Southern Vermont College dedicates Hunter Hall

first_imgSouthern Vermont College will dedicate on Saturday its newest addition to campus, the 41,000 square foot Hunter Hall, which includes living space for more than 110 additional students as well as a high tech Simulation Laboratory and a Science Laboratory for student learning, office and conference space, computer lab and Wellness Center. The SVC community has invited the public to join students, trustees, faculty and staff, public officials, major donors, and contractors for a special dedication and ribbon cutting ceremony, at 11 am in the Greenberg Atrium of Hunter Hall. The event will be followed by a reception and tours.“Southern Vermont College is very proud of this beautiful new addition,” said President Karen Gross, who remarked that it is the first major building the school has built in 17 years. “This is a multi-purpose structure that personifies all the possibilities a career launching education at SVC offers.” The facility includes a permanent state-of-the-art Simulation Lab where students in nursing and other health care programs can practice a wide range of skills on anatomically correct, computer programmed, interactive patient simulators. The Sim Lab, one of only a handful in the state of Vermont, provides a valuable, realistic tool for students in the burgeoning field of health care, according to SVC Division Nursing Chair Patricia Wrightsman. “Having a Sim family – father, mother (who gives birth), young child and infant – and the supporting technology, facilitates clinical training in all areas of patient care in the safety of an on-campus lab.”The living and learning spaces that comprise Hunter Hall and Greenberg Atrium were made possible by private donors, institutions and organizations, including donations by the late Irene Hunter of Manchester and by Norman and Selma Greenberg of Bennington. Support for the science labs came from several entities including Senior Whole Health, SVC trustee Deborah Wiley, Adirondack Audio & Visual, and Federal support secured with assistance from Senator Patrick Leahy. Significant donations of equipment from Rutland Regional Medical Center and Dartmouth Hitchcock.Medical Center also made the science labs possible.“This remarkable building happened because of the remarkable generosity and hard work of many individuals. The project, completed both on time and on budget, is cause for celebration,” Gross added. Reverend Jerrod Hugenot of the Bennington Interfaith Council and First Baptist Church will open the event with a non-sectarian dedication and Southern Vermont College Trustee Mary Wicker will speak on behalf of the College’s Board.The college broke ground on the $7.5 million building in June 2008 and was ready for students to occupy two of its wings in January 2009, a construction feat that is essentially unheard of, according to Chief Financial Officer James Beckwith. Beckwith credits the many local and regional contractors brought in for getting the job done in record time. Keeping this a project that would benefit local businesses was also a priority for SVC. “Most of the contractors were Bennington-based or resided within a 50 mile radius and most of the supplies were locally purchased,” Beckwith said. The new building uses many green technologies, including heavy insulation and efficient lighting.Founded in 1926, Southern Vermont College offers a career-enhancing, liberal arts education with 22 academic degree programs for approximately 500 students. Southern Vermont College recognizes the importance of educating students for the workplace of the twenty-first century and for lives as successful leaders in their communities. SVC’s intercollegiate athletics teams are part of the New England Collegiate Conference. The college is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.Source: SVC.last_img read more

What credit unions need to know about cannabis banking during the COVID-19 crisis

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Paul Dunford Paul is a co-founder & director of program development. Paul oversees the development and management of compliance programs for Green Check’s clients, with a focus on state-level compliance as … Web: https://www.greencheckverified.com Details I doubt whether it’s possible to find an industry that has not had to adjust in response to the COVID-19 crisis and that’s certainly the case with cannabis. With marijuana legal in some form (medical and/or adult-use) in 33 states and the District of Columbia, marijuana-related businesses (MRBs) play a significant role in local economies across the country, contributing tax revenue and offering employment in dispensaries, grow facilities and myriad ancillary businesses that support them. So, let’s look at how COVID-19 has affected MRBs, and why that’s potentially important to your credit union.Business ImpactMost states that have legalized marijuana have designated MRBs essential during this crisis so many have remained open when other businesses have had to close their doors. They have had to adjust to accommodate public health and social distancing concerns, so their day-to-day operations have had to change accordingly, but their sales have remained strong and largely returned to pre-crisis levels following an initial spike. What we’ve seen in practice is that operating models that weren’t previously legal or common under state programs, like curb-side sales and home deliveries, are now the norm.That’s not to say that marijuana-related businesses aren’t facing their own set of challenges. Notable among them is that they aren’t eligible to participate in any of the current federal stimulus programs, like SBA Loans or the Payroll Protection Program, because marijuana businesses remain federally illegal. However, the cannabis industry is pushing back hard against this restriction, citing their status as essential at the state level.Why does this matter to credit unions?If your credit union is already banking MRBs, you should reach out to them to understand how their operations have changed in response to public health concerns and check with your state cannabis authority to see how its program has been adjusted. For instance, medical marijuana businesses may be considered essential but adult-use ones may not.  Also, keep in mind that while these businesses have stayed strong during the crisis, should they find themselves struggling, they aren’t currently able to take advantage of federal stimulus programs.If your credit union has yet to engage with the cannabis industry because of concerns that it would negatively affect your reputation, the fact that many states consider MRBs to be essential demonstrates that the industry is far less taboo than it once was. If the fear of being the “weed credit union” has kept you from offering accounts to MRBs it may be time to reconsider that risk.State Legislative ImpactAt the start of the year, there were 31 formal ballot initiatives on the books in 15 states related to the legalization or decriminalization of marijuana, and the odds were that several of them would pass. In the Northeast, common wisdom was that New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut would pass adult-use (recreational) marijuana programs this year, but that’s no longer the case. As legislators have had to understandably refocus their efforts on mitigating the devastating effects of the coronavirus, most if not all of these initiatives are in a sort of limbo, where they are not technically off the agenda but unlikely to come up to a vote before the end of the current session. This has even delayed the rollout of programs that have already been approved, as in the case of Maine where their adult-use program was expected to go live early this summer but has now been postponed.Why does this matter to credit unions?Credit unions that anticipated the opportunity to expand their membership and open new cannabis business accounts may be disappointed this year because it is unlikely that states will expand the scope of their programs.Federal Legislative ImpactOn the federal level, the SAFE Banking Act, legislation that would provide regulatory and law-enforcement protection for financial institutions that provide services to legal cannabis businesses, looks like it has stalled in committee and won’t come to a vote in the Senate during this session. Many credit unions that are interested in offering cannabis banking programs have been waiting for this to pass, but it’s highly unlikely to happen this year.While the SAFE Banking Act isn’t going to pass, as mentioned previously some in Congress have called for state-legal cannabis businesses to be included in economic stimulus packages. To do so would require the federal government to afford protection for those credit unions that would process loan applications and disburse funds.Why does this matter to credit unions?While it is unlikely that the SAFE Banking Act will pass this year, if state-legal marijuana businesses become eligible for stimulus funding it would presumably require that the government extend protections to financial institutions that work with MRBs.If your credit union needs expert guidance on building a cannabis banking program from the ground up, download Green Check Verified’s guide for building a business case here.last_img read more