winning Production Designers, we’ll learn what we need to do to take our productions to the next level.What Is Production Design?Production design is the process of developing and creating the “look” of a film or video environment. This includes creating the initial concepts, building sets, fabricating costumes, developing makeup effects, and working with the VFX team. In the end, all of these sections come together to present the audience with visual information that establishes a sense of place and conveys an emotional response through the background elements, costumes, and props.Who Runs the Design Team?At the head of production design is the production designer or PD. The PD will work closely with the director and cinematographer to set the overall look of the film and to bring the director’s vision to life. They also oversee all aspects of the production design from concept to construction. However, they do not do this alone; there are several key crew members that work alongside the PD.Production Design Team:Art Director (AD): works directly with the PD and oversees the draftsmen, storyboards, artists, and set decorators.Production Illustrator or Concept Artist: creates the initial sketches and designs alongside the PD and AD.VFX Coordinator or Supervisor: works with the PD to ensure CGI elements match the look of the practical set.Set Decorator: develops the look of the set through research and obtains items to fill the set.Set Dresser: arranges the items from the set decorator and ensures continuity between scenes.Costume Designer: works with the AD to develop the look of the characters, pays close attention to period and place.Makeup Artist: oversees all makeup aspects of the production, from simple adjustments to special effects makeup.Why Is Production Design so Important?As mentioned above, this is the process of building the physical look of the film. The set, costuming, and makeup design all need to be reflections of one another. If one of these aspects is off, then you run the risk of pulling your audience out of the experience.One worrisome issue that production designers face in today’s industry is they must fight to retain control over the look of the film due to the reliance on CGI visual effects, as Grant Major mentioned in 2014.You often have to fight for control of the look of the film when you have the production sub-contract out to digital companies these virtual environments. — Grant MajorIn an interview with Deadline, production designer Colin Gibson stated that PDs need to push for practical sets and effects. He mentions that audiences today are far more impressed when a set is practical and crafted by an amazing production design team, which was the approach he took when designing Mad Max: Fury Road.You still need to get the hair up on the back of people’s necks. You still need real physics. — Colin GibsonOf course, there’s no stopping the advance of digital filmmaking. While some production designers see this as a possible issue, PD Rick Carter sees it as a natural progression toward a new era of hybrid filmmaking. These are the principles he employed when designing practical and digital elements for Star Wars: The Force Awakens.There’s something that’s going on with the computer and with hybrid moviemaking… Just a lot that’s physical and a lot that’s digital, and it’s all part of the new vernacular. — Rick CarterSo, as you can see from the words of these Oscar-winning designers, production design is absolutely crucial to a film or video’s success. Let’s look at the collaborative process of designing a film or video.Production Design: the Three-Part Process1. ConceptEach production design begins with the production designer reading the script to determine the initial visual style. Once this is done, meetings with the director and cinematographer take place to solidify the design. To make this happen, concept illustrations and mock-ups are researched, produced, and sent to the director and producer for approvals. These concepts and mock-up designs cover set architecture, costumes, props, VFX design, and makeup.Here’s a video from The Gnomon Workshop that features the legendary concept designer Syd Mead (Blade Runner, Tron, Aliens). In the video, Mead offers crucial design advice and demonstrates some of his storied talent and technique.2. PlanningOnce the designs are approved, the PD’s team moves into the planning stage. Additional research on build locations for the sets takes place. Blueprints for set construction are drafted. Also, budgets and property lists are developed to ensure that this portion of production doesn’t run beyond the funding allowed.3. FabricationOnce designs are approved and plans are finalized, the actual fabrication of the design begins. Construction crews come in and actually build the set if needed. Also, the set decorator, dresser, costume designer, and makeup artist begin the process of developing their individual parts of the production design. When this portion is done, the director, cast, and crew begin film production.Have you had experience with production design? Share your story in the comments below!last_img read more

Why I Wrote The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need

first_imgMy book, The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need, will be published on October 11th, 2016.The first publisher that reached out to me asking me to write a book didn’t want the book I wanted to write. They didn’t understand why I started the book with a chapter on self-discipline. In their view, the book only got worse. They wanted to know what things like optimism, caring, initiative, and resourcefulness were doing in a book on sales. I wanted to know how they couldn’t understand why these attributes were important, so I asked them if they ever sold or managed a sales team. Unfortunately, they hadn’t.To be fair, they expected a book written by a consultant to help win new consulting clients. They thought the audience should be different, and therefore the book made no sense to them.A second publisher that reached out to me pitched me on writing a book. They didn’t really care what the book was about. They cared mostly about how many books I thought I could sell, and how willing I was to commit to buying thousands of books from them myself.I argued that they really didn’t pitch me with a good value proposition. They said that their imprint was impressive, that it would give me credibility. I couldn’t think of a single book I ever bought that I bought because of the imprint, and I buy a lot of books.Going It AloneI wanted to write the book I wanted to write. With a couple of unimpressive conversations under my belt, I decided to publish the book myself.I wrote the book. Next, I hired a professional editor to edit the book with me. Editing is a painful process. In the first chapter, I used the words “dream clients” four times. His note said, “Am I supposed to know what this means? If I don’t know, how will the reader know?” I told him the people who read my blog would know what I mean when I say “dream clients.” He made me define it the first time it appears in the book.This went on for 18 more chapters, and the book was greatly improved. When we finished, we started over.I loaded the manuscript up on Createspace, and I began working through the process of self-publishing. Now I had total control.With a Little Help From My FriendsSix weeks before publishing, I received a direct message on Twitter from an editor at Portfolio asking me why I hadn’t written a book. I explained that I had spoken with a couple of publishers, but I didn’t find the value proposition compelling, so I decided to go it alone. He asked if he might share a few ideas about how I might improve my results, and I agreed to connect.We scheduled a call. He hated the title. He hated the subtitle. He wasn’t exactly sure that my book fulfilled its title’s promise with what was inside the covers. He told me if the book did well, he’d give me a deal on the next book. I told him I valued his advice, and that he should read the book and tell me everything I got wrong, and I would do my best to improve upon it.Six days later he sent me a two-book deal. He said that he didn’t expect to like the book nearly as much as he did. Portfolio has been an exceptional partner, and because they publish sales books, they totally understood the book and why I wrote it.Between the CoversThe book is made up of two halves. The first half of the book is made up of nine elements that, when mastered, will help you become someone worth buying from. The second half is made up of the eight skills you need to succeed in sales now.I wrote this book for salespeople. I wanted to write a book that would help salespeople improve their results. If you want to do the work to produce better results, this book will be your guide. You can do the work alone, if necessary. You can also get a free workbook to help you.If you are sales manager, this book will give you a new lens through which to view the individuals that make up your team. You will be able to quickly identify the areas where the individuals on your team need improvement, and how you can help them. There are also videos and tele-seminars available that you can use for team meetings when you pre-order.If you are a leader, you are going to want this book for your managers and their people. You are also going to want to use it as a hiring guide and an on-boarding guide for sales operations and training.If you are interested in preordering the book, there are amazing bonus offers for you here: preorder.theonlysalesguide.com.last_img read more