Panel discusses gender and politics in the Andes

first_imgSubject of the documentaries “Soy Andina” and “Soy Andina II: The Return,” Nelida Silva spoke alongside associate producer of both films, Doris Loayza, and associate political science professor Guillermo Trejo in a panel discussion that examined local politics and gender in rural Peru.Silva said she was born and raised in the rural Andean town of Llamellin, Peru but moved to New York when she was young and lived there for 20 years. In New York, Silva said she worked as an accountant before eventually returning to her hometown.“I decided to back to my village to teach women, so they could earn some money,” she said.Silva said she was proposed as a candidate for mayor of Llamellin, though she initially struggled to decide whether or not to run for office.“I wasn’t sure,” she said. “Candidates are seen as corrupt people.”The documentary “Soy Andina II: The Return” details Silva’s campaign to be mayor. Silva said she ran on a platform of economic development and ultimately lost the election.Traditional gender roles often deter women from becoming involved in politics, but her candidacy demonstrates women’s capabilities, Silva said.“Despite the macho system, which is dominated by males, there is more space for women,” she said. “However, there were more receptive young people — some men, too, but not those who had a [stake] in politics.”Loayza said producing a movie featuring Silva’s political campaign was an arduous task that presented constant challenges, especially in terms of objectivity.“My role was not easy,” Loayza said. “We had to be objective.”Loayza said making two films about the same place brought about some challenges, especially concerning the locals’ perceptions of the documentaries.“The townspeople were developing the idea that the footage from the town was going to be big and disseminated internationally, which made it hard,” she said.Trejo said the film almost never discusses the country of Peru at large because Peruvian politics has a “more local dimension.”“There’s this idea that you leave but you never leave,” he said, “We are living in a reality with the question of universal citizenship. We are not trees. You don’t belong to one place.”According to Trejo, Silva’s gender played an integral role in the success of her campaign.“[Silva] was facing two enemies: political machines and the question of gender,” Trejo said. “It was interesting and infuriating. It is hard for a woman to be heard — not to speak up, because she was, but the audience wasn’t listening. It doesn’t matter if you have the [microphone].”Tags: Documentary, Peru, soy andinalast_img read more

UK National Employment Savings Trust appoints chief executive

first_imgDean began her secondment as interim director for policy and product development and became a permanent member in 2014, in a continuation of the role.Before her first secondment to PADA, Dean spent 30 years as a civil servant, lastly within the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) developing the policy that laid foundations for the creation of NEST.She also worked on the creation of the pension forecasting IT system, and policy that introduced the second-state pension, which allowed accrual based on national insurance contributions.Jones – who leaves after eight years with the provider, having served as its founding chief executive – will step down later this year.This week, NEST revealed its plans for its future offering after the UK government removed compulsory annuitisation.Dean will now oversee the implementation of a complex blend between income drawdown, deferred annuities and cash accounts, as the provider aims to create a default system for members. The UK’s National Employment Savings Trust (NEST) will appoint its head of product and marketing as chief executive after Tim Jones steps down later this year.Helen Dean will take on her new responsibilities in the autumn.Dean, currently an executive director, becomes NEST’s second chief executive.She was initially seconded from central government to the provider while it was still called the Personal Accounts Delivery Authority (PADA), before the official rollout of auto-enrolment.last_img read more