Aguero to expect game time and bench duty

first_imgManchester City Guardiola tells Aguero to expect game time and bench duty at Man City Last updated 2 years ago 16:38 9/9/2017 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Sergio Aguero Gabriel Jesus Manchester City Getty Images Manchester City Sergio Agüero Premier League Guardiola The Argentine striker has been promised regular outings by Pep Guardiola, but also warned that he needs to accept rotation in a star-studded squad Sergio Aguero has been told he will play “a lot of games” at Manchester City, but Pep Guardiola has warned him to also expect time on the bench.The Argentine has been an almost guaranteed starter when fit throughout much of his time in England.Feyenoord 11/2 to beat Man City Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing He was, however, dropped on occasions last season – Guardiola’s first at the helm – and has already been named among the substitutes this term.Aguero has been told that he must accept rotation within a star-studded squad, with the 29-year-old part of a system which includes Gabriel Jesus as a partner or alternative, as well as the option for a ‘false nine’ approach to be taken.Guardiola told reporters on his striking selection plans: “I said many times, Aguero is going to play a lot of games, sometimes he’s not going to play. I know it’s something special when a player who’s never rotated.“He’s going to play like last season – a lot, a lot of games.“I think he played, when fit, maybe 90 per cent of the games, especially in the important games, he was always there.“So maybe one day we decide we’ll only play with one striker, sometimes with Gabriel, sometimes with two, sometimes we’ll play with neither, maybe Sergio and Gabriel won’t play and we’ll play a false nine.”Aguero will be hoping to see minutes in a crunch clash with Liverpool on Saturday lunchtime, as City play host to a fellow Premier League title hopeful at the Etihad Stadium.last_img read more

25 days agoRodgers plays down Leicester top-four chances

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Rodgers plays down Leicester top-four chancesby Paul Vegas25 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrendan Rodgers has played down Leicester City’s chances of breaking into the top-four.The Foxes were in scintillating form in Sunday’s 5-0 thrashing of Newcastle United.The win leaves the 2016 Premier League title winners in third place, but Rodgers has cooled expectations of his side.”It’s very early in the season,” said the Northern Irishman.”We know it’s a big ask because of all the other clubs that have been regulars there. We are only really focusing on how we play, looking at our performance levels.” last_img read more

Ottawas toughoncrime agenda will push more Aboriginal women into doing hard time

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe number of Aboriginal women going to prison is exploding.According to a new report, the Conservative’s tough-on-crime agenda will mean those numbers will increase.APTN National News reporter Annette Francis has this story.last_img

Ohio State womens lacrosse heads to Rutgers after first loss since February

OSU senior attacker Cian Dabrowski (14) fires a shot in a game against Penn State on April 9. OSU won, 16-13. Credit: Courtesy of OSUA short memory often one of the keys to any successful athlete. The No. 9 Ohio state women’s lacrosse team will have to put that skill to the test as it regroups from a blowout loss and travels to Rutgers for a Thursday evening matchup.The first setback OSU (11-2, 2-1) faced in 55 days was a 15-5 loss at No. 1 Maryland last weekend which ended its nine-game winning streak. If they’re able to bounce back with a win over Rutgers (3-11, 0-3), the Buckeyes would end being no worse than the No. 2 seed in the 2016 Big Ten tournament. Rutgers is coming off a 20-9 loss to Northwestern. The Buckeyes are 3-1 all-time against the Scarlet Knights, as they beat Rutgers 17-7 in the 2015 Big Ten tournament quarterfinals, as well as twice in conference play.A closer look at OSUOSU has decorated players all over the field that play a huge role in the team’s success.Sophomore attacker Molly Wood ranks 13th in the country with 4.7 draws per game and is on track to set an OSU single-season record. Wood is also second on the team with 30 goals, and is one of only two Buckeyes to score a goal in every game this season.Senior attackers Cian Dabrowski and Rainey Hodgson rank in the top five in the Big Ten in almost every offensive category. Dabrowski leads OSU and ranks second in the Big Ten with three goals per game and leads with 4.1 points per match. Hodgson ranks second in the Big Ten with 3.8 points per game and is first with 1.9 assists per contest.Defensively, senior goalkeeper Katie Frederick is 11-2 as a first-year starter. Frederick is third in the conference with 6.46 saves per game.As a team, OSU ranks second in the Big Ten in shot percentage and goals against, and sits third for goals, assists, draw controls and saves.Game time against the Scarlet Knights is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Thursday in Piscataway, New Jersey.Up nextThe Buckeyes are set to return home and get back on the field quickly when they welcome No. 6 Notre Dame to Ohio Stadium at 3 p.m. on Saturday. read more

North Dakota sweeps OSU in 2 physical matchups

The No. 8 North Dakota women’s hockey team swept Ohio State this weekend, winning two physical games by a goal each. OSU coach Jackie Barto sees these close losses as a positive, knowing her team is just one step away from getting over the top. “I thought we competed hard and played six good periods this weekend,” Barto said. The Buckeyes (14-14-2, 8-14-2-2 WCHA) have lost three games to the Fighting Sioux (17-8-3, 15-7-2-0 WCHA) by one goal this season, losing Friday, 4-3, in overtime and Saturday, 3-2. “We need to take that step and get over that last hurdle in these games,” Barto said. “Stay positive, keep working and keep getting after it.” On Saturday the Buckeyes led North Dakota in shots, 32-31, but failed to cash in on five power-play opportunities. “The power play never really got settled,” Barto said. “It’s a combination of winning face-offs, winning battles, outnumbering the puck, having good retrieval skills and then having the poise to set your power play up under pressure.” The referees had to break up a number of skirmishes over the weekend after a few big hits and several rushes on goal left players down on the ice. “We knew we were in a war and we had to battle,” Barto said. “North Dakota’s a physical team and the refs let them play.” Junior forward Laura McIntosh continued to shine, adding two more points to her career assists record and cashing in a goal this weekend. With the Buckeyes down, 1-0, on Saturday, McIntosh led a three-on-one breakaway that featured a nifty pass across the crease to junior defenseman Kelly Wild, who passed it back across the crease where sophomore forward Paige Semenza buried the puck in the net to tie the game. “When everyone gets involved it’s good for the team,” McIntosh said. “I think this weekend we played really well and a lot of people were involved.” The Buckeyes ran out of time in both games, though, as North Dakota scored with seconds left in overtime Friday night, and the Buckeyes failed to score in the third period Saturday. “Getting down to the end of the season we’re just gonna have to keep working hard,” McIntosh said. “Other teams know that we work hard, so if we keep doing that and battling through we’ll be good the rest of the way.” The Buckeyes host Minnesota Duluth (16-7-3, 14-7-3 WCHA) at 7 p.m. Friday and 4 p.m. Saturday at the OSU Ice Rink. “We need to keep our heads up,” senior defenseman Shannon Reilly said. “We played two awesome games this weekend and we didn’t get the bounces we wanted. I think that we can carry how hard everyone worked and gave 110 percent on every shift into next weekend and then the following weekend to come.” read more

Tyler Engle leads Ohio State baseball pushes young teammates

With the Ohio State baseball team coming into the 2011 season with a new coaching staff and six first-time starters in the lineup, it’s imperative that there be senior leadership. Although senior shortstop Tyler Engle came into the year with the most games played for the team, he, like most of his teammates, struggled out of the gate. Engle has played in 190 games for OSU, starting 186. He made his first appearance as a Buckeye in the third game of the season against Seton Hall in 2008. He played his first game as the shortstop two games later, and took over as the starting shortstop that same year, March 9 against Connecticut. Through 18 games this year, OSU had an 8-10 record and was heading into Big Ten play with a weekend series against Northwestern. Engle went 1-for-3 as the Buckeyes had just defeated Xavier, 4-1, in OSU’s home opener. To that point, Engle was batting .214 and had racked up nine errors — both uncharacteristic numbers for the four-year starter. Before this season, Engle was a .252 career hitter and was coming off his best defensive season with just 10 errors. About the time of the Xavier game, Engle said he re-evaluated his season and decided it was time to step up his game as he had done many times for the Scarlet and Gray. He said he knew his days as a Buckeye were numbered. “It kind of hit me that I was having a rough year, and it’s about to end,” Engle said. “I only had so many days left to play as a Buckeye and play ball.” Coach Greg Beals agreed. “They can see the light at the end of the tunnel, and they’re trying to push that light further and further away,” Beals said. “They want to play as long as they can, and they’re just playing with great determination.” As Big Ten play began, Engle became a threat with his bat at the bottom of the lineup. He had the second-highest batting average on the team and the highest among Big Ten shortstops this year, .353 against conference opponents. “My approach is different at the plate,” he said. “I like to be more patient than I used to be. I was scared of striking out, and now they’re a part of the game.” Beals said Engle and senior third baseman Matt Streng’s second half of the season made an impact on the team’s young lineup. During that time, Engle raised his batting average to .275, which is tied for fourth on the team. “We need that leadership,” Beals said. “We need those seniors to pull the younger guys that don’t have that experience yet. If you look back four weeks in the season, it has been a huge boost to us.” Engle’s performance in Big Ten games is one of many reasons the Buckeyes were able to get back into the conference tournament a year after they barely missed playing in it. Engle said last year was disappointing and that, although several people counted out OSU early in the season, he is thankful to the coaching staff for keeping the team focused enough to play until the end. “We have a lot of young guys playing, and as a team we have never really thought that way,” Engle said. “The coaches would not allow us to get that way. They deserve a lot of credit for getting our minds right.” The Buckeyes begin the Big Ten Tournament at 12:05 p.m. today against Minnesota, and, for most of the team, it will be the first time playing postseason ball at the Division I level. It will be Engle’s sixth conference tournament game. Engle hails from the small town of Beverly, Ohio, about two hours southeast of Columbus. Playing at a big university such as OSU was a big deal for his hometown. When he signed with the Scarlet and Gray four years ago, it was front-page news in The Marietta Times. He said there would be a big Beverly crowd in the stands at Huntington Park and that he is happy his friends and family will be there. “It’s just a great atmosphere,” Engle said. read more

FTC Sues Amazon Over Kids Unauthorized InApp Purchases

first_img Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 2 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.center_img Amazon employees said they had a “house on fire” on their hands. And indeed they do.The Federal Trade Commission filed a complaint in federal court today that claims Amazon allowed millions of dollars in in-app charges made by children without parental consent.The suit alleges Amazon’s in-app system permitted children to rack up unauthorized charges for purchases in apps such as “Ice Age Village,” where players use real money to buy virtual acorns and coins for use in the game.Related: Google to Offer Business Owners 2 TB of Free Storage for a Year“Even Amazon’s own employees recognized the serious problem its process created. We are seeking refunds for affected parents and a court order to ensure that Amazon gets parents’ consent for in-app purchases,” said FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez, in a written statement.Amazon employees called the unauthorized billing dilemma a “near house on fire,” according to internal emails the FTC found.When kids download games on mobile devices, it is sometimes unclear which virtual items cost real money and which cost virtual money, the FTC statement says. In March 2012, Amazon required a parental password to spend more than $20 on a virtual item. Further, in 2013, a complaint against Amazon argued that even when a parent was prompted to insert a password, that would lift the veil, allowing kids to make charges without needing another password re-entry for anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour.Related: How You, the Local Business Owner, Can Take on AmazonOne little girl had made $358.42 in charges through these applications without her mother knowing, according to the FTC statement. Charges made inside of an app are nonrefundable.The FTC’s litigation against Amazon follows a similar case that the U.S. regulators brought against Apple earlier this year. Apple settled the complaint for $32.5 million. “You cannot charge consumers for purchases they did not authorize,” Ramirez said when Apple settled.Apparently, Amazon still could.Related: Google Gunning for Amazon With Expansion of Same-Day Delivery July 10, 2014last_img read more

Heise invites residents to March office hours to discuss state and local

first_img Categories: News 26Feb Heise invites residents to March office hours to discuss state and local issues State Rep. Kurt Heise invites residents of the 20th District to meet with him during office hours in March.Heise’s office hours are scheduled for Monday, March 9, at the following times and locations:In Canton at Parthenon Coney Island, 39910 Ford Road from 10 to 11 a.m.;In Northville at Northville District Library, 212 W. Cady St. from 12 to 1 p.m; andIn Plymouth at Plymouth District Library, 223 S. Main St. from 3 to 4 p.m.“I always look forward to meeting with the members of our community so that I can listen to every voice that needs to be heard,” said Heise, R-Plymouth. “The most important job I have is to be a productive liaison between my neighbors and Lansing.”No appointments are necessary for these office hours. Residents who are not able to attend are encouraged to contact Heise’s office by phone at 1-855-REPKURT, or by email at KurtHeise@house.mi.gov.###last_img read more

Sky Deutschland will add Netflix to its Sky Q offe

first_imgSky Deutschland will add Netflix to its Sky Q offering tomorrow as part of a new Entertainment Plus package, with Netflix recommendations and search integrated as part of the Sky Q experience.The new package, which will be available to Sky subscribers in Germany and Austria, will combine Sky original productions, international series, Sky box sets and a range of linear channels as well as Netflix, according to the operator.Entertainment Plus will give access to the Netflix standard offering, which provides up to two simultaneous HD streams, bringing shows including Narcos, Stranger Things and upcoming German-language original Dogs of Berlin to Sky Q users.Non-Netflix shows available as part of Entertainment Plus include Sky originals Das Boot, Der Pass and Acht Tage as well as HBO’s Game of Thrones simultaneously with its US broadcast.All box sets and complete series will also be available as part of the Sky Go mobile TV offering.Recommendations from Netflix will be displayed on the home page of Sky Q and in the series section of the UI. Netflix content will also be integrated in to Sky Q’s text-based search capability.Sky is selling the new package at a discounted rate of €32.99 with a 24-month contract. Subscribers who wish to upgrade to Netflix Premium, offering 4K UHD and four simultaneous streams, can pay an additional €3, with the option to upgrade or cancel this at any time during the contract period.Marcello Maggioni, Sky Deutschland’s chief commercial officer, said that Sky was working with Netflix to enable customers to “find all their favourite programmes in the same place” with an offering that will enable them “to get their money’s worth more than ever”.Sky made Netflix available on Sky Q boxes in the UK market at the beginning of the month, integrating the streaming offering direct into its TV guide as part of a new Ultimate On Demand package, priced at £10 a month with access to Netflix and Sky box sets. In the UK, Netflix’s 4K option is available as part of the premium Sky Q Experience package.Sky Italia is expected to add Netflix to its Sky Q offering next year.last_img read more

Editors note Doug Casey is known around the worl

first_imgEditor’s note: Doug Casey is known around the world for many very good reasons. Among investors, he’s well known for being a very successful speculator and author. More broadly, his unwavering support of human liberty and his criticism of institutions based on coercion as well as those who support them have made Doug a hero to many… and perhaps public enemy number one to some of those whom he criticizes. Whether one agrees with him or not, Doug almost always has a singular take on issues and ideas, making his essays and talks highly stimulating. As we approach the end of the year – a time when people often reflect on their progress or lack thereof over the past year across all areas of life – this February 2011 interview of Doug Casey by Louis James on the morality of money seems especially trenchant. We hope it helps you reflect on your relationship with money and investing, and brings a renewed sense of clarity and purpose to your financial activities in 2013. Doug Casey on the Morality of Money Interviewed by Casey Research Chief Metals & Mining Investment Strategist Louis James Louis: Doug, every time we have a conversation, I ask you about the investment implications of your ideas, and we consider ways to turn the trends you see into profits. The assumption is that’s what people want to hear from you, since you’re the guru of financial speculation. But this, your known status as a wealthy man, the fact that you have no children, and other things may lead some people to form an incorrect conclusion about you – that “all you care about is money.” So let’s talk about money. Is it all you care about? Doug: I think anyone who has read our conversation giving advice to people just starting out in life (or re-starting) knows that the answer is no. Or the conversation we had in which we discussed Scrooge McDuck, one of the great heroes of literature. However, I have to stop before we start and push back: If money were all I cared about, so what? Would that really make me a bad person? L: I’ve grokked Ayn Rand’s “money speech,” so you know I won’t say yes, but maybe you should expand on that for readers who haven’t absorbed Rand’s ideas… Doug: I’m a huge fan of Rand. She was an original and a genius. But just because someone like her, or me, sees the high moral value of money, that doesn’t mean it’s all-important to us. In fact, I find money less and less important as time goes by, the older I get. Perhaps that’s a function of Maslow’s hierarchy: If you’re hungry, food is all you really care about; if you’re freezing, then it’s warmth; and so forth. If you have enough money, these basics aren’t likely to be problems. My most enjoyable times have had absolutely nothing to do with money. Like a couple times in the past when I hopped freight trains with a friend, once to Portland and once to Sacramento. Each trip took three days and nights, each was full of adventure and weird experiences, and each cost about zero. It was liberating to be out of the money world for a few days. But it was an illusion. Somebody had to get the money to buy the food we ate at missions. Still, it’s nice to live in a dream world for a while. Sure, I’d like more money, if only for the same genetic reason a squirrel wants more nuts to store for the winter. The one common denominator of all living creatures is one word: Survive! And, as a medium of exchange and store of value, money represents survival… it’s much more practical than nuts. L: Some people might say that if money were your highest value, you might become a thief or murderer to get it. Doug: Not likely. I have personal ethics, and there are things I won’t do. Besides, crime – real crime, taking from or harming others, not law-breaking, which is an entirely different thing – is for the lazy, short-sighted, and incompetent. In point of fact, I believe crime doesn’t pay, notwithstanding the fact that Jon Corzine of MF Global is still at large. Criminals are self-destructive. Anyway, what’s the most someone could take, robbing their local bank? Perhaps $10,000? That’s only enough to make a wager with Mitt Romney. But that leads me to think about the subject. In the old days, when Jesse James or other thieves robbed a bank, all the citizens would turn out to engage them in a gun battle in the streets. Why? Because it was actually their money being stored in the bank, not the bankers’ money. A robbed bank had immense personal consequences for everyone in town. Today, nobody gives a damn if a bank is robbed. They’ll get their money back from a US government agency. The bank has become impersonal; most aren’t locally owned. And your deposit has been packaged up into some unfathomable security nobody is responsible for. The whole system has become corrupt. It degrades the very concept of money. This relates to why kids don’t save coins in piggy banks anymore – it’s because they’re no longer coins with value; they’re just tokens that are constantly depreciating and essentially worthless. All of US society is about as sound as the dollar now. Actually, it can be argued that robbing a bank isn’t nearly as serious a crime today as robbing a candy store of $5. Why? Nobody in particular loses in the robbery of today’s socialized banks. But the candy merchant has to absorb the $5 loss personally. Anyway, if you want to rob a bank today, you don’t use a gun. You become part of management and loot the shareholders through outrageous salaries, stock options, and bonuses, among other things. I truly dislike the empty suits that fill most boardrooms today. But most people are mostly honest – it’s the 80/20 rule again. So, no, I think this argument is a straw man. The best way to make money is to create value. If I personally owned Apple as a private company, I’d be making more money – completely honestly – than many governments… and they are the biggest thieves in the world. L: No argument. Doug: Notice one more thing: making money honestly means creating something other people value, not necessarily what you value. The more money I want, the more I have to think about what other people want, and find better, faster, cheaper ways of delivering it to them. The reason someone is poor – and, yes, I know all the excuses for poverty – is that the poor do not produce more than they consume. Or if they do, they don’t save the surplus. L: The productive make things other people want: Adam Smith’s invisible hand. Doug: Exactly. Selfishness, in the form of the profit motive, guides people to serve the needs of others far more reliably, effectively, and efficiently than any amount of haranguing from priests, poets, or politicians. Those people tend to be profoundly anti-human, actually. L: People say money makes the world go around, and they are right. Or as I tell my students, there are two basic ways to motivate and coordinate human behavior on a large scale: coercion and persuasion. Government is the human institution based on coercion. The market is the one based on persuasion. Individuals can sometimes persuade others to do things for love, charity, or other reasons, but to coordinate voluntary cooperation society-wide, you need the price system of a profit-driven market economy. Doug: And that’s why it doesn’t matter how smart or well-intended politicians may be. Political solutions are always detrimental to society over the long run, because they are based on coercion. If governments lacked the power to compel obedience, they would cease to be governments. No matter how liberal, there’s always a point at which it comes down to force – especially if anyone tries to opt out and live by their own rules. Even if people try that in the most peaceful and harmonious way with regard to their neighbors, the state cannot allow separatists to secede. The moment the state grants that right, every different religious, political, social, or even artistic group might move to form its own enclave, and the state disintegrates. That’s wonderful – for everybody but the parasites who rely on the state (which is why secession movements always become violent). I’m actually mystified at why most people not only just tolerate the state but seem to love it. They’re enthusiastic about it. Sometimes that makes me pessimistic about the future… L: Reminds me of the conversation we had on Europe disintegrating. But let’s stay on topic. So you’re saying that money is a positive moral good in society because the pursuit of it motivates the creation of value. It’s the bridge between selfishness and social good, and it’s the basis for voluntary cooperation, rather than coerced interaction. Anything else? Doug: Yes, but first, let me say one more thing about the issue of selfishness – the virtue of selfishness – and the vice of altruism. Ayn Rand might never forgive me for saying this, but if you take the two concepts – ethical self-interest and concern for others – to their logical conclusions, they are actually the same. It’s in your selfish best interest to provide the maximum amount of value to the maximum number of people – that’s how Apple became the giant company it is. Conversely, it is not altruistic to help other people. I want all the people around me to be strong and successful. It makes life better and easier for me if they’re all doing well. So it’s selfish, not altruistic, when I help them. To weaken others, to degrade them by making them dependent upon generosity, as we discussed in our conversation on charity, is not doing those people any good. If you really care about others, the best thing you can do for them is to push for totally freeing all markets. That makes it both necessary and rewarding for them to learn valuable skills and to become creators of value and not burdens on society. It’s a win-win all around. L: That’ll bend some people’s minds… So, what was the other thing? Doug: Well, referring again to our conversation on charity, the accumulation of wealth is in and of itself an important social as well as a personal good. L: Remind us. Doug: The good to individuals of accumulating wealth is obvious, but the social good often goes unrecognized. Put simply, progress requires capital. Major new undertakings, from hydropower dams to spaceships, to new medical devices and treatments, require huge amounts of capital. If you’re not willing to extract that capital from the population via the coercion of taxes, i.e., steal it, you need wealth to accumulate in private hands to pay for these things. In other words, if the world is going to improve, we need huge pools of capital, intelligently invested. We need as many “obscenely” rich people as possible. L: Right then… so, money is all good – nothing bad about it at all? Doug: Unfortunately, many of the rich people in the world today didn’t get their money by real production. They got it by using political connections and slopping at the trough of the state. That’s bad. When I look at how some people have gotten their money – Clinton, Pelosi, and all the politically connected bankers and brokers, just for a start – I can understand why the poor want to eat the rich. But money itself isn’t the problem. Money is just a store of value and a means of exchange. What is bad about that? Gold, as we’ve discussed many times, happens to be the best form of money the market has ever produced: It’s convenient, consistent, durable, divisible, has intrinsic value (it’s the second-most reflective and conductive metal, the most nonreactive, the most ductile, and the most malleable of all metals), and can’t be created out of thin air. Those are gold’s attributes. People attribute all sorts of other silly things to gold, and poetic critics talk about the evils of the lust for gold. But it’s not the gold itself that’s evil – it’s the psychological aberrations and weaknesses of unethical people that are the problem. The critics are fixating on what is merely a tool, rather than the ethical merits or failures of the people who use the tool and are responsible for the consequences of their actions. L: Sort of like the people who repeat foolish slogans like “guns kill” – as though guns sprout little feet when no one is looking and run around shooting people all by themselves. Doug: Exactly. They’re the same personality type – busybodies who want to enforce their opinions on everyone else. They’re dangerous and despicable. Yet they somehow posture as if they had the high moral ground. L: OK, so even if you cared only for money, that could be seen as a good thing. But you do care for more – like what? Doug: Well, money is a tool – the means to achieve various goals. For me, those goals include fine art, wine, cars, homes, horses, cigars, and many other physical things. But it also gives me the ability to do things I enjoy or value – like spend time with friends, go to the gym, lie in the sun, read books, and do pretty much what I want when I want. Let’s just call it as philosophers do: “the good life.” It’s why my partners and I built La Estancia de Cafayate [in Argentina]. We have regular events down there I welcome readers to attend. But I don’t take money too seriously. It’s just something you have. It’s much less important than what you do, and trivial in comparison to what you are. I could be happy being a hobo. As I said in the conversation on fresh starts, there have been times when I felt my life was just as good and I was just as happy without much money at all. That said, you can’t be too rich or too thin. L: Very good. Investment implications? Doug: This may all seem rather philosophical, but it’s actually extremely important to investors. What is the purpose of investing or speculating? To make money. How can anyone hope to do that well if they feel that there is something immoral or distasteful about making money? Someone who pinches his or her nose and tries anyway because making money is a necessary evil will never do as well as those who throw themselves into the fray with gusto and delight in doing something valuable – and doing it well. L: The law of attraction. Doug: Yes, but I don’t view the law of attraction as a metaphysical force – rather as a psychological reality. If you have a negative attitude about something, you’re unlikely to attract it… even if you try to talk yourself into thinking the opposite. L: OK, but that’s not a stock pick… Doug: Sure. We’re talking basics here. No stock picks today, just a Public Service Announcement: If you think money is evil, don’t bother trying to accumulate wealth. On the other hand, if you want to become wealthy, you’d better think long and hard about your attitudes about money, work through the thoughts above and those you can find in the rest of our conversations… Cultivate a positive attitude about money, which is right up there with language as one of the most valuable tools man has ever invented. Think about it, and give yourself permission to become rich. It’s a good thing. L: Very well. Thanks for what I hope will prove to be a very thought-provoking conversation! Doug: My pleasure. Talk to you next week. A successful investing strategy requires much more than choosing the right stocks: it requires an understanding of cultural, political, and economic trends as well as being able to analyze a sector and the companies in it. Doug Casey’s decades of successful speculation show that he’s “the real deal” – and now you can have deeper access into his mind, in one convenient location. Doug has recently written a book, Totally Incorrect, which offers his thoughts and investment implications on topics as wide-ranging as NASA, paying taxes, ethics, why college education is a waste of resources, the immorality of voting, and much more. It’s available as an e-book as well as in physical format – get all the details here.last_img read more

Dan Steinhart Managing Editor of The Casey Report

first_img Dan Steinhart Managing Editor of The Casey Report Latin American Equities: Down but Not Out By Claudio Maulhardt, World Money Analyst Not so long ago, Latin American equities were a market darling. Then, the markets viewed signs of an economic recovery in the developed world as good news for Latin American stocks (higher EPS prospects), but signs of stagnation were also considered good news (as a lower discount rate would apply). Now, the majority of Latin American stock markets have begun to trade as if the opposite were true. With the sole exception of Mexico, whose stock market has traditionally traded closer to the S&P 500, the rest of Latin equities have lost their glow. Latin stocks have registered a seventh consecutive month of investor outflows, and it does not look like the trend is going to reverse any time soon. The change from hype to doubt is clearly reflected in the chart below. Latin equities were, incredibly, considered a safe haven after the 2008 financial crisis. From the end of 2008 to the end of 2010, Latin stocks outperformed the S&P 500 by an impressive 90%. Since then, the love affair has come to an end, and Latin equities have underperformed by more than 67%. Enjoy, and see you next week. How to Play the New Scenario So the trend is not the friend of Latin American equity investors. Is it best to shun them for the time being? It’s not that simple. Latin equities were an easy trade for many years. The fad lifted all boats regardless of their individual merits, which made trading the indices or the associated ETFs the way to go. Now, it’s not hard to see that the correction has been exacerbated by the unwinding of the macro trade. Over the last decade, the weight of Latin American equities in the MSCI World Index has doubled, surging from roughly 2% to 4.4%. The MSCI Emerging Markets Latin American Index has a US$1.5 trillion market cap, which makes simply neglecting it a tough decision for index fund managers. The problem is that it is hard to trade Latin American equities as if they were a single asset class. Trading ETFs or indices may mean that good opportunities are missed. An index is comprised of a wide array of stocks whose issuers will not necessarily perform similarly in various economic environments. Appreciating currencies and the wide availability of credit in the last decade has meant that stocks most closely linked to domestic consumption were the winners by far. The new picture of weaker currencies and tougher credit conditions means that the winners of the past may not fare as well in the future. A New Approach The next winning theme will be foreign-currency earners (mainly exporters) and, more important, stocks with little or no debt held in a foreign currency—and especially with no debt in foreign currency if it has no foreign currency income to match the servicing of that debt. Those are the characteristics you want to look for in a solid Latin American investment. It’s hard to believe that the cycle of weaker currencies, weaker current accounts, and weaker EPS growth is about to reach its end in the near future. However, this is not the end of the Latin American investment theme; it only means that the approach must change. There are companies whose business profiles will help them thrive in what may otherwise look like a generally challenging scenario for Latin American stocks. Going with the flow may prevent investors from grabbing the opportunity that these stocks offer. Given that I’m still neck-deep in assembling the October issue of The Casey Report—which covers such topics as Doug Casey’s take on the government shutdown, a hunt for emerging market opportunities, and how to construct a bulletproof portfolio—I’ll keep today’s lead-in short and sweet. This week’s article comes to us from Claudio Maulhardt, fund manager and partner at Buenos Aires-based Copernico Capital Partners, a hedge fund group that focuses on Latin American equities. Latin American stocks have taken a beating along with all emerging markets recently. Yesteryear, you could make money in Latin America by simply buying and holding a broad index and letting the rising tide do its thing. That strategy doesn’t work anymore. Instead, as Claudio will explain, you must target individual companies with specific qualities that will help them rise above lackluster market performance. He concludes with a checklist of sorts that will help you separate the right companies from the wrong ones. This article originally appeared in World Money Analyst, Mauldin Economics’ publication that features a team of globally distributed investment analysts who scour the international markets, looking for investment opportunities outside of the US. If you find Claudio’s analysis useful, you’ll probably also enjoy this free report just published by the World Money Analyst team: The Trends in Global markets and Why You Need a Foreign Broker. Click here to access it. This change in the tide may be linked to Wall Street’s permanent belief in “next year’s” US growth, a story investors seem to like despite the lack of strong empirical support. However, the main catalyst has undoubtedly been the weakness in China’s economic growth and, most important, the shift in China’s economic model from investment-driven to consumption-driven growth. There is a direct link between this “remodeling” and the string of monthly outflows that dedicated Latin American fund managers have experienced. The math is simple: Lower Chinese investment means less demand for industrial commodities, which are produced in Latin America by some of the largest companies in the region, which make up a significant part of the country and regional indices. The consensus of economists surveyed by Bloomberg was for all Latin American countries to have weaker current account balances in 2013 than in 2012. With interest rates rising and Wall Street expecting them to rise further as the US economy grows, financing the gap may become tougher for Latin economies. This brings in the linkage to exchange rates, which constitute a not insignificant portion of Latin American equities’ underperformance. Exchange rates helped EPS, book values, and leverage ratios look great in US dollar terms for many years. Now that the US dollar has strengthened against Latin American currencies, the opposite trend is under way.last_img read more

New York Universitys School of Medicine is learni

first_imgNew York University’s School of Medicine is learning that no good deed goes unpunished.The highly ranked medical school announced with much fanfare this month that it is raising $600 million from private donors to eliminate tuition for all its students — even providing refunds to those currently enrolled. Before the announcement, annual tuition at the school was $55,018.NYU leaders hope the move will help address the increasing problem of student debt among young doctors, which many educators argue pushes students to enter higher-paying specialties instead of primary care, and deters some from becoming doctors in the first place.”A population as diverse as ours is best served by doctors from all walks of life, we believe, and aspiring physicians and surgeons should not be prevented from pursuing a career in medicine because of the prospect of overwhelming financial debt,” Dr. Robert Grossman, the dean of the medical school and CEO of NYU Langone Health, said in a statement released by the university. NYU declined a request to elaborate further on its plans.The announcement generated headlines and cheers from students. But not everyone thinks waiving tuition for all med students, including those who can afford to pay, is the best way to approach the complicated issue of student debt.”As I start rank-ordering the various charities I want to give to, the people who can pay for medical school in cash aren’t at the top of my list,” says Craig Garthwaite, a health economist at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management.”If you had to find some cause to put tons of money behind, this strikes me as an odd one,” says Dr. Aaron Carroll, a pediatrician and researcher at Indiana University.Still, medical education debt is a big issue in health care. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, which represents U.S. medical schools and academic health centers, 75 percent of graduating physicians in 2017 had student loan debt as they launched their careers, with a median tally of $192,000. Nearly half owed more than $200,000.But it is less clear how much of an impact that debt has on students’ choice of medical specialty. The AAMC’s data suggest debt does not play as big a role in specialty selection as some analysts claim.If debt were a huge factor, one would expect that doctors who owed the most would choose the highest-paying specialties. However, that’s not the case.”Debt doesn’t vary much across the specialties,” says Julie Fresne, AAMC’s director of student financial services and debt management.Garthwaite agrees. He says surveys in which young doctors claim debt as a reason for choosing a more lucrative specialty should be viewed with suspicion.”No one [who chooses a higher-paying job] says they did it because they want two Teslas,” he says. “They say they have all this debt.”Carroll questions how much difference even $200,000 in student debt makes to people who, at the lowest end of the medical spectrum, still stand to make six figures a year. “Doctors in general do just fine,” he says. “The idea we should pity physicians or worry about them strikes me as odd.”Choice of specialty is also influenced by more than money. Some specialties may bring less demanding lifestyles than primary care, or more prestige. Carroll says when he opted for pediatrics, his surgeon father was not impressed, calling it a “garbageman” specialty.There is also an array of government programs that help students afford medical school or that forgive student loans, although usually such programs require the new doctors to serve several years either in the military or in a medically underserved location. The federal National Health Service Corps, for example, provides scholarships and loan repayments to medical professionals who agree to work in mostly rural or inner-city areas that have a shortage of health care providers. And the Department of Education oversees the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, which cancels outstanding loan balances after 10 years for those who work for nonprofit employers.Medical schools themselves are addressing the student debt problem. Many — including NYU — have created programs that let students finish medical school in three years rather than four — reducing the cost by 25 percent. And the Cleveland Clinic, together with Case Western Reserve University, has a tuition-free medical school program aimed at training future medical researchers. It takes five years, but grants graduates with both a doctor of medicine title and a special research credential or master’s degree.This latest move by NYU, however, is part of a continuing race among top-tier medical schools to attract the best students — and possibly improve a school’s national rankings.In 2014, UCLA announced it would provide merit-based scholarships covering the entire cost of medical education (including not just tuition, but also living expenses) to 20 percent of its students. Columbia University announced a similar plan earlier this year, although unlike NYU and UCLA, Columbia’s program is based on a student’s financial need.These programs are funded, in whole or in part, by large donors whose names brand each medical school — entertainment mogul David Geffen at UCLA, former Merck CEO P. Roy Vagelos at Columbia, and Home Depot’s co-founder, Kenneth Langone, at NYU.Economist Garthwaite says it is all well and good if top medical schools want to compete for top students by offering discounts. But if their goal is to encourage more students to enter primary care or to steer more people from lower-income families into medicine, waiving everyone’s tuition “is not the most target-efficient way to reach that goal.”Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service, is an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, and is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Copyright 2018 Kaiser Health News. To see more, visit Kaiser Health News.last_img read more

The number of disabled people who are unemployed h

first_imgThe number of disabled people who are unemployed has risen for the second quarter in a row, according to new government figures.The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) used the publication of quarterly labour market statistics to point to the growth of 225, 000 in the number of disabled people in work, compared with the same period last year.But DWP failed to point out that the number of unemployed disabled people had also risen, from 399,000 in October to December 2014, to 401,000 the following quarter, and now to 423,000 in April to June 2015.The Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures also show a large rise in the last quarter in the number of sick and disabled people described as “economically inactive” – those not in work and neither seeking nor available to work – from 3,313,000 to 3,399,000, an increase of 2.6 per cent in just three months.One important factor pointed out by disabled activist Caroline Richardson, from the Spartacus online campaigning network, was that the ONS definition of employment includes those on unpaid work experience, as well as government-supported training and employment programmes.Richardson said: “Whilst there is a clear increase in the number of ill and disabled people working part-time since 1997, those in full-time employment is harder to identify.“The actual criteria for being counted as sick and disabled, and its impact on work, is now in line with the core definition of the 2010 Equality Act, and is for the purpose of data collection, self-reporting. The ONS is clear that the figures are therefore estimates.“To muddy the waters further, the definition of work has also been extended to include work experience and work-related training. “There does appear to be an increase in sick and disabled people moving into some type of work, but further analysis may show the work to be part-time, temporary or to be government-related training programmes.”The ONS said there were 2.08 million people who were not looking for work due to long-term sickness for April to June 2015, 75,000 more than for January to March 2015 and 86,000 more than the same period in 2014.For April to June 2015, there were 8.99 million people aged from 16 to 64 who were economically inactive.An ONS spokesman said it was not unusual for the number of people in employment and unemployment to rise at the same time, which could happen if large numbers of people moved into the labour market but did not secure jobs.But he said there was “no wider context we’re aware of for the effect you’ve noted”.He also stressed that the figures relating to disabled people had not been seasonally adjusted, so it was more difficult to see whether there were genuine trends.last_img read more

Its Easier Than Ever to Not Compensate Interns But Theres a Catch

first_img Add to Queue Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Career and Workplace Expert; Founder and President, Come Recommended The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) recently updated its unpaid internship guidelines, and that’s good news for employers. The reason: Under the DOL’s former guidelines, if even one of the six factors it listed wasn’t met, interns were entitled to compensation.Related: 5 Ways Your Small Business Will Benefit From Hiring InternsBut, that’s changed: Now, companies are expected to meet a single central standard (determined by seven factors) to clarify who is the “primary beneficiary” in an unpaid intern-employer relationship. That primary beneficiary, of course, must be the intern.Among those factors are that both parties must understand there is no expectation of compensation or a job offer. And, the company hiring the intern must provide educational training and align that training with the intern’s formal education program and academic calendar.  Regardless of this newer, easier standard, however, unpaid internships remain a complicated subject. John S. Ho, partner and chair of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration practice at law firm Cozen O’Connor’s New York City office, explained just how complicated, saying that, “The analysis [of the primary beneficiary] depends on the unique circumstances of each case, giving businesses more flexibility to make their case that an intern is properly classified based on individual facts.”Here’s how the guidelines have changed and what these changes mean for employers:Both parties can now benefit.The old standard required that employers derive no benefit from the internship. Of course, some unscrupulous employers managed to squeeze valuable, unpaid labor out of their interns.But for the honest ones, the unrealistic former “no benefit” requirement tied companies’ hands and limited the experience that unpaid interns could receive.The new, seven-factor test, however, is more flexible. It allows employers to benefit from the intern’s activities as long as that young person remains the primary beneficiary of the relationship. For that to occur, employers must make sure they:Provide educational, hands-on training.Accommodate the intern’s academic commitments.Complement the work of their paid employees rather than displace them.Conclude the internship once the intern has learned all that he or she can from the experience.Overall, the employer should provide educational experience that meets specific learning objectives set prior to the internship’s start. Providing the intern descriptive materials akin to a university-style curriculum and syllabus might be helpful to ensure that “educational experience.”Related: Stop Delegating Social Media to Your InternsIn addition,employers should meet with their interns reguarly to discuss their progress, ideas and goals. That way, they can provide a more personalized and educational internship experience.   The experience must be good — but not too good.While reviewing a client’s internship program, Joey Price, founder and owner of Jumpstart:HR, LLC, an HR outsourcing and consulting firm in Baltimore, heard multiple negative reviews from interns.The company the interns had gone to work for made sure the interns received daily lunches, solid work experiences and materials. But, the interns’ lack of payment still prevented the program from being a success. The reason was the work’s revenue-generating nature.“I advised my client that any time an ‘intern’ . . . is focused primarily on revenue-generating activity, it is no longer an internship,” Price explained. In essence, the client was teaching interns how to trade, giving them funds to manage and then monitoring the progress of those trades. And this went against the idea of complementing, rather than displacing, the work of paid employees — one of the seven factors in the new unpaid internship guidelines.So, while an intern’s experience with a company should be good, it shouldn’t be so good that it takes the place of paid employees’ work. And that means focusing on the educational aspect of the internship above all else.To do this, Ryan Glasgow, a labor and employment partner at the law firm Hunton & Williams LLP in its Richmond, Va., office, suggested the need to connect internships with college educational programs and the college or university’s system for offering academic credit.Glasgow also said he finds it important for internships to go beyond the work experience offered in the typical office. This could mean adding in classes and educational programs, Glasgow said, so that students receive training in a university-like environment.The DOL internship guidelines aren’t mandatory, but they demand your respect, nonetheless.Because the DOL is not a legislative body, the primary beneficiary intern test it provides is merely a guideline for unpaid internship programs. If there is a grievance, no judge will arbitrate.Despite that fact, said Dan Kalish, the managing partner at law firm HKM Employment Attorneys LLP’s office in Seattle, Wash., leaders should still proceed with caution. “Even if an employer meets the federal test to have an unpaid internship, it is possible that the employer will not meet the state law requirements to have an unpaid internship; and the employer would have to pay the intern in accordance with the state law,” Kalish told me by email.Related: Paying Interns Is a Good Investment In the Future of Your Business To keep small companies safe and both parties happy, therefore, consult an employment lawyer if you have any doubts about your internship program. Then, go out and create a program that will be an unforgettable experience for those students lucky enough to be accepted to it. Image credit: Shutterstock Internships Next Article Contributor 5 min read Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. The days of interns’ long hours and endless coffee runs are hopefully ending, thanks to new federal guidelines. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Heather R. Huhman February 1, 2018 It’s Easier Than Ever to Not Compensate Interns, But There’s a Catch. –shares Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

Yes to yoghurt and cheese New improved Mediterranean diet

first_imgImage Credit: Rimma Bondarenko / Shutterstock Dec 11 2018Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Thousands of Australians can take heart as new research from the University of South Australia shows a dairy-enhanced Mediterranean diet will significantly increase health outcomes for those at risk of cardiovascular disease – and it’s even more effective than a low-fat diet. Cardiovascular disease is the single leading cause of death in Australia, affecting 4.2 million Australians and killing one Australian every 12 minutes. Low-fat diets are often recommended as suitable food plans for those seeking to reduce their risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Similarly, the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) has been shown to deliver significant health benefits.In this UniSA study, published by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers compared the health benefits of a MedDiet supplemented with two to three serves of dairy each day, and a generic low-fat diet.The results show that the dairy-supplemented MedDiet (MedDairy) significantly improved blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterol, mood and cognitive function.PhD candidate Alexandra Wade says the new MedDairy diet challenges popular perceptions of what is considered healthy.“The MedDiet is fast earning a reputation as the world’s healthiest diet and is renowned for delivering improved cardiovascular and cognitive health,” Wade says.“But it’s also higher in fat, which can be a deterrent for people seeking to adopt a healthier eating plan, especially if they don’t realise the difference between healthy and unhealthy fats.“In Australia, low-fat diets are often recommended for improving heart health and they are still perceived as being healthy.“This study shows that the new MedDairy works better than a generic low-fat diet, ensuring better health outcomes for people at risk of cardiovascular disease.”Related StoriesScientists examine hormonal links between diet and obesityLow-carb diet may reverse metabolic syndrome independent of weight lossDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesImportantly, the MedDairy diet also meets additional calcium requirements recommended by Australia’s national health bodies.A typical MedDiet includes extra virgin olive oil, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, wholegrain breads, pastas and cereals, moderate consumption of fish and red wine, and low consumption of red meat, sweet and processed foods. It also includes 1-2 servings of dairy foods (700-820mg calcium), which is less than half the dairy recommended by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) for older Australians.“Living in Australia, we have different dietary requirements, notably a need for more calcium to protect against osteoporosis,” Wade says.“These needs are unmet in the traditional MedDiet, which makes it difficult for people to adopt in the long term.“This study delivers healthier options for Australians by tailoring the nutrients in the MedDiet to meet the needs of a non-Mediterranean population.“In Australia, women up to age 50 years – and men up to age 70 years – should consume 1000mg per day of calcium per day and 1300mg thereafter, which is roughly between 3.5 and 4.5 serves a day.“The new MedDairy diet allows for three to four servings with dairy, which means Australians can more sustainably meet their recommended daily nutrient intakes while also maintaining the significant health benefits offered through the MedDiet.“When it comes down to it, people want to be able to enjoy a colourful, tasty and nutritious diet. And if you’re one of the thousands of people seeking to improve your cardiovascular and cognitive health – look no further than the MedDairy diet.”Notes Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death in Australia, with 43,477 deaths attributed to CVD in Australia in 2017. CVD kills one Australian every 12 minutes. Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics 2018, Causes of Death 2017, ABS cat. no. 3303.0, September. Cardiovascular disease affects one in six Australians or 4.2 million people. Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016, National Health Survey: First results, 2014-15, ABS cat. no. 4364.0.55.001, March. Data customised using TableBuilder. Source: https://www.unisa.edu.aulast_img read more

Cheng preparing hubby for a comeback

first_img Related News Asean+ 16 May 2019 Sammi Cheng seen in public for first time after Andy Hui was caught kissing Jacqueline Wong Related News Found in Translation Asean+ 19 Apr 2019 Sammi Cheng breaks silence as she forgives husband Andy Hui Compiled by C. ARUNO and CLARISSA CHUNG CANTOPOP queen Sammi Cheng is said to be preparing husband Andy Hui for a comeback this month after his career stalled due to a cheating scandal, China Press reported.Citing a weekly magazine in Hong Kong, it quoted Hui, 52, as saying that Cheng was “no longer angry with me”.Hui was photographed jogging with his good friend Edmund Leung, who is also a singer.center_img Tags / Keywords: Asean+ 01 May 2019 Andy Hui scandal: Does post by Sammi Cheng mean he is no longer in the doghouse? {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} A source close to the couple revealed that Hui, who would be appearing as a special guest in all 13 of Cheng’s concerts beginning yesterday, was also preparing himself for a return to the industry. A few weeks ago, Cheng, 46, uploaded a photo of herself exercising at a gym, which also had Hui’s reflection on a mirror. The same source told the magazine that it was an attempt by Cheng to gauge if fans had actually forgiven Hui. “It is common knowledge that Sammi is really worried about Andy. She wants everyone to accept him. “Such a good wife is hard to find,” the source said.Cheng had made repeated postings on Instagram, stating that she had forgiven her husband, and urged fans to respect her decision.In April, Hui was caught canoodling with 30-year-old actress Jacqueline Wong in the back of a taxi. The footage went viral online, prompting both artistes to make a public apology and take a hiatus from work.> A confused first-time flyer ended up climbing onto a baggage carousel at Turkey’s Ankara Esenboga Airport, thinking that was how she was supposed to board the flight, the same daily reported.CCTV camera footage showed the woman clambering onto the carousel from the check-in counter before losing her balance and falling face down on the machine.Shocked airport staff managed to stop the carousel before the woman was transported into the baggage sorting area.The woman later admitted that it was her first flight and she thought that was how both baggage and passengers were loaded onto the plane.> Oriental Daily reported about consumers complaining that paper straws were a poor substitute for plastic straws, which had been banned by the Selangor government. Consumers complained that paper straws tended to peel off and turn soggy. Since the ban started on July 1, many food and beverage outlets in the state had begun to replace these with paper straws to the disappointment of customers.“In the beginning, there was not much difference between plastic and paper straws. “But after a while, the liquid seeps into the straw and the mouth-feel changes,” said a woman, who only wanted to be known by her surname Xu.Xu added that she preferred to bring along her own metal straw because her drinks tended to end up with bits and pieces of paper in it. In an experiment, the daily obtained paper straws from various eateries and put them in both hot and cold drinks, and found that after 15 minutes, the straws would turn soggy. After 30 minutes, they would start to disintegrate.The above articles are compiled from the vernacular newspapers (Bahasa Malaysia, Chinese and Tamil dailies). As such, stories are grouped according to the respective language/medium. Where a paragraph begins with a >, it denotes a separate news item.last_img read more