Canada, Netherlands, U.K. Join List of Countries Turning Against Coal

first_imgCanada, Netherlands, U.K. Join List of Countries Turning Against Coal FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Power Magazine:The Netherlands, a country that recently commissioned three state-of-the-art coal plants and has been reluctant to close them, on October 10 moved to phase out coal power by 2030. Meanwhile, the U.K. and Canada this week jointly urged other nations to drop coal from their power profiles.The countries are part of a growing list that have vowed to phase-out or cut-back coal-fired power generation.  As part of a coalition agreement reached on October 10, Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s center-right government promised to phase out coal generation in the nation by 2030. But the agreement also binds the government to set a carbon floor price to cut carbon emissions by 2030 as well as to back stricter measures that would enable the European Union (EU) to meet targets under a 1.5-degree-C global warming scenario.Significantly, it imperils three 2015-commissioned coal-fired power plants, which have already been struggling economically. The plants’ owners, which include Engie, RWE, and Uniper, have separately noted that falling demand, low wholesale prices, and a surge of renewable energy capacity have rendered coal power unprofitable.A report published by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) last year documented how the three utilities had logged impairments worth billions of euros on the new power plants, concluding that political and market trends would drive valuations even lower.The Dutch government’s announcement on October 10 “highlights the risk of investing in either new or existing coal-fired power, and the lesson is clear: National coal phase-out plans such as this, combined with the rise of renewables and the impact on demand of improved efficiency, put old electricity-production models at risk,” IEEFA said in an update.Coal plants in Europe are also burdened with meeting stricter new air pollution limits for large combustion plants, which will require utilities to invest in new technology to retrofit coal plants, limit operations to 1,500 hours a year, or shutter facilities by 2021, it noted.More: The Netherlands to Quit Coal Power; UK and Canada Champion Global Transition Away from Coallast_img read more

Head to head: the controversial debate in New York over youth tackle football

first_img“If we see a danger to our children, we’re bound to act to correct it,” said Benedetto. That choice is one that New York State Public High School Athletic Association Executive Director Dr. Robert Zayas is advocating for. Beadle believes the decision should be left up to the parents, not the politicians, adding that for she and her husband, it’s still a very personal choice. Assemblyman Benedetto says he is still working with other legislators and he does not currently have a senate sponsor for the bill. As of right now, the decision remains up to the parents. Now pegged the “John Mackey Youth Football Protection Act,” Bronx Assemblyman Michael Benedetto originally introduced the bill in 2013. Some local parents disagree. Chenango Forks mother Jessica Beadle has two sons playing football. The evidence is limited, but Dr. Hanspal suggests even if there is no correlation, it is better to be safe, rather than sorry down the road. “We have to change the conversation to a football concussion debate or discussion to a sports safety concern.” Zayas added that placing an emphasis on football sends the wrong message to parents, saying “parents in other sports may be led to believe that concussion is a football injury, when that’s simply not the case.” Dr. Utsav Hanspal, a concussion specialist and Sports Medicine physician at Lourdes, argues that may not be the case. Dr. Hanspal says instead, “based on the number of concussions, or number of hits to the head, that would be a better predictor than how long you play a certain sport.” “To a certain degree, you have to take risks,” said Beadle. center_img The proposed legislation would place a ban on 12 and under tackle football. Assemblyman Benedetto points to science, arguing “the longer you play tackle football, the more apt you are to have problems later in life.” “Like” Nicole Menner on Facebook and “Follow” her on Twitter. In October, a hearing discussing the bill brought the subject to light once again. Dr. Zayas testified at the hearing, arguing that football isn’t the only sport to be concerned over. When you combine that with an even younger player, Dr. Hanspal says that is where the cause for concern may lie. “When you have injury to an immature brain, you may theoretically have higher rates of disruption which may take longer for the brain to heal itself.” Assemblyman Benedetto counters this, arguing other sports don’t compare. “Every play, the object is to hit the other player. Every play. And not just hit them, but to tackle them. To bring them violently down to the ground. And that’s why football more than any other sports, merits what I’m doing. (WBNG) — The future of football is in question. A proposed bill to ban twelve and under tackle football in New York state has parents, politicians, and professionals in the midst of a heated debate. Concussion experts agree, there may be reason to be concerned. Dr. Hanspal reminds us “concussions rates are still pretty high in football and those can have detrimental effects.” Her nine-year-old son Colin currently plays in the Chenango Forks youth league. When asked his favorite part of the game, Colin says it’s the hitting itself. “When you get a good hit off, it just feels great.”last_img read more