On the Blogs: Solar Battery Systems Gain Traction in New U.S. Markets

first_imgOn the Blogs: Solar Battery Systems Gain Traction in New U.S. Markets FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The first quarter of 2016 saw 18.3 megawatts of grid-interactive energy storage installed in the U.S., up 127 percent year-over-year and marking the largest first quarter in the history of the nation’s energy storage market, according to GTM Research’s Q2 2016 U.S. Energy Storage Monitor report. Historically, California has dominated residential energy storage deployments in the U.S. In Q1 2016, however, GTM Research observed growing deployments in a number of emerging state markets across the U.S., including Kentucky, Nevada, Utah and Vermont. While these individual markets are still quite small, collectively they accounted for the largest share of residential energy storage deployments in Q1 2016, surpassing even California and Hawaii. Energy storage system vendors are beginning to expand into “nontraditional” markets where few, if any, deployments have occurred before. Activities in these new markets speak both to customer interest and improving economic cases for storage. It’s unlikely that any of these state markets will come close to rivaling states like California or Hawaii in the near future, but nevertheless we’re witnessing an expansion of energy storage influenced by factors including new business cases for behind-the-meter storage.In particular, interest in aggregation of behind-the-meter assets is growing. Several U.S. utilities have already partnered with energy storage system vendors to pursue business models that offer the opportunity to leverage a fleet of residential energy storage systems to provide grid services. Green Mountain Power in Vermont begun shipping Tesla Powerwalls early in 2016, offering the option for customers to allow utility access to the systems in exchange for electricity bill credit; Green Mountain Power plans to utilize these storage systems to reduce capacity and transmission costs, as well as to provide energy arbitrage. Additionally, Sunverge has partnered with Glasgow Electric Plant Board in Kentucky to explore opportunities to leverage residential storage to provide services to the grid. Sunverge and SunPower are also working with Con Edison in New York to deploy residential storage as part of a virtual power plant trial project within the New York Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) program with the goal of exploring a new business model for utilities.Full item: The Growing Opportunity for Residential Energy Storage in the USlast_img read more

USC propelled to victory by 8th inning home run

first_imgThe Trojans took down the Loyola Marymount Lions 3-2 as junior shortstop Chase Bushor hit a go-ahead solo shot late in the eighth inning.Junior infielder Brandon Perez scores a run against LMU on Tuesday. Emily Smith | Daily TrojanThe Trojans entered their game against the Lions with confidence after sweeping the Villanova Wildcats over the weekend to extend their winning streak to six victories in a row. On the other hand, the Lions’ season has gone quite differently as they came into this game with a record of 1-6. However, despite their record, the Lions have kept all of their games close this season.The Trojans got off to an early lead in the first inning. Junior second baseman Brandon Perez got the inning started as he hit a double into center field with two outs, and junior first baseman Dillon Paulson soon followed that with a single to drive home Perez. The Trojans only managed to score one run in that inning, but the hitting did not stop there. In the second inning, the Trojans had two runners on first and third with junior left fielder Lars Nootbaar up to bat with two outs. Nootbaar, who leads the NCAA in walks and walks per game, hit a hard ground ball into second, and the second baseman made a great diving play to get Nootbaar out at first and save a run. In the third, the Trojans also left runners in scoring positions, however, but also unable to put runs on the board.Meanwhile, the Lions couldn’t get their bats going in the first two innings as senior pitcher Mason Perryman looked comfortable on the mound through the first two. However, in the third inning, Perryman walked right fielder Kenny Oyama who then stole second to get himself into scoring position. Afterward, infielder Nick Sogard hit a single into right-center field allowing Oyama to score. Sogard then stole second with two outs to get himself into scoring positions, but Perryman then struck out infielder Niko Decolati as the inning ended with one run apiece. Throughout the game the Lions looked for every opportunity they had to steal a base and get runners into scoring positions.Head coach Dan Hubbs soon made a pitching change, bringing on freshman pitcher Brian Gursky in the fourth inning. He managed to get the next three batters out with relative ease, keeping the Lions at one run through four innings of play.The Trojans great defensive play helped them get out of a tough fifth inning. With two runners on first and second and one out, a ball was hit to shortstop Bushor, who was able to make a play at second. Then Perez was unable to turn his throw to first into a double play, however, the Lions took an aggressive baser unning approach, sending their runner on third home, and first baseman Dillon Paulson made the throw to home to get the runner out and save a run. Prior to this game, the Trojans actually led the nation in fielding percentage, .996, with only one error allowed in their first seven games. USC then followed that great defensive inning with some strong offense, drawing a couple of walks, and eventually ended up scoring a run courtesy of redshirt junior infielder Angelo Armenta’s  sacrifice fly into deep center field with bases loaded, scoring Perez. That run gave them a 2-1 lead entering the sixth inning. In the top of seventh, the Lions were finally able to score with runners on base as first baseman Jamey Smart singled into left-center with runners on first and third right after coach Hubbs sent junior pitcher Brad Wegman to the mound. Eventually, the Trojans turned a double play to close the top of the seventh. The Trojans then were unable to capitalize with two runners in scoring positions as the score became 2-2 going into the eighth.The Trojans kept the Lions quiet in the top of the eighth and were able to capitalize with a big inning to take the lead. Bushor came up huge when he drove a ball deep into left field for a go-ahead home run to retake the lead 3-2 before going into the ninth.Sophomore pitcher Connor Lunn came into the game for the Trojans to close out the ninth inning. He looked impressive as he closed the game with three strikeouts in the ninth inning. The Trojans managed to win the nailbiter with the scoreline of 3-2 as their record improved to 7-1 on the season.“At the end of the day it doesn’t matter how we won, as long as we won,” Hubbs said. “I was proud of the guys. It’s not easy to win in Southern California on a Tuesday night. It’s just not. And you know everybody’s just kind of using guys that anybody they have available. So you don’t get to see a starter for six or seven innings necessarily so it’s not easy to get a hit.” The Trojans face a tough matchup in their weekend series as they face off against the fifth-best team in the country, the Arkansas Razorbacks, at Baum Stadium.last_img read more

Klitschko’s sparring partners fear for Tyson Fury: ‘There’s a huge difference in level’

first_imgTyson Fury is in line for an unforgettable destruction at the hands of Wladimir Klitschko, according to a report in Sunday’s papers.The Sunday Times spoke to several boxers who have dared to step foot in the ring with the world heavyweight champion, the journalist who wrote the piece coming to the question that Fury “will, for all his size and bluster, most likely be felled like some gigantic pine tree.”Sparring partner Adrian Granat, an unbeaten Swede who at 6’8” is just an inch shorter than Fury and two inches taller than Klitschko, put it this way: “Three rounds with Klitschko is like eight or nine with anyone else… If you don’t concentrate every second, you’re going to get punished.”Another, 6’8” Richard Towers from Sheffield, expanded on that: “We earn seriously good money,” he said. “But we earn it. Wladimir likes to land shots and he takes no prisoners.”I came here three years ago and he dropped me. I felt like I had never been in a ring before. “Now I’m better but I have to be very careful. When he throws a punch, nine out of 10 times it lands, and he’s always in position to throw shots.”He may be 39 now, but there’s no deterioration at all, believe me.” Fury takes on Klitschko next Saturday for the first time, but they almost faced off once before: the Anglo-Irish boxer himself was once called up to Klitschko’s training camp as a potential partner, but never got a chance to step in the ring.”According to Fury, that was because Klitschko was scared,” writes the Sunday Times’s Nick Pitt. “According to Klitschko, it was because Fury was so obviously raw that Klitschko’s trainer at the time, the late Emanuel Steward, decided he was not up to the task and should be spared a bad beating.”Towers added that he has huge regard for Fury, having sparred with him as well – but he still only sees one possible outcome for the bout. “Tyson is one of the best fighters I’ve shared a ring with,” Towers said. “He will be coming to fight and he’s very game. I wish him all the best, but there’s a huge difference in level. Wladimir is the complete professional and a very consistent performer… “Tyson will either be knocked out or beaten over 12 rounds.”– Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @Joy997FM. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more