N’Golo Kante manages just 25 minutes in Chelsea’s final training session before Europa League final

first_imgN’Golo Kante manages just 25 minutes in Chelsea’s final training session before Europa League final Sean KearnsTuesday 28 May 2019 7:27 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link391Shares Advertisement Kante did not participate in the main training session (Picture: Getty)‘I think it’s 50-50 at the moment. 50-50. Yesterday, 60-40 for ‘no’. Today 50-50. He was a little bit better this morning. But 50-50,’ said Sarri.AdvertisementAdvertisementHowever, Sarri was speaking before the club’s final training session and Kante’s omission from the main group makes him a major doubt for the final.Kante warmed up by himself before taking part in some of the session with the rest of his team-mates.However, after just 25 minutes Kante headed down the tunnel with fitness coach Paolo Bertelli and did not come back out to feature in the remainder of the session.Should Kante fail to prove his fitness, Sarri is likely to pick a midfield three of Ross Barkley, Mateo Kovacic and Jorginho.MORE: Manchester United should sign Harry Maguire, says Teddy Sheringham N’Golo Kante is a major doubt for the Europa League final (Picture: Getty)Chelsea star N’Golo Kante is a major doubt for Wednesday’s Europa League final against Arsenal after managing just 25 minutes of the club’s final warm-up session.The Frenchman has been struggling with a hamstring injury for the last month and was initially ruled out of the game.However, he was an unexpected traveller on the flight to Baku and that inclusion raised hopes with Chelsea fans that the midfielder would be fit.Speaking on Wednesday Maurizio Sarri revealed that Kante was ’50/50′ to be fit and the Italian admitted the midfielder’s chances had improved from the day before.ADVERTISEMENT Advertisement Commentlast_img read more

Evolution Fits Any Data

first_imgAt first blush, it might seem a wonderful thing when many different kinds of evidence can be explained by one simple, elegant theory.  Actually, though, too much confirmation can be a theory’s downfall.  When a theory explains too much – even opposite things – it really explains nothing.  For instance, everything in the universe can be explained by the phrase, “Stuff happens.”  Such a theory is useless, even if true.  That’s why any theory that explains too much should be looked at askance.  Here are some recent observations offered in support of the theory of evolution: Antibiotic resistance:  Evolutionists debating creationists have pointed to the evolution of antibiotic resistance as an example of evolution occurring right before our eyes.  The idea is that bacteria never encountered modern antibiotics till they were synthesized in the early 20th century, so they must have quickly adapted by natural selection to the new environmental challenge.  A paper in Nature just showed, however, that resistance to antibiotics is ancient.1  Canadian researchers sequenced DNA from permafrost said to be 30,000 years old, and found genes for four kinds of antiobiotic resistance already there; in fact, the gene to resist vancomycin was present, and looked similar to modern variants. The discovery of antibiotics more than 70 years ago initiated a period of drug innovation and implementation in human and animal health and agriculture. These discoveries were tempered in all cases by the emergence of resistant microbes. This history has been interpreted to mean that antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a modern phenomenon; this view is reinforced by the fact that collections of microbes that predate the antibiotic era are highly susceptible to antibiotics…. This work firmly establishes that antibiotic resistance genes predate our use of antibiotics and offers the first direct evidence that antibiotic resistance is an ancient, naturally occurring phenomenon widespread in the environment. This is consistent with the rapid emergence of resistance in the clinic and predicts that new antibiotics will select for pre-existing resistance determinants that have been circulating within the microbial pangenome for millennia. Rather than falsifying a key argument for evolution, though, this has been taken as further confirmation of it.  “These results show conclusively that antibiotic resistance is a natural phenomenon,” the authors said, “that predates the modern selective pressure of clinical antibiotic use.”  It just puts the “selective pressure” in the past instead of under our eyes. Endless variation most beautiful:  The lab plant Arabidopsis thaliana (water cress) has been scrutinized every which way.  Now there are genomes for dozens of varieties.  Michael Bevan wrote for Nature about what geneticists are learning from comparative genomics.2  He began, Charles Darwin wrote of the “endless forms most beautiful” of species that have arisen from natural selection. But his words also apply to the genetic variation within species such as the highly adaptable plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Fig. 1). The first analyses of the sequences of multiple genomes of A. thaliana, including one on page 419 of this issue by Gan et al., have now been published. These studies provide a foundation for identifying the factors that shape genome change, and for mapping genome-sequence variation among a wide range of A. thaliana varieties that represents the plant’s diversity. But while Bevan and Gan et al.3 welcomed the new information on genetic diversity of this plant, they did not entertain thoughts that the variability could have been designed (i.e., for pre-programmed adaptability), nor did they consider the question of why, after presumably millions of years of variation, these plants are still members of a single species.  How appropriate, therefore, was it for Bevan to apply Darwin’s line to the phenomenon? Time dilation:  Researchers proudly announced a new robust Tree of Life for mammals.  The report in PhysOrg shows Mark Springer (UC Riverside) smiling happily beside his computer screen.  With teammates from Texas A&M, Springer got the fossils and the genetics to match in what had been a problematic phylogeny.  “This is the first time this kind of dataset has been put together for mammals,” Springer boasted.  In the body of the article, however, was this curious admission: To date divergence times on their phylogeny of mammalian families, Springer and colleagues used a “relaxed molecular clock.” This kind of molecular clock allows for the use of multiple rates of evolution instead of using one rate of evolution that governs all branches of the Tree of Life. They also used age estimates for numerous fossil mammals to calibrate their time tree. But if the calibration is applied to a relaxed clock, it would seem that this is an exercise in circular reasoning: using evolutionarily-assumed estimates for fossil dates to stretch or compress the dates for evolutionarily-assumed ancestral lines.  Visions of Salvador Dali’s The Persistence of Memory come to mind. Fluctuating climate:  As the old joke goes, if you don’t like the weather in [name your city], wait five minutes.”  This can be expanded in evolutionary time to, “If you can’t evolve in your local climate, wait a million years.”  Sure enough, PhysOrg announced to readers, “Climatic fluctuations drove key events in human evolution.”  To support this idea, a notion was introduced called variability selection.  “Variability selection suggests that evolution, when faced with rapid climatic fluctuation, should respond to the range of habitats encountered rather than to each individual habitat in turn; the timeline of variability selection established by Dr. [Matt] Grove [U of Liverpool] suggests that Homo erectus could be a product of exactly this process.”  That’s because, he explains, Homo erectus was a “generalist,” something like a jack of all climates.  Other putative ancestors apparently took the latter option of the slogan, “evolve or perish.”  While suggesting things, Grove also suggested that recent global warming may outrun humans’ ability to evolve.  That shouldn’t be a problem, though; maybe “relaxed molecular clocks” (see previous item) could be applied to match evolution up with “variability selection.” Forward, backward, or lateral pass:  Another article on PhysOrg exclaims, “Fluid equilibrium in prehistoric organisms sheds light on a turning point in evolution.”  Since “Maintaining fluid balance in the body is essential to survival, from the tiniest protozoa to the mightiest of mammals,” evolution was faced with a crossroads.  In the new tale, “Swiss researchers have found genetic evidence that links this intricate process to a turning point in evolution.”  Old cells couldn’t pump sodium out of their membranes effectively.  This put them behind an evolutionary roadblock.  Bernard Rossier (U of Lausanne) figured out how they broke through: a certain subunit of a gene for pumping sodium “appeared” and the rest was history: “the team found that the beta subunit appeared slightly before the emergence of Metazoans (multicellular animals with differentiated tissues) roughly 750 million years ago.”  Rossier couldn’t quite figure out when the emergence appeared: Dr. Rossier said that although it is possible that the genes for ENaC originated in the common ancestor of eukaryotes and were lost in all branches except the Metazoa and the Excavates, there is another possibility. There could have been a lateral transfer of genes between N. gruberi and a Metazoan ancestor, one that lived between the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes and the first Metazoans. Either way, evolution explains it, and evolution wins.  With this vital piece of their machinery now in place, the first eukaryotic cells that emerged could pump their sodium, maintain fluid balance, and diversify.  Giraffes and redwoods could not be far behind; after all, what’s a few more million years?  That’s plenty of evolutionary time for things to emerge and appear. Under the sea:  According to PhysOrg, evolutionary detectives are getting warmer. Their goal is to explain a profound mystery: About 3.8 billion years ago, Earth was teeming with unicellular life. A little more than 4.5 billion years ago, the Earth was a ball of vaporous rock. And somewhere in between, the first organisms spontaneously arose.  Pinpointing exactly when and how that shift happened has proven a difficult bit of interdisciplinary detective work. A team of Stanford geologists hasn’t quite solved the problem, but they’ve come closer. By examining the geology and environment of the early Earth, the researchers demonstrate the plausibility of one theory: that life originated above serpentinite rock on the ocean bottom. Because the necessary conditions only existed for a few million years, the findings provide a potential timestamp for the appearance of the Earth’s first organism. Whether or not this represents scientific progress, though, is an interesting question.  Their scenario relies heavily on imagination: “Serpentinite was likely present when life arose,” the body text states further down.  “Unfortunately, the geological record only reliably goes back approximately 3.8 billion years, making a definitive statement impossible.”  (This calls into question the above claim that the scientists examined the geology and environment of the early Earth.) Their scenario relies on acid gradients providing an energy source for any organisms waiting in the wings to appear on stage.  “This leaves a relatively brief window for the origin of life, at least by this mechanism,” one researcher said.  The article ended, “Smoking-gun evidence in support of the origin-of-life theory remains hard to come by.”  To top it off, a researcher gave his opinion of this scientific theory founded on imagination: “It’s conceivable that a biologist might get lucky, but I’m not holding my breath.” In spite of this questionable display of confirmation for evolution (which can be considered representative, looking back through years of similar examples in Creation-Evolution Headlines), wrath remains at a fever pitch against alternatives to Darwinian evolution.  An interesting article in PhysOrg claimed that many scientists do not have a problem mixing science and religion – provided the religion completely disallows even an unspecified “designer” any active role in the process of evolution.  “Nearly all of the scientists – religious and nonreligious alike – have a negative impression of the theory of intelligent design,” the article stated about results of a poll among scientists.  The venom against anyone disbelieving evolution was sizzling in an article on Techie Buzz reviewing a new Canadian book for children about evolution, entitled “Evolution: How We and All Living Things Came to Be,” by Daniel Loxton.  In the review, Debjyoti Bardhan started by ranting against the religious right in America, described as “a powerful Christian creationist lobby sitting in the various corridors of power… well-funded, politically powerful and extremely motivated, ready at a moment’s notice to take steps against anything deemed remotely anti-Christian.”  Standing in stark contrast are the truth-seekers, scientists who study evolution: “evolutionary theory has continued to grow, just as scientific truth does.”  Bardhan and Loxton repeated several boilerplate memes: that evolutionary theory is as well established as Newton’s theory of gravity, that evolution is science and anything else is religion, that “intelligent design” (always with scare quotes) is a rechristened avatar of Creationism, etc.  Ironically, Loxton’s book uses the evolution of drug-resistant bacteria as evidence. “Not one piece of evidence has disproved evolutionary theory,” Bardhan asserted.4  Indeed; how could it?  Evolution explains everything.  Whether a theory that explains everything is a good scientific theory is a completely different question. 1.  D’Costa, King et al., “Antibiotic resistance is ancient,” Nature 477  (22 September 2011), pp. 457–461, doi:10.1038/nature10388. 2.  Michael Bevan, “Genomics: Endless variation most beautiful,” Nature 477 (22 September 2011), pp. 415–416, doi:10.1038/477415a. 3. Gan, Stegle et al., “Multiple reference genomes and transcriptomes for Arabidopsis thaliana,” Nature 477 (22 September 2011), pp. 419–423, doi:10.1038/nature10414. 4. Bardhan suggested a falsification test for evolution: “Not one piece of evidence has disproved evolutionary theory, despite there being extremely easy ways to do so (‘Just find a fossil rabbit in the Precambrian’, as J.B.S Haldane put it).”  It is true that no Precambrian rabbits have turned up yet; however, other fossil discoveries nearly as unexpected have, and yet evolutionists found ways to incorporate the damaging evidence (for examples, search for “Precambrian rabbit” in our search bar).  It is doubtful, therefore, that a real Precambrian rabbit would actually disprove evolutionary theory. There is only one explanation for these observations: (1) evolutionism cannot be falsified, (2) evolutionary theory assumes what it needs to prove, (3) evolutionists continue to maintain such passion about their theory, and (4) evolutionary theory relies on miracles: things originate, appear, emerge, develop, and arise.  The explanation: evolution is a religion masquerading as science. On that topic, learn about Darwin’s religious views in this new article by Richard Weikart on American Thinker.  Coupled with Richard Dawkins’ oft-quoted statement that Darwinism allows one to become an intellectually-fulfilled atheist, it’s no wonder that Darwin’s disciples are so militant in their faith and energetic about keeping the real motivations hidden behind a facade of false-front scientific evidence to support their religion.(Visited 52 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africa: talk directly to local government

first_imgMillions of South Africans are online, which the country is exploiting to bring local government closer to the people. Residents can communicate directly with officials through a new digital platform, which allows them to send instant messages to ward councillors.GovChat is an online platform that allows South Africans to communicate directly with ward councillors. (Image: Screengrab via YouTube)Brand South Africa reporterInternet technology has vastly improved communication. And now there is a platform that gives South Africans a direct line to their respective ward councillors. What’s more, residents are also able to send images, photos, videos, public and private messages in real time.Interact directly with your Ward Councillor about your community’s challenges. Visit https://t.co/4Pett3VrRC and register now #GovChat pic.twitter.com/8C2Nf4wnbl— GovChat (@govchatsa) October 15, 2016The platform is an initiative of the South African Local Government Association (Salga).Follow these five easy steps to access it:Visit www.govchat.org.za and choose the registration button.Fill in your account details and choose a password you’ll remember easily.Set up your profile and share your location.Set up your membership.Agree to the terms and conditions and click on ‘complete sign up’.Once you receive the activation email and follow the directions, you are able to join the conversation. See this:AdvantagesDid you know? You can now create your own community group on the GovChat website. Register to get in touch with your community. pic.twitter.com/iDUmKWyGNj— South African Gov (@GovernmentZA) October 13, 2016“We are pleased that Salga has integrated GovChat as a valuable communications tool that will connect citizens to their local ward councillors,” said Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) director-general Donald Liphoko.GovChat aims to break barriers of communication and support civic engagement.“It will go a long way in bridging the divide between the electorate and public representatives.“The service will improve for the better as councillors will be at the frontline of providing instant and credible information to the people they serve,” the government said.GovChat, said Liphoko, gave people the opportunity to speak to councillors on many topics, including housing, access to water and electricity, safety and job creation initiatives in their areas.The country’s National Development Plan calls for a “responsive, accountable, effective, local government system”, and GovChat is a step towards attaining that goal.According to the GCIS, South Africans are becoming increasingly connected. There are more than 26 million active internet users, 13 million of whom are active social media users.The plan for the near future is to make GovChat available on Android and iOS devices.Click here to go to the GovChat site.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Why I Wrote The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need

first_imgMy book, The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need, will be published on October 11th, 2016.The first publisher that reached out to me asking me to write a book didn’t want the book I wanted to write. They didn’t understand why I started the book with a chapter on self-discipline. In their view, the book only got worse. They wanted to know what things like optimism, caring, initiative, and resourcefulness were doing in a book on sales. I wanted to know how they couldn’t understand why these attributes were important, so I asked them if they ever sold or managed a sales team. Unfortunately, they hadn’t.To be fair, they expected a book written by a consultant to help win new consulting clients. They thought the audience should be different, and therefore the book made no sense to them.A second publisher that reached out to me pitched me on writing a book. They didn’t really care what the book was about. They cared mostly about how many books I thought I could sell, and how willing I was to commit to buying thousands of books from them myself.I argued that they really didn’t pitch me with a good value proposition. They said that their imprint was impressive, that it would give me credibility. I couldn’t think of a single book I ever bought that I bought because of the imprint, and I buy a lot of books.Going It AloneI wanted to write the book I wanted to write. With a couple of unimpressive conversations under my belt, I decided to publish the book myself.I wrote the book. Next, I hired a professional editor to edit the book with me. Editing is a painful process. In the first chapter, I used the words “dream clients” four times. His note said, “Am I supposed to know what this means? If I don’t know, how will the reader know?” I told him the people who read my blog would know what I mean when I say “dream clients.” He made me define it the first time it appears in the book.This went on for 18 more chapters, and the book was greatly improved. When we finished, we started over.I loaded the manuscript up on Createspace, and I began working through the process of self-publishing. Now I had total control.With a Little Help From My FriendsSix weeks before publishing, I received a direct message on Twitter from an editor at Portfolio asking me why I hadn’t written a book. I explained that I had spoken with a couple of publishers, but I didn’t find the value proposition compelling, so I decided to go it alone. He asked if he might share a few ideas about how I might improve my results, and I agreed to connect.We scheduled a call. He hated the title. He hated the subtitle. He wasn’t exactly sure that my book fulfilled its title’s promise with what was inside the covers. He told me if the book did well, he’d give me a deal on the next book. I told him I valued his advice, and that he should read the book and tell me everything I got wrong, and I would do my best to improve upon it.Six days later he sent me a two-book deal. He said that he didn’t expect to like the book nearly as much as he did. Portfolio has been an exceptional partner, and because they publish sales books, they totally understood the book and why I wrote it.Between the CoversThe book is made up of two halves. The first half of the book is made up of nine elements that, when mastered, will help you become someone worth buying from. The second half is made up of the eight skills you need to succeed in sales now.I wrote this book for salespeople. I wanted to write a book that would help salespeople improve their results. If you want to do the work to produce better results, this book will be your guide. You can do the work alone, if necessary. You can also get a free workbook to help you.If you are sales manager, this book will give you a new lens through which to view the individuals that make up your team. You will be able to quickly identify the areas where the individuals on your team need improvement, and how you can help them. There are also videos and tele-seminars available that you can use for team meetings when you pre-order.If you are a leader, you are going to want this book for your managers and their people. You are also going to want to use it as a hiring guide and an on-boarding guide for sales operations and training.If you are interested in preordering the book, there are amazing bonus offers for you here: preorder.theonlysalesguide.com.last_img read more

Former India cricket captain Pataudi passes away

first_imgFormer India cricket captain Mansoor Ali Khan Pataudi, who was suffering from lung infection succumbed to his illness on Thursday.Earlier in the day he was admitted to the ICU at the Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, where his condition was stated to be critical.Seventy-year-old Pataudi was admitted to the hospital last month following severe lung infection.After investigations, he was found to be suffering from interstitial lung disease, a condition in which the passage of oxygen to the two lungs is less than normal.He was being closely monitored by a team of pulmonologists and critical care specialists, the bulletin said.Pataudi, regarded as one of the finest Indian captains, played 46 Tests for the country, scoring 2,793 runs for an average of 34.91 with an unbeaten 203 being his highest score.In all, he smashed six centuries and 16 fifties in his career.last_img read more

SEZ Authority Anticipates Billions in Investments, Hundreds of Thousands of Jobs

first_imgStory Highlights Mr. Seaga said that investors from across the globe are establishing businesses locally, noting that interests from countries with which Jamaica has had no previous relations “are now knocking at our doors”. Chairman of the Jamaica Special Economic Zone Authority (JSEZA), Metry Seaga, says the Special Economic Zones (SEZ) landscape, when fully mature, will boast “many billions in investments” and hundreds of thousands of jobs in a range of sectors, including manufacturing, logistics, and business process outsourcing (BPO). “We have seen significant growth in the BPO industry segment… and the time is right to start realising significant growth in other areas as well,” he said. Chairman of the Jamaica Special Economic Zone Authority (JSEZA), Metry Seaga, says the Special Economic Zones (SEZ) landscape, when fully mature, will boast “many billions in investments” and hundreds of thousands of jobs in a range of sectors, including manufacturing, logistics, and business process outsourcing (BPO).In just under two years since its establishment, Mr. Seaga said the JSEZA already has on the ground more than US$500 million in investments and over 5,000 jobs in SEZs.“We have seen significant growth in the BPO industry segment… and the time is right to start realising significant growth in other areas as well,” he said.He was speaking at the official opening of the authority at Waterloo Road, St. Andrew, on July 11.Mr. Seaga said that investors from across the globe are establishing businesses locally, noting that interests from countries with which Jamaica has had no previous relations “are now knocking at our doors”.He said that local investors “are jumping at the opportunity to play their part in the investment landscape”.“Our talented people, nearshore location, robust telecommunications network, track record and our commitment to keeping our laws, regulations and incentive framework as modern and investor-friendly as possible, make Jamaica the ideal location for investment,” he pointed out.Mr. Seaga said that there is a push to connect local suppliers, including small businesses, with SEZ investors.“As we know, investments can have a tremendous ripple effect, but we have to create the space for it to work,” he said.Mr. Seaga informed that a “clear plan” has been developed to ensure the success of the SEZs, which outlines the activities to be undertaken and how these will be carried out.He said that the plan “must be integrated into our larger economic development strategy”.Additionally, Mr. Seaga indicated that work is ongoing to establish a sound and legal regulatory framework, while assuring that “we are working with you, our stakeholders, to address any gaps that exist in the legislation”.Mr. Seaga noted the support from Prime Minister, the Most. Hon. Andrew Holness, for the authority and its work, which he said, “bodes well for us”.“We aim to develop a joined-up approach to this segment of government business (and) call on all agency heads, Permanent Secretaries and Ministers to put their weight behind a cause that is for our country, Jamaica,” he urged.The SEZs, which will replace the free zone regime, are pivotal elements of the Government’s Global Logistics Hub Initiative (GLHI).They are geographically defined areas that offer simple and efficient business regulations and procedures to investors.The GLHI aims to position Jamaica as the fourth node in the global supply chain, along with facilities in Singapore; Rotterdam, Netherlands; and Dubai, United Arab Emirates.last_img read more

Go BehindTheScenes With Ben Affleck For Earth Day

first_imgThe Climate Reality Project, the leading international organization dedicated to mobilizing action on climate change, and Charitybuzz, the global leader in online charity auctions, today announced the launch of the two-week Climate Reality auction.This auction will run from April 22 – May 6 at www.Charitybuzz.com/ClimateRealityProject.The auction, which begins on Earth Day, will raise funds for the Climate Reality Leadership Corps educational and grassroots-organizing program, with 2013 trainings in Istanbul, Turkey; Chicago, Illinois, and Rio de Janerio, Brazil. The Climate Reality Leadership Corps is currently made up of 4000 Climate Leaders from 58 countries who educate their communities about climate change impacts and solutions.Items featured in the Climate Reality auction include the following:• Meet Ben Affleck with a day-long set visit on his next film • Meet country music superstar and American Idol judge Keith Urban with VIP tickets to an upcoming concert• Tickets to the Vera Wang Fashion Show During New York Fashion Week • A Versace gown worn by Academy Award winner Charlize Theron• Meet Chelsea Handler with VIP tickets to Chelsea Lately • Tickets for 2 to the Galapagos Islands on a Lindblad Expeditions National Geographic vessel• An autographed guitar from Maroon 5• Tickets to the 2014 Sundance Film Festival and Awards Party• Premium tickets to see Celine Dion at a Las Vegas concert • Tickets to the critically acclaimed play “The Weir” in London and a private meet and greet with lead actor Brian Cox• Meet Jackson Browne with VIP tickets to his upcoming tour• Autographed copy of Betty White’s newest book and autographed picture• VIP tickets to “Dancing with the Stars”• Ultimate Disneyland Family VIP Package“We are incredibly grateful to these friends who are generously contributing their unique talents to support the Climate Reality Leadership Corps program, which is changing the cultural conversation about climate change and driving for solutions,” said Climate Reality CEO Maggie L. Fox.last_img read more

Mikmaq ramping up efforts to protect Nova Scotia waterway

first_imgTrina Roache APTN National NewsIt’s an important Nova Scotia waterway and the Mi’kmaq are determined to protect it.Last month, the province issued permits for a controversial natural gas project.One Mi’kmaq band filed an appeal Thursday hoping to bring the project to a halt.last_img

People on the Move

first_img The MPA named Susan Fraysse Russ senior VP of communications. Russ joins the team from Reader’s Digest Association where she was VP of global communications and president of Reader’s Digest Foundation. Time Inc.’s Entertainment Weekly announced promotion and new editorial hires. Mashable has hired Heidi Moore as business editor to oversee coverage of business, marketing, media and startups. Moore had been the U.S. finance and economics editor for the U.S. edition of The Guardian. First Look Media has had a volatile first year and a half of existence, but the company is hoping its latest hire can bring some stability. Kerri Chyka was promoted to VP of communications for Time Inc. where she will oversee an expanded news and lifestyle portfolio including Time, Real Simple, Fortune, Health, Cooking Light, Money, MyRecipes and All You. Meeta Agrawal has been elevated to deputy editor. She is being promoted from executive editor and will provide editorial oversight for EW while continuing to work closely with the digital team to oversee cross-platform initiatives. Here’s the rest of this week’s people on the move: Bloom’s most recent gig was as the founder of media and tech advisory firm, Woodshed Ventures, but he’s had a number of corporate media roles. He served as CEO of Guardian News and Media for North America from 2012 to 2014, and as chief digital officer for Wenner Media before that. Gillian Telling has been named senior editor, TV and will begin March 16. She is joining the EW team from PEOPLE, where she served as a staff editor since 2013. Michael Bloom is joining the group as president and general manager, where he’ll “be responsible for both the journalistic future of the organization and developing commercial opportunities to support First Look Media.” Anna Roth has been hired by Civil Eats as senior editor. Roth had most recently been the food and drink editor for SF Weekly. He’s faced with a much different situation in First Look though. Founded by eBay billionaire Pierre Omidyar in 2013, the company has already gone through a number of high-profile hirings, resignations and exposés. Gina McIntyre is joining as news director (movies) based out of L.A. McIntyre will edit the News & Notes section of the magazine, film features and oversee movie news coverage across all platforms.last_img read more