Senate approves COR merger resolution

first_imgAfter much debate, Student Senate passed a resolution combining Senate with the Council of Representatives (COR) at its meeting Wednesday. In his State of the Union address prior to the vote, student body president Pat McCormick said the resolution further enables the Student Union to act upon the will of the student body. “The time has come for us to think of ourselves no longer as independent organizations, but as a united student union,” he said. “All the rest of our goals for this year are dependent on this goal.” The resolution dissolves COR and adds six new voting members to Senate — the four class presidents, the Club Coordination Council president and the off-campus president. Originally, the resolution proposed adding the Student Union Board (SUB) manager and Student Union treasurer as voting members as well. However, many senators pointed out that these positions are not voted upon by the student body, as the rest of the positions in Senate are. “I’m against non-elected representatives having voting rights,” Fisher senator Colin Geils said. “I don’t feel they properly represent the student body.” SUB manager Joe Caparros said that while policy changes made in Senate have not affected SUB a great deal in recent years, it is possible they could in the future. “I do represent the interests of the Student Union Board but I also represent the interests of everyone,” he said. “The risk is that if policy does affect SUB more than it has in the past there is a danger for SUB to not have a say in any of that.” Student Union treasurer Eric Biro expressed concern that non-voting members of Senate did not have the “right of agenda,” the ability to bring resolutions before Senate. “I think there’s something to be said for the person who knows the most about the Student Union fiscal policy to lose that right of agenda,” he said. The senators voted to amend the resolution, changing the SUB manager and Student Union treasurer to non-voting members while also granting these members the right of agenda. The most hotly contested issue was the question of whether to add one of the co-chairs of Hall President’s Council (HPC) as a voting member. Pasquerilla East senator Katie Rose said members of her dorm had raised concern over an HPC co-chair being able to vote in Senate. “They already have a lot of power,” she said. “If we’re trying to increase representation of the Student Union, well the residence halls are already represented by us.” HPC co-chair Jay Mathes said he and fellow co-chair Billy Wardlaw would be able to provide the perspective of the halls as an aggregate force, rather than a particular one as the senators do. “We’re not divided by dorm, grade or gender and we’re one of the very few groups here on campus that are looking out for the benefits of all students,” he said. “The perspectives we have and the talks we have with presidents on a day-to-day basis add different conclusions. It’s a perspective we really need to take care of.” McCormick said an HPC co-chair would also offer the benefit of a representative with greater experience in student government. In the past, senators were always seniors. Now, almost all senators are sophomores or juniors, McCormick said. “It creates a body that tends to be younger and has this as their initial or second point of entry into student government,” he said. “You might have this conclusion that the HPC co-chair might exert undue influence on the other senators, but on the other hand, that might not be a bad thing either.” The co-chair would contribute a more seasoned opinion from the hall perspective than a sophomore senator would be able to, McCormick said. Despite these arguments, senators voted to amend the resolution to add an HPC co-chair as a non-voting member of Senate. The resolution also reallocates the previous responsibilities of COR. Oversight Committee chair Ben Noe said the COR Collaboration Fund, which allocates funds to organizations that are working together on an event, will now be managed by the Financial Management Board (FMB). “We felt this fund would best be moved to FMB and chaired by the Student Union treasurer with representatives from every organization,” he said. “Now the fund will be managed by an actual financial body rather than representatives.” A special committee of former COR members will now be chosen to approve the Student Union budget, also previously managed by COR. Further, the resolution changes the names of several groups in order to better reflect their functions: the Executive Policy Board to the Executive Cabinet, committees and committee chairs to departments and directors and Oversight to Internal Affairs. The resolution was the result of months of effort by Noe, his committee and the subcommittee on constitutional reform. “I really think this resolution will help us build a student government that is truly indicative of a student union in that the leaders of all the organizations will come together in one meeting,” Noe said. “And they will all have some say and some vote on what is being said and done in terms of policy.”last_img read more

Dissidents in Myanmar appear to lose hope

first_imgYANGON, Myanmar – Die-hard protesters waved the peacock flag of the crushed pro-democracy movement on a solitary march Saturday through the eerily quiet streets of Myanmar’s largest city, where many dissidents said they were resigned to defeat without international intervention. Housewives and shop owners taunted troops but quickly disappeared into alleyways. According to diplomats briefed by witnesses, residents of three neighborhoods blocked soldiers from entering the monasteries in a crackdown on Buddhist monks, who led the largest in a month of demonstrations. The soldiers left threatening to return with reinforcements. The top U.N. envoy on Myanmar, Ibrahim Gambari, arrived in the country but many protesters said they were seeing a repeat of the global reaction to a 1988 pro-democracy uprising, when the world stood by as protesters were gunned down in the streets. “Gambari is coming, but I don’t think it will make much of a difference,” said one hotel worker, who like other residents asked not to be named, fearing retaliation. “We have to find a solution ourselves.” Soldiers and police were posted on almost all corners in the cities of Yangon and Mandalay. Shopping malls, grocery stores and public parks were closed and few people dared to venture out of their homes. A young woman who took part in a massive demonstration in Yangon on Thursday said she didn’t think “we have any more hope to win.” She was separated from her boyfriend when police broke up the protest by firing into crowds and has not seen him since. “The monks are the ones who give us courage,” she said. Most of the clerics are now besieged in their monasteries behind locked gates and barbed wire. Gambari was taken immediately to Naypyitaw, the remote, bunker-like capital where the country’s military leaders are based. The White House urged the junta to allow him to have access to Aung San Suu Kyi – the Nobel Peace Prize laureate who is under house arrest – and ordinary Myanmar residents. The demonstrations began last month as people angry over massive fuel price hikes took to the streets – then mushroomed into the tens of thousands after the monks began marching. The junta, which has a long history of snuffing out dissent, started cracking down Wednesday, when the first of at least 10 deaths was reported, and then let loose on Thursday, shooting into a crowd of protesters and clubbing them with batons. The crackdown triggered an unprecedented verbal flaying of Myanmar’s generals from almost every corner of the world – even some criticism from No. 1 ally China. But little else that might stay the junta’s heavy hand is seen in the foreseeable future. The United States, which exercises meager leverage, froze any assets that 14 Myanmar leaders may have in U.S. financial institutions and prohibited American citizens from doing business with them. The leaders, including Than Shwe, are believed to have few if any such connections. The United Nations has compiled a lengthy record of failure in trying to broker reconciliation between the junta and Suu Kyi. Gambari has been snubbed and sometimes barred from entry by the ruling State Peace and Development Council, as the ruling junta is formally known. The United States, Japan and others have turned a hopeful eye on China – Myanmar’s biggest trading partner – as the most likely outside catalyst for change. But China, India and Russia do not seem prepared to go beyond words in their dealings with the junta, ruling out sanctions as they jostle for a chance to get at Myanmar’s bountiful and largely untapped natural resources, especially its oil and gas.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Salaam Cricket 2018: This bowler troubled the mighty Sunil Gavaskar the most

first_imgSunil Gavaskar, the first man to breach the 10,000-run mark in Test cricket tamed the feared West Indies pace attack, played fearlessly against some of the most ferocious fast bowlers of all time, gave nightmares to Imran Khan and played some of the greatest knocks in recorded history.Despite all his heroics against the best of the best, guess which bowler troubled the mighty Sunil Gavaskar the most?Bruce Yardley of Australia. He was by no means a bad bowler. In 33 Tests, he picked 126 wickets at an average of 31.63. But for someone who had conquered some of the most fearsome pacers and wily spinners of all time, struggling against Yardley must have been a little weird.Salaam Cricket 2018: Sunil Gavaskar reveals why he once sported a moustache”Bruce Yardley of Australia,” Gavaskar replied when asked which bowler troubled him the most at Salaam Cricket 2018. “I wasn’t able to pick him up when he delivered the ball and he had a long run-up for an off-spinner. I was uncomfortable playing him.Salaam Cricket 2018: Gavaskar, Akram, Harbhajan leave audience in splits”I went to Chetan Chauhan during a match and told him I can take Len Pascoe and you take Yardley. He was like I was going to say the same but you would have misunderstood,” Gavaskar told the audience.For the record, Len Pascoe was an aggressive fast bowler who picked 64 wickets from 14 Tests.Did you ask your mother before coming here? Akram once mocked a young TendulkarDuring the course of an interesting conversation which also featured Akram, Younis Khan, Misbah-ul-haq, Abdul Qadir, Harbhajan Singh, Mohammad Azharuddin, R Ashwin, Habibul Bashar, Muttiah Muralitharan and Madan Lal on stage, Gavaskar said the name Sunny bhai was given to him by Azhar and it stuck ever since.advertisementSalaam Cricket 2018: HIGHLIGHTSAnd what about Gavaskar’s most cherished moments?”India winning the 1983 World Cup, it was the supreme moment for me. The appeal was made for Michael Holding but my aim was to save the one run and then I heard from the audience that he was given out and I kept the ball in my pocket and believe me, Usain Bolt could not catch me.. the way I ran to the pavilion. I then went to the West Indies dressing room to get autographs,” he said.last_img read more