Panorama Brings Top-Tier Lineup And Technology-Driven Experience To NYC [Photos]

first_imgPhoto: Chad Anderson Photo: Dave Vann Photo: Chad Anderson Photo: Chad Anderson Load remaining imagescenter_img Photo: Chad Anderson Panorama returned to New York City this weekend, and it featured one of the most eclectic and interesting festival lineups in the country. The festival boasted a little bit of something for everyone, with festival producers Goldenvoice delivering a mix of the reclusive Frank Ocean, Australian psychedelic powerhouse Tame Impala, British alt-groove heroes Alt J, modern pop icon Solange, 1990s juggernauts Nine Inch Nails, and A Tribe Called Quest for year two of the still-new-feeling NYC festival. Of course, the likes of MGMT, Justice, Nicolas Jaar, Tyler The Creator and Spoon were on hand to continue the festival’s diverse tone.The festival focuses on a more technology-driven experience, with several huge, lit-up installations by HP and American Express on site to help create a more festive vibe. The centerpiece of the festival is actually not anything related to music, however, it’s a huge space that can only properly be described as a pop-up museum dedicated to interactive, technology-based art known as The Lab, a collaboration between META and HP. The Lab, which returned as a bigger, better, more realized version from last year’s first edition of Panorama, featured multiple installations that all required some level of interaction with the technology and art. It was truly a sight to behold, and worth the price of admission for the festival alone.Outside of The Lab, there was plenty to experience at Panorama. The Point was an open-air club that allowed festival-goers to dance themselves clean, those who were 21+ could hang in a private area called The Grove with some higher end cocktails and lots of shade (sidebar: the average age at Panorama was noticeably higher than most other festivals, the whole venue felt like a 21+ area). The festival also featured some of the best foods that New York City has to offer, with favorites like Roberta’s Pizza, Salvation Taco, Oddfellow’s Ice Cream, and Matchabar being offered alongside festival favorites like Spicy Pie.Of course, the music at Panorama was amazing. Nine Inch Nails stunned the audience with their high-octane live show, A Tribe Called Quest threw themselves a huge sendoff for their final ever (probably?) NYC-area show, and Tame Impala melted faces with their comically psychedelic light show. Acts like Vince Staples and Glass Animals made the most of their big stage experience, getting broadcast across Randall’s Island on the festival’s huge, panoramic LED screens, giving these somewhat smaller artists the headliner treatment.While the festival did experience some production difficulties–namely, the collapse of the floor of the stage known as The Parlor, which led to several cancelled sets by artists like Breakbot and DJ Shadow–the festival once again boasted a relaxed vibe with plenty of space to sit and hang out with friends, short lines at almost every vendor, and great site lines from almost anywhere on the concert field.See below for a weekend’s-worth of photos from the great Chad Anderson!Panorama 1017 | Photos by Chad Anderson Photo: Chad Andersonlast_img read more

Saint Mary’s professor of economics dies

first_imgProfessor of business and economics Jerome “Jerry” L. McElroy, who taught at Saint Mary’s for 32 years, died Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014. He was 77 years old.McElroy was deeply invested in the life of the community at Saint Mary’s, vice president for college relations Shari Rodriguez said. When asked what he wanted to tell his colleagues and students, McElroy said, “Tell them I love them.”Rodriguez said students, alumnae and faculty loved McElroy right back, as expressed by College President Carol Ann Mooney.“Jerry was the consummate Saint Mary’s faculty member. A man of deep faith, this was not a job for Jerry, but a true vocation,” Mooney said. “He loved his students and colleagues and often demonstrated that love by sharing his beautiful poems with us. None of us will ever forget his warm smile and the countless contributions he made to generations of Saint Mary’s women.”McElroy began teaching at Saint Mary’s in the fall of 1982, and continued to teach through the fall 2014 semester. Jerry was honored with two faculty awards recognizing his excellence in teaching, the Maria Pieta Award in 1989 and the Spes Unica Award in 1997, Rodriguez said.McElroy was also a poet. He hosted annual readings at the College on themes of nature, the supernatural world, childhood on his grandfather’s farm and meditations on themes of grace. Most recently, McElroy offered a reading in October 2014 from his latest published chapbook, “Hidden Graces,” which was published by Finishing Line Press.At the reading, professor emeritus of religious studies Keith Egan introduced McElroy, stating that in McElroy’s lifetime, he has published more than 140 poems, published or co-published 17 books and monographs and produced nearly 142 scholarly papers, which resulted from McElroy’s research into the economies of the islands of the Caribbean.Beyond his admirable accomplishments, McElroy influenced many in the College’s community on a personal level, as shown by the hundreds of letters, notes and e-mails received by his wife of 43 years, Birdie Maria Rossow McElroy.“Each of those who wrote or called felt he [McElroy] knew them well, and they him,” Birdie McElroy said. “He was a spirit that transcended mere cursory knowledge: as one former student said, ‘He saw us.’ That is a rare gift and one that flowed naturally from Jerry, from a large heart, sharp mind, all encased in a soft demeanor and humor that delighted.”Birdie McElroy said although her husband’s five books of published poetry that contain some of her own artwork may not have eclipsed his economic research, his poetry helps distinguish McElroy as a true “Renaissance Man.”“His gift to me as my husband was an abiding love, a kindness that enveloped me, a support for my every endeavor and surely the greatest gift from one human being to another; the gift of knowing me deeply and accepting everything I am,” Birdie McElroy said.Close friend and colleague Richard Measell, who is the chair of the department of business and economics, said that besides being a true family man, McElroy was also a professional and reliable professor, who always sought excellence but not perfection, and handled others with grace and understanding.“Saint Mary’s has many truly outstanding people who have dedicated their lives to working here, but Jerry is part of the very few who definitely are the ‘best of the best,’” Measell said. “Throughout his years here, he demonstrated excellence in teaching, scholarship and service.“He loved his students dearly and always wanted them to learn as much as they could. … Jerry knew how to relate well to others and his rapport with his students was remarkable — leading many to stay in touch with him after graduation.”One of these former students, Courtney Parry, class of 2009, said she grew especially fond of McElroy, as the two worked together researching, conducting data analyses and writing reviews of several publications.“We worked well as a pair — he would identify a hypothesis (often in an area of island research, his specialty) and I would run the data to prove or disprove the hypothesis,” Parry said. “I would identify the needed datasets, clean the data and run the models.”The research Parry conducted for her senior thesis was used in an article Parry and McElroy co-published her senior year. Parry said she also helped McElroy with a second article after she had graduated.Parry said she will remember McElroy as a wonderful teacher and mentor along with his family who she grew close with over the years.“In many ways, they [the McElroy family] ‘are Saint Mary’s’ — kind, generous in spirit, faithful and supportive.”Tags: jerome mcelroy, jerry mcelroy, professor of economics, saint mary’s professor dieslast_img read more

November highest month for wildlife collisions; tips to reduce your risk

first_imgNovember is the worst month for wildlife collisions in the Peace Country, and the BC Conservation Foundation wants drivers to observe a few precautions to reduce their risk of hitting an animal on the road. Every year, approximately 31 animal strikes occur in the Fort St. John area during the month of November, contributing to a total of 19,600 animals killed by vehicles every year in British Columbia. Those accidents can often result in injury or worse; ICBC says provincially, more than 300 people are injured each year in these collisions, and RCMP figures indicate that on average, four people die each year in the province as a result of wildlife collisions.However, Gayle Hesse of the Wildlife Collision Prevention Program says there are easy ways to lessen the chance of hitting an animal on the road. Most importantly, drivers should reduce their speed, especially between the peak animal activity hours of 7 to 8am and 5 to 6pm. Hesse says it’s also important to resist the urge to speed through long flat stretches of road, as this is where most deer strikes occur. Additionally, drivers should be aware that deer often travel in pairs, so if one is in sight, there are likely more nearby.- Advertisement -As for the commercially available “deer whistles,” which are designed to frighten deer off the roadway by emitting a loud whistle, Hesse had this to say… [asset|aid=608|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=07b4c673922035baa40d9852a64fd86a-Hesse-Deer_1_Pub.mp3] More information on these tips can be found at www.wildlifecollisions.ca.Advertisementlast_img read more