Texas Safety Commit Jamile Johnson Seems Unphased By Tim Irvin’s Flip To Auburn

first_imgTexas lost All-American Tim Irvin to Auburn after an official visit to the SEC power over the weekend, but one of the Longhorns’ other highly touted defensive back recruits doesn’t think it’s a big deal. Jamile Johnson, a three-star safety from Dallas, tweeted about Irvin’s flip, and doesn’t seem worried about the loss.So Tim Irvin is Gone Huh ! Cool ! #HookEm— Badger Jr. #⃣3⃣ (@MilJohnson) January 18, 2015Johnson’s also been retweeting numerous Texas fans’ words of encouragement after the news. miljohnsonRTTexas’ recruiting class is currently ranked 12th in the nation, even after the recent string of decommitments. All things considered, Charlie Strong is doing a good job of replenishing the talent in Austin.last_img read more

Bucks add pair of Beanielike backs Hyde joins OSU after year off

Anything worth having is worth waiting for.That old maxim applies to both Carlos Hyde’s yearlong wait to take the field with his Ohio State football teammates and also to the wait Buckeye fans have endured to see him suit up.Because when he does suit up, Carlos Hyde is impressive indeed.At an imposing 6-feet-1-inch and 230 pounds, Hyde is the type of big, physical back that gives opposing defensive coordinators fits, as well as any defensive backs unlucky enough to be caught in his path if he breaks into the secondary.The reason for Hyde’s wait is academic, literally. Reports indicate that Hyde did not manage a high enough ACT score to be eligible at the same time as his fellow recruits from last year’s class. He spent some time at the Fork Union Military Academy in Virginia while improving his score and he played on the post-graduate team there. In the process, he missed out on a Big Ten championship season and a Rose Bowl victory. Those should be reasons enough to drive the Naples High School product this season.When Hyde is on the field, he is a force. Over the span of his junior and senior years in high school, Hyde totaled 2,599 rushing yards to go with 29 touchdowns. A year ago, SuperPrep.com had him listed as the No. 61 overall prospect.The general consensus on Hyde amongst the many different recruit-monitoring Web sites is that he is a four-star talent. They all agree that his combination of size and strength will be a valuable asset to the OSU backfield.What remains to be seen is whether it will be as a change-of-pace runner or as a bruising back capable of carrying the ball 20 to 25 times a game, a la former Buckeye Chris “Beanie” Wells.Kevin Noon, managing editor of BuckeyeGrove.com, says the comparisons may not be fair and that Hyde will have a lot of work to do if he is to reach the level of production from Wells’ freshman year, which saw him play a key role in a victory over Michigan.“While Hyde is a physical runner, he is not as fast as Wells was when coming out of Akron Garfield,” Noon said.When Noon refers to Hyde as a physical runner, there is plenty of tape to back it up.  Hyde was originally listed as a fullback, and he was adept enough at the position to be listed as the No. 1 fullback prospect in the country by Scout.com and Rivals.com.But OSU coach Jim Tressel and his brother, running backs coach Dick Tressel, envision Hyde as a power-back to complement the speedsters who are already in a crowded OSU backfield.The Buckeyes return running backs by committee Dan “Boom” Herron and Brandon Saine, who handled the bulk of the duty last season, as well as speedster Jaamal Berry. That doesn’t even account for Hyde’s fellow incoming freshman back Roderick Smith.Noon sees Hyde with an advantage, as he is already enrolled at OSU.“He will have a leg up on other members of his class, being a year older,” Noon said. “He will be a solid change of pace for the Ohio State running game, being very unique to the current stable of runners.”Hyde came to the colder climes of Columbus from Naples, Fla. But he was not wholly unfamiliar with Ohio, as he has family in Cincinnati.The temperature change will be the least of Hyde’s worries as he adjusts to play in the physical Big Ten. Like any high school player transitioning to college, he may not be fully prepared for the sheer size of the defensive linemen and linebackers he will be facing on a routine basis. Steve Helwagen of Bucknuts.com thinks he has the skills to handle it.Helwagen describes Hyde as “a big power-back with deceptive fluidity between the tackles.” Helwagen said Hyde appears to be a strictly “north-south” runner when you look at his size, but that he will be able to surprise some with his quick first step.These will all be tools Hyde will need if he wants to join the pantheon of great running backs who have taken the field for the Scarlet and Gray. read more

North Dakota sweeps OSU in 2 physical matchups

The No. 8 North Dakota women’s hockey team swept Ohio State this weekend, winning two physical games by a goal each. OSU coach Jackie Barto sees these close losses as a positive, knowing her team is just one step away from getting over the top. “I thought we competed hard and played six good periods this weekend,” Barto said. The Buckeyes (14-14-2, 8-14-2-2 WCHA) have lost three games to the Fighting Sioux (17-8-3, 15-7-2-0 WCHA) by one goal this season, losing Friday, 4-3, in overtime and Saturday, 3-2. “We need to take that step and get over that last hurdle in these games,” Barto said. “Stay positive, keep working and keep getting after it.” On Saturday the Buckeyes led North Dakota in shots, 32-31, but failed to cash in on five power-play opportunities. “The power play never really got settled,” Barto said. “It’s a combination of winning face-offs, winning battles, outnumbering the puck, having good retrieval skills and then having the poise to set your power play up under pressure.” The referees had to break up a number of skirmishes over the weekend after a few big hits and several rushes on goal left players down on the ice. “We knew we were in a war and we had to battle,” Barto said. “North Dakota’s a physical team and the refs let them play.” Junior forward Laura McIntosh continued to shine, adding two more points to her career assists record and cashing in a goal this weekend. With the Buckeyes down, 1-0, on Saturday, McIntosh led a three-on-one breakaway that featured a nifty pass across the crease to junior defenseman Kelly Wild, who passed it back across the crease where sophomore forward Paige Semenza buried the puck in the net to tie the game. “When everyone gets involved it’s good for the team,” McIntosh said. “I think this weekend we played really well and a lot of people were involved.” The Buckeyes ran out of time in both games, though, as North Dakota scored with seconds left in overtime Friday night, and the Buckeyes failed to score in the third period Saturday. “Getting down to the end of the season we’re just gonna have to keep working hard,” McIntosh said. “Other teams know that we work hard, so if we keep doing that and battling through we’ll be good the rest of the way.” The Buckeyes host Minnesota Duluth (16-7-3, 14-7-3 WCHA) at 7 p.m. Friday and 4 p.m. Saturday at the OSU Ice Rink. “We need to keep our heads up,” senior defenseman Shannon Reilly said. “We played two awesome games this weekend and we didn’t get the bounces we wanted. I think that we can carry how hard everyone worked and gave 110 percent on every shift into next weekend and then the following weekend to come.” read more

Buckeyes earn No 4 seed in NCAA Tournament prepare to play UCF

After struggling through the heart of its season, the Ohio State women’s basketball team finished strong, winning its final nine games and earning a No. 4 seed in the NCAA Tournament. The Buckeyes (22-9, 10-6 Big Ten) are playing their first game of the tournament in Columbus against the University of Central Florida, the No. 13 seed in the Dayton region. If OSU beats the Knights (22-10, 12-4 C-USA), its second game will be against the winner of No. 5 Georgia Tech (23-10, 9-5 ACC) and No. 12 Bowling Green (28-4, 13-3 MAC), also in Columbus. Led by senior forward Jantel Lavender, four-time Big Ten Player of the Year, the Buckeyes will look to make a run out of Columbus, possibly to meet No. 1 Tennessee (31-2, 16-0 SEC) in Dayton. The No. 1 overall seed in the tournament is UConn (32-1, 16-0 Big East). The Huskies have won the NCAA Tournament championship the past two years, and look to repeat this year out of the Philadelphia region. OSU plays UCF in the first round at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at St. John Arena. read more

Tyler Engle leads Ohio State baseball pushes young teammates

With the Ohio State baseball team coming into the 2011 season with a new coaching staff and six first-time starters in the lineup, it’s imperative that there be senior leadership. Although senior shortstop Tyler Engle came into the year with the most games played for the team, he, like most of his teammates, struggled out of the gate. Engle has played in 190 games for OSU, starting 186. He made his first appearance as a Buckeye in the third game of the season against Seton Hall in 2008. He played his first game as the shortstop two games later, and took over as the starting shortstop that same year, March 9 against Connecticut. Through 18 games this year, OSU had an 8-10 record and was heading into Big Ten play with a weekend series against Northwestern. Engle went 1-for-3 as the Buckeyes had just defeated Xavier, 4-1, in OSU’s home opener. To that point, Engle was batting .214 and had racked up nine errors — both uncharacteristic numbers for the four-year starter. Before this season, Engle was a .252 career hitter and was coming off his best defensive season with just 10 errors. About the time of the Xavier game, Engle said he re-evaluated his season and decided it was time to step up his game as he had done many times for the Scarlet and Gray. He said he knew his days as a Buckeye were numbered. “It kind of hit me that I was having a rough year, and it’s about to end,” Engle said. “I only had so many days left to play as a Buckeye and play ball.” Coach Greg Beals agreed. “They can see the light at the end of the tunnel, and they’re trying to push that light further and further away,” Beals said. “They want to play as long as they can, and they’re just playing with great determination.” As Big Ten play began, Engle became a threat with his bat at the bottom of the lineup. He had the second-highest batting average on the team and the highest among Big Ten shortstops this year, .353 against conference opponents. “My approach is different at the plate,” he said. “I like to be more patient than I used to be. I was scared of striking out, and now they’re a part of the game.” Beals said Engle and senior third baseman Matt Streng’s second half of the season made an impact on the team’s young lineup. During that time, Engle raised his batting average to .275, which is tied for fourth on the team. “We need that leadership,” Beals said. “We need those seniors to pull the younger guys that don’t have that experience yet. If you look back four weeks in the season, it has been a huge boost to us.” Engle’s performance in Big Ten games is one of many reasons the Buckeyes were able to get back into the conference tournament a year after they barely missed playing in it. Engle said last year was disappointing and that, although several people counted out OSU early in the season, he is thankful to the coaching staff for keeping the team focused enough to play until the end. “We have a lot of young guys playing, and as a team we have never really thought that way,” Engle said. “The coaches would not allow us to get that way. They deserve a lot of credit for getting our minds right.” The Buckeyes begin the Big Ten Tournament at 12:05 p.m. today against Minnesota, and, for most of the team, it will be the first time playing postseason ball at the Division I level. It will be Engle’s sixth conference tournament game. Engle hails from the small town of Beverly, Ohio, about two hours southeast of Columbus. Playing at a big university such as OSU was a big deal for his hometown. When he signed with the Scarlet and Gray four years ago, it was front-page news in The Marietta Times. He said there would be a big Beverly crowd in the stands at Huntington Park and that he is happy his friends and family will be there. “It’s just a great atmosphere,” Engle said. read more

Spartans spoil Ohio States home win streak beat Buckeyes

The Ohio State men’s basketball team suffered its first home loss of the season Saturday, as Michigan State out-muscled the Buckeyes for a 58-48 win. The loss snapped a 39-game home win streak for OSU and dropped the Buckeyes into a tie atop the Big Ten standings. The Buckeyes struggled shooting all night and the Spartans found their edge inside, totaling 14 offensive rebounds for the game. OSU’s 48-point output was their lowest of the season. “I feel fortunate because I think they missed some shots they normally make,” MSU coach Tom Izzo said after the game. “Defensively we were as good as we’ve been all year.” MSU senior forward Draymond Green and sophomore center Adreian Payne dominated, combining for each of the Spartans’ first 15 points. It wasn’t until 9:12 remaining in the first half that another MSU player scored a bucket when sophomore Keith Appling hit a 3-pointer to give his team the 18-14 advantage. OSU went on a 3:46 scoring drought that saw MSU take an 8-point lead in the opening period. Sophomore guard Aaron Craft broke the streak with a pair of free throws and a 3-pointer from sophomore forward Jared Sullinger cut the lead to three. The Spartans continued to have success in the paint. Payne followed an MSU miss with his second tip-slam of the game and Sullinger had the ball poked away on the inside on the other end. The turnover by Sullinger — his fifth of the game — occurred with OSU trailing 33-25 with under a minute remaining in the half. An acrobatic layup by Appling gave MSU a 35-25 lead at intermission. “We looked out of synch,” Sullinger said of the Buckeyes’ first-half performance. “We didn’t run our offense.” The Buckeyes cut MSU’s lead to four at one point in the second half, but couldn’t get closer. OSU tried to work the ball into Sullinger down low throughout the final 20 minutes, but the Buckeyes’ big man continued to struggle finding his touch. Sullinger finished the game on 5-of-15 shooting. The rest of the Buckeyes didn’t fare much better as the team connected on just one of their first nine shots of the half. OSU head coach Thad Matta said the shots just weren’t falling. “We opened up the second half. We got the ball at the rim,” Matta said. “We’re getting fouled and it just wasn’t going in.” The Spartans’ lead swelled to 12, but an alley-oop finished by senior guard William Buford brought the sold-out crowd to its feet and cut the lead to 10 with 14:37 remaining. After an Appling layup with 11:48 remaining, the Buckeye defense stepped up and MSU was held scoreless for the next six minutes. Sullinger was able to put in a bucket from the left block and bring OSU’s deficit down to six, 44-38. He then connected again on a baseline jumper to bring OSU within four, but poor shooting killed any chance of an OSU comeback victory — the Buckeyes shot 26 percent from the floor and 13.3 percent from behind the arc. A layup by Green and pair of free throws by Appling again put MSU up by double digits and OSU never threatened again. Sullinger finished the game with 17 points and 16 rebounds, but also had 10 turnovers. He said MSU’s double team gave him trouble. “I wasn’t expecting the double because that’s not what Michigan State shows if you look at the film,” Sullinger said. “They had a great game plan and they stick to their system and that’s what happens when you stick to the system.” Craft added 15 points and was the only other Buckeye to finish in double figures. Payne was the high scorer for the Spartans finishing with 15 points, hitting all six of his shots. The loss drops OSU’s record to 21-4 overall and 9-3 in the conference. Matta said his team needs to move forward. “It’s got to be a learning experience for a relatively young basketball team,” Matta said. “You’ve got to stay together. You’re still sitting atop the conference. As a I told them, we’ll see what kind of team we have tomorrow.” OSU next travels to Minnesota where to take on the Golden Gophers Feb. 14. Tip is for 9 p.m. read more

Its Easier Than Ever to Not Compensate Interns But Theres a Catch

first_img Add to Queue Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Career and Workplace Expert; Founder and President, Come Recommended The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) recently updated its unpaid internship guidelines, and that’s good news for employers. The reason: Under the DOL’s former guidelines, if even one of the six factors it listed wasn’t met, interns were entitled to compensation.Related: 5 Ways Your Small Business Will Benefit From Hiring InternsBut, that’s changed: Now, companies are expected to meet a single central standard (determined by seven factors) to clarify who is the “primary beneficiary” in an unpaid intern-employer relationship. That primary beneficiary, of course, must be the intern.Among those factors are that both parties must understand there is no expectation of compensation or a job offer. And, the company hiring the intern must provide educational training and align that training with the intern’s formal education program and academic calendar.  Regardless of this newer, easier standard, however, unpaid internships remain a complicated subject. John S. Ho, partner and chair of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration practice at law firm Cozen O’Connor’s New York City office, explained just how complicated, saying that, “The analysis [of the primary beneficiary] depends on the unique circumstances of each case, giving businesses more flexibility to make their case that an intern is properly classified based on individual facts.”Here’s how the guidelines have changed and what these changes mean for employers:Both parties can now benefit.The old standard required that employers derive no benefit from the internship. Of course, some unscrupulous employers managed to squeeze valuable, unpaid labor out of their interns.But for the honest ones, the unrealistic former “no benefit” requirement tied companies’ hands and limited the experience that unpaid interns could receive.The new, seven-factor test, however, is more flexible. It allows employers to benefit from the intern’s activities as long as that young person remains the primary beneficiary of the relationship. For that to occur, employers must make sure they:Provide educational, hands-on training.Accommodate the intern’s academic commitments.Complement the work of their paid employees rather than displace them.Conclude the internship once the intern has learned all that he or she can from the experience.Overall, the employer should provide educational experience that meets specific learning objectives set prior to the internship’s start. Providing the intern descriptive materials akin to a university-style curriculum and syllabus might be helpful to ensure that “educational experience.”Related: Stop Delegating Social Media to Your InternsIn addition,employers should meet with their interns reguarly to discuss their progress, ideas and goals. That way, they can provide a more personalized and educational internship experience.   The experience must be good — but not too good.While reviewing a client’s internship program, Joey Price, founder and owner of Jumpstart:HR, LLC, an HR outsourcing and consulting firm in Baltimore, heard multiple negative reviews from interns.The company the interns had gone to work for made sure the interns received daily lunches, solid work experiences and materials. But, the interns’ lack of payment still prevented the program from being a success. The reason was the work’s revenue-generating nature.“I advised my client that any time an ‘intern’ . . . is focused primarily on revenue-generating activity, it is no longer an internship,” Price explained. In essence, the client was teaching interns how to trade, giving them funds to manage and then monitoring the progress of those trades. And this went against the idea of complementing, rather than displacing, the work of paid employees — one of the seven factors in the new unpaid internship guidelines.So, while an intern’s experience with a company should be good, it shouldn’t be so good that it takes the place of paid employees’ work. And that means focusing on the educational aspect of the internship above all else.To do this, Ryan Glasgow, a labor and employment partner at the law firm Hunton & Williams LLP in its Richmond, Va., office, suggested the need to connect internships with college educational programs and the college or university’s system for offering academic credit.Glasgow also said he finds it important for internships to go beyond the work experience offered in the typical office. This could mean adding in classes and educational programs, Glasgow said, so that students receive training in a university-like environment.The DOL internship guidelines aren’t mandatory, but they demand your respect, nonetheless.Because the DOL is not a legislative body, the primary beneficiary intern test it provides is merely a guideline for unpaid internship programs. If there is a grievance, no judge will arbitrate.Despite that fact, said Dan Kalish, the managing partner at law firm HKM Employment Attorneys LLP’s office in Seattle, Wash., leaders should still proceed with caution. “Even if an employer meets the federal test to have an unpaid internship, it is possible that the employer will not meet the state law requirements to have an unpaid internship; and the employer would have to pay the intern in accordance with the state law,” Kalish told me by email.Related: Paying Interns Is a Good Investment In the Future of Your Business To keep small companies safe and both parties happy, therefore, consult an employment lawyer if you have any doubts about your internship program. Then, go out and create a program that will be an unforgettable experience for those students lucky enough to be accepted to it. Image credit: Shutterstock Internships Next Article Contributor 5 min read Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. The days of interns’ long hours and endless coffee runs are hopefully ending, thanks to new federal guidelines. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Heather R. Huhman February 1, 2018 It’s Easier Than Ever to Not Compensate Interns, But There’s a Catch. –shares Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

Researchers identify cause of inherited metabolic disorder

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 16 2019A new study from BC Children’s Hospital, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and an international team of researchers published in the New England Journal of Medicine is the first to identify a rarely-seen type of DNA mutation as the cause of an inherited metabolic disorder.Inherited metabolic disorders — where the body can’t break down specific nutrients from food leading to a range of serious health problems — are often caused by a defective gene.In this important study, researchers found an unusual genetic mutation behind three children’s undiagnosed, degenerative conditions: a repeat expansion of DNA. In this specific mutation, the gene appears undamaged but does not function because the DNA adjacent to it has extended several hundred times its normal length.”To detect this kind of DNA multiplication, you can only use whole genome sequencing and have to search through billions of pieces of DNA; it’s truly a search for the needle in the haystack,” said lead author Dr. Clara van Karnebeek. “With our new approach we have finally solved our mystery cases, and we now expect to find the genetic cause of other, as of yet unexplained, genetic metabolic diseases.”To date, DNA repeat expansions have been linked to approximately 30 different diseases.”For kids with rare diseases and their families, finding the root causes of their disorders is tremendously important,” said Dr. Wyeth Wasserman, a co-author of the study. “A diagnosis gives us the potential to intervene, relieves undeserved parental guilt, and provides insights into more common diseases.”For a child with an unexplained medical condition, a diagnosis lays the groundwork for further research that could lead to new interventions such as gene therapy aimed at “turning on” the impaired gene, dietary modification or supplements that provide the nutrients the body is missing. Effective treatment can slow or stop damaging symptoms, improving the quality of life of children with rare disorders and their families.In this study, initial work by van Karnebeek and her research team narrowed the search for the genetic causes of this rare disorder to key areas of the genome. However, after further investigations using exome sequencing and whole genome sequencing, the international research team couldn’t pinpoint the error in the DNA.Related StoriesMolecular switches may control lifespan and healthspan separately, genetic discovery suggestsFungal infection study identifies specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong peopleResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeIt’s here that researchers at BC Children’s took a novel approach. Through in-depth, manual analysis and the use of emerging bioinformatics tools and techniques study co-authors Dr. Britt Drögemöller and Phillip Richmond discovered and confirmed that the gene responsible for the disorder was intact but a repeat expansion error prevented it from functioning.”In our search, we focused on variations that would have been hard to discover through exome sequencing” said Drögemöller. “After months of experimenting with various different analyses, we finally uncovered this novel genetic variant by using new targeted approaches aimed at identifying DNA repeat expansions.””These findings were made possible by a multidisciplinary approach and advances in technology, techniques and software,” said Richmond. “It wouldn’t have been possible as recently as two years ago and, most importantly, it shows us what to look for in other undiagnosed cases.”The gene identified as the cause of this particular disorder is an enzyme that enables the body to turn an amino acid called glutamine into glutamate. More work is needed to determine how exactly this genetic error leads to disease, but it’s likely that either a build-up of glutamine or the lack of glutamate caused the children’s serious developmental delays and disabilities including difficulty with language, speech, balance and coordination.Through collaborations with sequencing consortiums around the world, researchers were able to confirm that this particular repeat expansion was found in only 1 in 8,000 people, establishing the mutation as very rare.Over one million Canadians suffer from a rare disease and in over 50 per cent of these cases, the underlying genetic cause of the illness remains unknown.”We can do better for children with rare diseases. For the 50 per cent who can’t find answers, this discovery and new approach will help us dig in and potentially find the causes of their disease,” said Richmond. Source:https://www.ubc.ca/last_img read more

US launches probe of Frances planned tech giants tax

first_img Citation: US launches probe of France’s planned tech giants tax (2019, July 11) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-07-probe-france-tech-giants-tax.html © 2019 AFP The probe into unfair trade practices could pave the way for Washington to impose punitive tariffs—something Trump has done repeatedly since taking office. And it adds yet another bone of contention in the transatlantic trade disputes that now also include trade in steel, aluminum, automobiles, aircraft and agriculture.”The United States is very concerned that the digital services tax which is expected to pass the French Senate tomorrow unfairly targets American companies,” US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said in a statement.The proposed three percent tax on total annual revenues of companies providing services to French consumers only applies to the largest tech companies, “where US firms are global leaders,” the trade representative’s office said.Some internet heavyweights have taken advantage of low-tax jurisdictions in places like Ireland while paying next to nothing in other countries where they derive huge profits.The so-called Section 301 investigation is the primary tool the Trump administration has used in the trade war with China to justify tariffs against what the United States says are unfair trade practices.Addressing the conundrumThe US Trade Representative’s office will hold hearings to allow for public comment on the issue over several weeks before issuing a final report with a recommendation on any actions to take.Despite the objections to the French tax proposal, however, the statement said the United States will continue to work with other advanced economies to address the conundrum of how to tax tech companies.The United States is pushing for an overarching agreement on taxation through the Group of 20 economic forum, something supported by Google.The company said last month the change would probably mean Silicon Valley tech giants would pay less in the United States and more in other jurisdictions, in a departure from the longstanding practice of paying most taxes in a company’s home country.Group of 20 finance ministers last month also said they “welcomed” proposed measures from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a forum for advanced economies, to revamp international rules on corporate taxation.”We will redouble our efforts for a consensus-based solution with a final report by 2020,” they said in a statement.The Computer & Communications Industry Association on Wednesday applauded the US Trade Representative’s move, saying the French tax would retroactively require US internet giants operating in France to turn over a percentage of their revenues from the beginning of this year and violates international trade commitments.”This is a critical step toward preventing protectionist taxes on global trade,” CCIA official Matt Schruers said in a statement.”CCIA encourages France to lead the effort toward more ambitious global tax reform, instead of the discriminatory national tax measures that harm global trade.” “The United States is very concerned that the digital services tax which is expected to pass the French Senate tomorrow unfairly targets American companies,” US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said in a statement Explore furthercenter_img US President Donald Trump has ordered an investigation into France’s planned tax on internet services that will hit American tech giants especially hard, officials said Wednesday. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Google endorses ‘international tax deal’ for multinationalslast_img read more

Now Mehul Choksi blames untimely typhoon in Antigua for delayed courier to

first_img India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 15:01 IST Mehul Choksi is wanted for allegedly defrauding the PNB to the tune of Rs 13,400 crore. (File)HIGHLIGHTSMehul Choksi says he couldn’t send documents due to untimely typhoon Antigua and BarbudaMehul Choksi said once the situation came under control, he sent the documents through courier on June 24Fugitive diamantaire Mehul Choksi is an accused in PNB fraud caseFugitive diamantaire Mehul Choksi, accused in the PNB fraud case, has claimed that he was unable to send documents to his lawyer in Bombay to challenge a court’s January order in the Bombay High Court within the mandated 30 days due to an “untimely typhoon” in Antigua and Barbuda.A special court in Mumbai had in January dismissed applications filed by Mehul Choksi for cross-examination of witnesses in the Punjab National Bank (PNB) fraud case.After the plea was dismissed, the Enforcement Directorate (ED) looked to declare Choksi a Fugitive Economic Offenders under the Fugitive Economic Offenders (FEO) Act.Mehul Choksi is at present based in the Caribbean nation of Antigua. India has sought his extradition from that country and an Interpol arrest warrant has also been issued against him.In an application filed in the Bombay High Court, Mehul Choksi said he was unable to courier the required legal documents due to typhoon and so wanted to now challenged the order in the high court.”It wasn’t easy for the applicant and his counsel to co-ordinate with each other and take necessary and immediate recourse for filing of the present application. However, the counsel took all possible efforts to co- ordinate with the applicant and get the signed vakalatnamas from Antigua. However, the counsel failed to get vakalatnamas within the limitation period due to untimely typhoon at Antigua which created chaos and also interrupted the courier service,” Mehul Choksi’s application stated.Mehul Choksi added that once the situation in Antigua came under control, he sent the documents through courier service on June 24.Choksi and his nephew Nirav Modi are the two key accused wanted by the ED and the Central Bureau of Investigation for allegedly defrauding the Punjab National Bank (PNB) to the tune of Rs 13,400 crore in collusion with a few employees of the government-run lender.The multi-crore fraud came to light in early 2018. Both Mehul Choksi and Nirav Modi had fled the country before that. On July 8 last year, when Mehul Choksi landed in Antigua’s capital St John’s, he used his newly obtained Antiguan passport for the first time and acquired the citizenship.On Thursday, ED attached assets worth Rs 24.77 crore in India and abroad of fugitive diamond jeweller Mehul Choksi, accused in the fraud case.The attached properties include three commercial assets based in Dubai, a Mercedes Benz car and a number of fixed deposits in bank accounts in the country and outside, the agency said. The total value of the attached properties is Rs 24.77 crore, it said.(with inputs from Munish Chandra)READ | ED attaches Dubai properties of Mehul Choksi worth Rs 24.77 croreWATCH | Choksi will soon be extradited to India?For the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySumeda Tags :Follow Mehul Choksi Now, Mehul Choksi blames untimely typhoon in Antigua for delayed courier to Bombay lawyerFugitive diamantaire Mehul Choksi has blamed typhoon in Antigua and Barbuda for being unable to send documents to his Bombay legal team.advertisement Nextlast_img read more

Sri Lankan Navy detains 6 Indian fishermen near Delft Island

first_imgSri Lankan Navy detains 6 Indian fishermen near Delft IslandThe Lankan Naval personnel were on a routine patroladvertisement Next Asian News International RameswaramJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 14:22 IST Photo: ANISri Lankan Navy apprehended six Indian fishermen from Namputhalai near Delft Island on Friday morning.The Lankan Naval personnel were on a routine patrol onboard a Fast Attack Craft attached to the Northern Naval Command.They apprehended one country boat with six fishermen for poaching in the Sri Lankan territorial waters.Straying of Indian and Sri Lankan fishermen into each others’ waters is a recurrent problem as territories on the sea are not clearly demarcated.Also read: 27 Indian fishermen arrested by Sri Lankan navyALSO WATCH| Sri Lankan Navy arrests 12 Indian fishermenFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byIram Ara Ibrahimlast_img read more