Listen To Twiddle’s Smoldering Late Night Set At Susquehanna Breakdown

first_imgWhen you bring Twiddle to a festival that features bluegrass music predominantly, it’s only logical to let the jammers go to work in the wee hours of the night. The group is known for their exploratory improvisation, and the electric-fueled jams are best set to those wired for the after hours experience. After a full day on the main stage that featured Cabinet, The Infamous Stringdusters, Railroad Earth and more, it was up to Twiddle to bring it to a close. They delivered an impeccable two hour set, ripe with their improvisational prowess.With a schedule labelled “12:30 – ??,” anticipation from the band’s loyal fans was running high. Twiddle got to work on their song “Wildfire” before winding into tunes like “Daydream Farmer” and “Apples.” Of the eight songs the band performed, six of them cracked the 10-minute jam milestone, and four stretched to the 18-minute depths of perfection. The time markers are merely indicators of the band’s free-flowing supremacy, as Twiddle continues their pace as fastest growing jam groups in the scene today.Thankfully, taper Keith Litzenberger captured this glorious performance for all to hear. Tune in below.Stay tuned to L4LM for more coverage from Susquehanna Breakdown, and check out the full setlist below via uTwiddle.net.Setlist: Twiddle at Susquehanna Breakdown @ Montage Mountain, Scranton, PA – 5/21/16One Set: Wildfire, Daydream Farmer, Apples, Doinkinbonk!!!, Indigo Trigger > The Box, Frankenfoote, The CatapillarShow Notes: This show was the “Festively Plump” 2016 summer tour opener. The set closed out the second day of the festival. The set was played on the Susquehanna Stage.[Photo by Dave DeCrescente]last_img read more

Professor reflects on personal faith journey

first_imgProfessor Daniel Lapsley, professor and chair of the department of psychology, reflected on his faith journey for the second event in the Fr. Ted Talk series held in honor of University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh.In the talk in Reckers on Thursday night, Lapsley said the journey of faith forces people to confront two fundamental questions.“The journey of faith, as I understand it, is an attempt to answer two really important questions. The first is: Who am I? This is the great identity question. This is the question that becomes especially compelling to adolescents and adults,” he said. “The second question was actually asked by Jesus: Who is the son of man?”Lapsley said these questions can’t be fully answered until one’s journey of faith is fully developed into a narrative.“I want to elevate the category of narrative and story to equal footing with the metaphor of journey,” he said. “Coming to grips with faith is not just a journey, it’s being able to tell a narrative. It’s being able to tell a story. It’s an attempt to find interweaving of the two great questions I posed. … Our journey does not make sense until we develop it into a narrative that makes sense.”A person’s narrative is constantly evolving and tries to make sense of the past, present and future, Lapsley said.“You’re trying to make sense of what your life has been prior to coming to Notre Dame, trying to wrestle with what life is like now and what you promise to be in the future,” he said. “In the decades ahead of you, you’re going to try to keep the narrative going. The story you’ve constructed for yourself from childhood through adolescence is not going to be the same story when you’re 30, and 40, and 50 and beyond.”Lapsley said his narrative changed drastically when he reached middle school and faltered in his religious beliefs.“I was a religious boy, very pious. I took ritual and pietism seriously,” he said. “But [in middle school] I’m sort of trying to figure out who I am. I’m trying to answer the identity question. … I was pushing back against borrowed ideas. I’m trying to carve out a sense of self, I’m trying to write my own narrative.”This sudden decrease in faith, Lapsley said, is very common among adolescents.“From early adolescence to late adolescence, ritual observance, religiosity among adolescents, declines into the university years — religiosity declines, but spirituality increases,” he said. “Answering the question who am I and who do you say I am are going to be interwoven … but sometimes this bumps up against developmental challenges, which kind of breaks the story apart, as you try to write a better narrative.”Part of his journey of faith was reconciling the different storylines of his narrative, Lapsley said.“As I struggle to keep the narrative going, a couple of other storylines come into my story,” he said. “One storyline is that as a scientist — I’m committed to naturalism in ethics and in science. So that means that transcendental or metaphysical or supernatural things kind of bump in. It’s hard to make that fit into a narrative. … I take solace in the fact that empiricism has it’s home in Catholicism.”Lapsley said being a member of the Notre Dame community helped him to reconnect with his faith.“I felt like it was the hand of God. I felt like this was not an accident, that somehow it was providential that I was here,” he said. “I began to reflect on this. I began to go to daily mass at the Basilica, I began to get in touch with my faith life again. … I just felt a deeper connection to the faith community here.”Tags: Faith, faith narrative, Fr. Ted Talks, journeylast_img read more

Ball to continue Sunderland role

first_imgKevin Ball will send Sunderland into battle with Manchester United on Saturday after having his spell as interim head coach extended. Press Association The 48-year-old, who was initially asked to take up the reins for the Capital One Cup win over Peterborough and Sunday’s 3-1 Barclays Premier League defeat by Liverpool, will continue in the role as the Black Cats run the rule over a series of potential replacements for Paolo Di Canio. Sunderland confirmed the move on their official website on Monday afternoon, eight days on from the Italian’s departure. However, chief executive Margaret Byrne has revealed that discussions with several contenders have already taken place and talks with others will be held this week, and it appears an appointment is not imminent. But should the club eventually opt to give the job to former Black Cats midfielder Ball, the decision would go down well with the players. O’Shea said: “Without a doubt, he’s made an impact. If it does happen, the players would be very happy. “But we will wait and see what the club decides.” Ball launched his spell in charge with a 2-0 Capital One Cup victory over Posh on Tuesday evening, but was unable to repeat the feat against sterner opposition on Sunday. Sunderland played a full part in the game, but were ultimately undone by the brilliance of the returning Luis Suarez and strike-partner Daniel Sturridge. The latter gave Liverpool a 28th-minute lead when he bundled Steven Gerrard’s corner home with his arm, and then set up the Uruguay international to score his first goal for the club since April with a perfectly weighted cross eight minutes before the break. However, the Black Cats’ response was hugely creditable and they got themselves back into the game within seven minutes of the restart when Emanuele Giaccherini struck from close range after keeper Simon Mignolet could only parry Ki Sung-yueng’s shot from distance. But the Reds held firm in the face of a concerted assault and secured their win with a minute remaining when Suarez and Sturridge combined superbly before the South American claimed his second of the game. Ball was disappointed by the result, but hugely encouraged by the performance of his players in front of the watching owner Ellis Short. He said: “That’s something that whenever you come away from the Stadium of Light, no matter who is in charge, whatever the club, we have always got to see that. “That’s something that I would drum into the players in future, we must see that all the time. “People must go away from here, irrespective of what happens, and away from home as well knowing full well that their team has put in a shift, and today, they can say that.” Confirmation, which was not unexpected, came as skipper John O’Shea ordered his team-mates to draw a line under the catastrophic breakdown of their relationship with Di Canio and dig themselves out of trouble. The Black Cats remain rooted to the foot of the Barclays Premier League table after taking just a single point from their first six games and O’Shea, while confirming that the dressing room had played a part in the 45-year-old’s demise, has insisted the players must regroup to prevent the club from being cast adrift. He told the Sunderland Echo: “That was obviously done. But we have to move on now. “Because of the position we are in in the league, we can’t keep going back to it. We have got some difficult months ahead. “Whoever comes in, whether it’s Bally or a new manager, we have got tough times ahead. “We have to stick together and if we keep going back to it, it will soon be too hard to pull back from where we are.” Sunderland turned in a much-improved display against Liverpool but ultimately came out of it empty-handed once again, and with United due to arrive on Wearside at the weekend intent on addressing their own losing streak, things could yet get worse before they get better. The Black Cats are continuing to evaluate a series of potential candidates for the vacancy with Gus Poyet, Rene Meulensteen and senior professional development coach Ball, who has indicated his own interest in filling the role on a permanent basis, figuring prominently in the betting. last_img read more