Charlie Smith hunt big win against Mona

first_img NECK INJURY Former champions Charlie Smith High will be on the hunt for goals when they face lowly Mona High in the Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association (ISSA)-FLOW Manning Cup Group D football match at the Anthony Spaulding Sports Complex in Trench Town today, starting at 3:30 p.m. Charlie Smith have nine points, the same as Waterford High and Holy Trinity High in the group. However, Waterford enjoy a better goal difference ahead of Holy Trinity and Charlie Smith. Mona and Clan Carthy High are in fourth and fifth place, respectively, on one point apiece. With the return games in the preliminary stage set to begin today, Jerome Waite, head coach of Charlie Smith, says the group is competitive for the top spot, so winning the game against Mona by a wide margin is important. “First and foremost, the players have to dig themselves out of the situation. Waterford and Holy Trinity are good teams and that makes the group competitive,” Waite told The Gleaner yesterday. “I’m expecting the team to score (many) goals tomorrow (today) as we are currently in third position on goal difference,” he explained. “The Mona team is out of contention, but we can’t take them lightly. We have to go out there in a positive mindset,” Waite added. Charlie Smith will be without first-choice goalkeeper Shamarlee Clayton, who is out for about three weeks because of a neck injury sustained in the team’s 2-0 loss to Holy Trinity last Tuesday. In that game, Clayton was knocked down by a Holy Trinity player. Also, Kemar James was injured in the same game. “It will be a loss as the goalie (Clayton) is very competent. He will be replaced by DeAndre Hutchinson. It is a touch-and-go situation with Kemar James. I’m not sure if he will play,” Waite disclosed. McCauley McIntosh, Mona’s sportsmaster, says the spirit in the team is not high, following three losses and a draw in the first round. “Some of the players (have) lost the spirit of winning, especially the senior ones. The team is in turmoil,” McIntosh disclosed ahead of today’s match. “However, the team gave Charlie a good fight in the first game and promised to also give it their all against them again. I’m expecting another tough game,” he added. In the other Group E game of high interest, joint leaders Waterford and Holy Trinity are engaged in a crucial clash. Waterford edged Holy Trinity 1-0 in the first game two weeks ago. In a Group A encounter, Excelsior High are expected to again get the better of Tarrant High. In the first game, Excelsior drubbed Tarrant 4-0 at Excelsior two weeks ago. Today’s games Tarrant High vs Excelsior High Greater Portmore High vs Tivoli Gardens High Eltham High vs STATHS Holy Trinity vs Waterford Charlie Smith High vs Mona High (Home teams are named first and all games start at 3:30 p.m.)last_img read more

Football League announce proposal to introduce new league structure in 2019

first_img1 The proposal deals with the creation of four 20-team divisions The Football League has proposed the introduction of a fifth division in a radical shake-up of the English club game.The governing body wants four divisions of 20 teams below the Premier League by the 2019/20 season.With 24 teams currently in each Football League division, the plan raises the prospect of seven teams being relegated from the Championship in 2018/19 to allow for three to be promoted, while no clubs would drop out of League Two in that campaign.Two teams would be promoted from the National League and six other sides would be added to the newly-formed League Three, taking the total number of professional clubs to 100.The six additional clubs are likely to also come from the National League, although the proposals will reopen the debate on Scottish giants Rangers and Celtic playing in England.While not ruling out the involvement of the Glasgow clubs, Football League chief executive Shaun Harvey said such a move would be difficult.“The whole discussion can be had,” he said. “But I suspect the wider this gets drawn, the harder it would be to deliver to our clubs and the rest of the stakeholders in the game.”Football League clubs have been notified about the plan and will vote on the changes in June 2017. A 90 per cent approval rate, or 65 of the current 72 clubs, is required to get the go-ahead.Harvey says the plan, designed to alleviate fixture congestion by cutting down on midweek games, has the approval of both the Premier League and the Football Association.“The Football League has recognised that fixture congestion is one of the major issues facing the professional game in this country,” he said.“We have seen a number of public spats this year in relation to scheduling and dealt privately with many others. The season only has a number of finite dates, and they are sought by all of us to try to get our games on at prime times.“Fans and clubs have both suffered, in varying degrees, as a result of competition organisers having to move games to meet essential broadcasting requirements, increasing the move away from the traditional 3pm Saturday kick-off time.“Also midweek fixtures are often played at a distance and the crowds are usually well below the average.“To address the number of fixtures and create greater flexibility in the calendar, we are going to ask our clubs to consider a proposal towards altering the structure of our competition.”Should the proposal get the green light, Harvey also plans for discussions on implementing a winter break, scrapping FA Cup replays and moving entire rounds of the FA Cup to midweek slots. The future of the Community Shield will also be considered.The biggest obstacle facing Harvey is likely to be persuading Championship clubs to vote, like turkeys for Christmas, in favour of the changes knowing an extra four of them will find themselves a division further away from the Premier League.“Potentially, in the first year, of course,” said Harvey. “But thereafter your percentage chance of promotion is increased with four less teams. There’s always going to be that first year where that particular set of circumstances will prevail.“We are looking at change for 2019/20 so clubs have plenty of time to see this coming. We have to resolve how relegation and promotion would be dealt with in the lead-up to that period.”Harvey ruled out the possibility of Premier League clubs fielding so-called ‘B’ teams in the lower divisions, but they could be involved in a revamped Football League Trophy – until recently known as the Johnstone’s Paint Trophy.The Football League had consisted of four national divisions since 1958, when Divisions Three North and South were merged. The Premier League was formed in 1992, leaving the Football League as three divisionslast_img read more