Canada, Netherlands, U.K. Join List of Countries Turning Against Coal

first_imgCanada, Netherlands, U.K. Join List of Countries Turning Against Coal FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Power Magazine:The Netherlands, a country that recently commissioned three state-of-the-art coal plants and has been reluctant to close them, on October 10 moved to phase out coal power by 2030. Meanwhile, the U.K. and Canada this week jointly urged other nations to drop coal from their power profiles.The countries are part of a growing list that have vowed to phase-out or cut-back coal-fired power generation.  As part of a coalition agreement reached on October 10, Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s center-right government promised to phase out coal generation in the nation by 2030. But the agreement also binds the government to set a carbon floor price to cut carbon emissions by 2030 as well as to back stricter measures that would enable the European Union (EU) to meet targets under a 1.5-degree-C global warming scenario.Significantly, it imperils three 2015-commissioned coal-fired power plants, which have already been struggling economically. The plants’ owners, which include Engie, RWE, and Uniper, have separately noted that falling demand, low wholesale prices, and a surge of renewable energy capacity have rendered coal power unprofitable.A report published by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) last year documented how the three utilities had logged impairments worth billions of euros on the new power plants, concluding that political and market trends would drive valuations even lower.The Dutch government’s announcement on October 10 “highlights the risk of investing in either new or existing coal-fired power, and the lesson is clear: National coal phase-out plans such as this, combined with the rise of renewables and the impact on demand of improved efficiency, put old electricity-production models at risk,” IEEFA said in an update.Coal plants in Europe are also burdened with meeting stricter new air pollution limits for large combustion plants, which will require utilities to invest in new technology to retrofit coal plants, limit operations to 1,500 hours a year, or shutter facilities by 2021, it noted.More: The Netherlands to Quit Coal Power; UK and Canada Champion Global Transition Away from Coallast_img read more

Seymour Topping, Former Times Journalist With an Enviable View of History, Dies at 98

first_imgNationalist forces in the field had surrendered. Nanking would soon be taken. The war was over.Mr. Topping, in his memoir, recalled the parting: “As I mounted my horse, Wu came up beside me, put his hand on the saddle, and said gently, speaking in English to me for the first time, ‘I hope to see you again. Peaceful journey. Goodbye.’” In the morning, after the guns fell silent, a “deputy commissar” calling himself Wu came to the hut and returned Mr. Topping’s confiscated typewriter and camera. A military escort and horses were waiting to take him back, Wu told him.“You know, I came here to tell your side of the story,” Mr. Topping said.“You cannot help us,” Wu said softly.- Advertisement – He was born Seymour Topolsky in Manhattan on Dec. 11, 1921, to Russian immigrants, Joseph and Anna Seidman Topolsky. His mother had seen her mother slain in a Cossack pogrom in a Jewish village in Ukraine. His father, who left behind relatives who were killed in the Holocaust, Anglicized the surname.As a teenager, Seymour read Edgar Snow’s epic “Red Star Over China,” and dreamed of being a foreign correspondent. After graduating from Evander Childs High School in the Bronx in 1939, he attended the University of Missouri, whose journalism school was the nation’s oldest and had good contacts in China. – Advertisement – He earned a degree in 1943, and as a member of the Reserve Officers Training Corps was called into the wartime Army and became an infantry officer in the Philippines, where he was discharged in 1946. Through contacts in Manila, he was hired by the International News Service and, while lacking experience, eagerly accepted an assignment to northern China, covering a decades-old civil war that had resumed with full fury after World War II.By 1949, after covering Chiang’s defeat in Manchuria and joining The A.P., Mr. Topping was in Nanking as Communist forces advanced on the Nationalist capital. He went to the front, crossed a no man’s land and was taken prisoner by Communist guerrillas. He thus became the only Western reporter with Mao’s forces as the decisive battle loomed.The captive was marched for miles to a field headquarters on a battleground cratered by shell fire and strewn with bodies and the wreckage of American-made Nationalist vehicles. At gunpoint, he was put into a hut, where he lay all night listening to the artillery.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more