Vermont Business Roundtable names new board members

first_imgTim Mueller, outgoing Chairman of the Vermont BusinessRoundtable and President of Okemo Mountain Resort, announced the electionof the new slate of officers and board members for the coming year at theorganization’s 17th Annual Membership Meeting held at Stoweflake Resort &Conference Center on December 2nd.The Roundtable’s Officers for 2005 are: Chairman: Staige Davis,President, Lang Associates; Vice-Chairman: Timothy R. Volk, President,Kelliher Samets Volk; Secretary: Daria V. Mason, President and CEO,Central Vermont Medical Center; and Treasurer: Douglas J. Wacek,President and CEO, Union Mutual of Vermont Companies.Newly elected Chairman, Staige Davis acknowledged the hard work of theRoundtable’s members during the past year in areas related to health carereform, growth center planning, improved educational outcomes, andworkforce training. Said Davis, “The Roundtable has provided importantleadership in catalyzing stakeholders around these issues and we expectthat our activity will become increasingly important over the comingyear.”The Roundtable’s Board of Directors for 2005 include: George B. Chandler,President and CEO, Hubbardton Forge; James L. Daily, President, PorterMedical Center, Inc.; Christopher L. Dutton, President and CEO, GreenMountain Power Corporation; Carolyn Edwards, President and CEO,Competitive Computing; Thomas W. Huebner, President, Rutland RegionalMedical Center; Spencer R. Knapp, Managing Partner, Dinse, Knapp &McAndrew, P.C.; John H. Marshall, Managing Partner, Downs Rachlin MartinPLLC; William R. Milnes, Jr., President and CEO, Blue Cross and BlueShield of Vermont; Chris A. Robbins, Executive Vice President,EHV-Weidmann Industries, Inc.; Lawrence E. Sudbay, President and CEO,SymQuest Group, Inc.; William H. Truex, Jr., CEO, Truex Cullins & PartnersArchitects; Marc A. vanderHeyden, President, Saint Michael’s College; andHarvey M. Yorke, President and CEO, Southwestern Vermont Health Care.The following CEOs have joined the Roundtable membership during 2004:Jeffrey P. Johnson, President, Primmer & Piper, P.C.; Neil J. Joseph,President, Sonnax Industries, Inc.; Mary E. McLaughlin, Area VicePresident VT/NH, Adelphia; Trey C. Pecor, President, Lake ChamplainTransportation; and G. Kenneth Perine, President, National Bank ofMiddlebury.Created in 1987 as a nonprofit, public interest organization, the VermontBusiness Roundtable is comprised of 120 CEOs of Vermont’s top private andnonprofit employers dedicated to making Vermont the best place in Americato do business, be educated, and live life through collaboration, researchand analysis, and communication and advocacy. Member businesses employover 47,000 employees and are represented in virtually every county acrossVermont.last_img read more

Ecopixel launches new Skimaven site

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–Ecopixel, a Web services firm in Burlington, Vt., announced in January the launch of a new commercial Web site at www.Skimaven.com(link is external). The site features a ski blog written by local skier and writer Kris Surette. It provides ski trip reports and images, information on resorts and backcountry trails, and insight into on-snow activities around Vermont. Providing Vermont businesses with a new online advertising venue, Skimaven.coms target audience is alpine, backcountry and cross-country skiers, both inside and outside of the state.Ecopixel is a Web services firm that delivers compelling, easy-to-manage Web sites, reliable hosting, and targeted online visibility and marketing.last_img read more

Southern Vermont College dedicates Hunter Hall

first_imgSouthern Vermont College will dedicate on Saturday its newest addition to campus, the 41,000 square foot Hunter Hall, which includes living space for more than 110 additional students as well as a high tech Simulation Laboratory and a Science Laboratory for student learning, office and conference space, computer lab and Wellness Center. The SVC community has invited the public to join students, trustees, faculty and staff, public officials, major donors, and contractors for a special dedication and ribbon cutting ceremony, at 11 am in the Greenberg Atrium of Hunter Hall. The event will be followed by a reception and tours.“Southern Vermont College is very proud of this beautiful new addition,” said President Karen Gross, who remarked that it is the first major building the school has built in 17 years. “This is a multi-purpose structure that personifies all the possibilities a career launching education at SVC offers.” The facility includes a permanent state-of-the-art Simulation Lab where students in nursing and other health care programs can practice a wide range of skills on anatomically correct, computer programmed, interactive patient simulators. The Sim Lab, one of only a handful in the state of Vermont, provides a valuable, realistic tool for students in the burgeoning field of health care, according to SVC Division Nursing Chair Patricia Wrightsman. “Having a Sim family – father, mother (who gives birth), young child and infant – and the supporting technology, facilitates clinical training in all areas of patient care in the safety of an on-campus lab.”The living and learning spaces that comprise Hunter Hall and Greenberg Atrium were made possible by private donors, institutions and organizations, including donations by the late Irene Hunter of Manchester and by Norman and Selma Greenberg of Bennington. Support for the science labs came from several entities including Senior Whole Health, SVC trustee Deborah Wiley, Adirondack Audio & Visual, and Federal support secured with assistance from Senator Patrick Leahy. Significant donations of equipment from Rutland Regional Medical Center and Dartmouth Hitchcock.Medical Center also made the science labs possible.“This remarkable building happened because of the remarkable generosity and hard work of many individuals. The project, completed both on time and on budget, is cause for celebration,” Gross added. Reverend Jerrod Hugenot of the Bennington Interfaith Council and First Baptist Church will open the event with a non-sectarian dedication and Southern Vermont College Trustee Mary Wicker will speak on behalf of the College’s Board.The college broke ground on the $7.5 million building in June 2008 and was ready for students to occupy two of its wings in January 2009, a construction feat that is essentially unheard of, according to Chief Financial Officer James Beckwith. Beckwith credits the many local and regional contractors brought in for getting the job done in record time. Keeping this a project that would benefit local businesses was also a priority for SVC. “Most of the contractors were Bennington-based or resided within a 50 mile radius and most of the supplies were locally purchased,” Beckwith said. The new building uses many green technologies, including heavy insulation and efficient lighting.Founded in 1926, Southern Vermont College offers a career-enhancing, liberal arts education with 22 academic degree programs for approximately 500 students. Southern Vermont College recognizes the importance of educating students for the workplace of the twenty-first century and for lives as successful leaders in their communities. SVC’s intercollegiate athletics teams are part of the New England Collegiate Conference. The college is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.Source: SVC.last_img read more

CVPS reports increase in earnings for 2009

first_img Central Vermont Public Service Corporation – Consolidated Earnings Release (dollars in thousands, except per share amounts) Three Months Ended Twelve Months Ended December 31 December 31Condensed income statement 2009 2008 2009 2008 ———- ———- ———- ———-Operating revenues: Retail sales $ 71,997 $ 71,732 $ 277,529 $ 283,073 Resale sales 13,027 8,211 54,279 48,641 Provision for rate refund (561) (234) (1,689) (296) Other 2,490 2,975 11,979 10,744 ———- ———- ———- ———-Total operating revenues 86,953 82,684 342,098 342,162 ———- ———- ———- ———-Operating expenses: Purchased power – affiliates and other 40,091 41,132 157,982 165,451 Other operating expenses 44,084 42,059 160,195 153,403 Income tax expense 492 (947) 5,033 4,878 ———- ———- ———- ———-Total operating expense 84,667 82,244 323,210 323,732 ———- ———- ———- ———-Utility operating income 2,286 440 18,888 18,430 ———- ———- ———- ———-Other income: Equity in earnings of affiliates 4,276 4,022 17,472 16,264 Other, net 3 13 1,511 (879) Income tax expense (1,632) (1,512) (5,640) (5,862) ———- ———- ———- ———- Total other income 2,647 2,523 13,343 9,523 ———- ———- ———- ———-Interest expense 2,753 2,968 11,482 11,568 ———- ———- ———- ———-Net income 2,180 (5) 20,749 16,385Dividends declared on preferred stock 92 92 368 368 ———- ———- ———- ———-Earnings available for common stock $ 2,088 $ (97) $ 20,381 $ 16,017 ========== ========== ========== ==========Per common share dataEarnings per share of common stock – basic $ 0.18 $ (0.01) $ 1.75 $ 1.53Earnings per share of common stock – diluted $ 0.18 $ (0.01) $ 1.74 $ 1.52Average shares of common stock outstanding – basic 11,697,392 10,863,926 11,660,170 10,458,220Average shares of common stock outstanding – diluted 11,764,277 10,863,926 11,705,518 10,536,131Dividends declared per share of common stock $ 0.00 $ 0.00 $ 0.92 $ 0.92Dividends paid per share of common stock $ 0.23 $ 0.23 $ 0.92 $ 0.92Supplemental financial statement dataBalance sheet Investments in affiliates $ 129,733 $ 102,232 Total assets $ 632,152 $ 626,126 Notes Payable (reclassified to long-term debt) $ 0 $ 10,800 Common stock equity $ 231,423 $ 219,479 Long-term debt (excluding current portions) $ 201,611 $ 167,500Cash FlowsCash and cash equivalents at beginning of period $ 6,722 $ 3,803 Cash provided by operating activities 42,042 28,400 Cash used for investing activities (52,931) (40,498) Cash provided by financing activities 6,236 15,017 ———- ———- Cash and cash equivalents at end of period $ 2,069 $ 6,722 ========== ========== Refer to our annual 2009 Form 10-K for additional information.Source: RUTLAND, VT — (Marketwire) — 03/15/10 — CentralVermont Public Service (NYSE: CV) 2009 results compared to 2008Operating revenues decreased $0.1 million year-over-year, including a $5.5 million decrease in retail revenues, an increase of $1.4 million in the provision for rate refunds, partially offset by a $1.2 million increase in other operating revenues, and a $5.6 million increase in resale revenue. The decrease in retail revenues resulted from lower average usage resulting from the sluggish economy, energy conservation, and the loss of three commercial and industrial customers due to plant closures, partially offset by higher average unit prices due to customer usage mix. The provision for rate refund is related to the 2009 deferrals of over-collection of power, production and transmission costs as required by the power cost adjustment clause within our alternative regulation plan. The over-collection of power costs is being returned to retail customers through the second quarter of 2010. Other operating revenues increased primarily due to increased sales of transmission rights and renewable energy credits and increased wholesale rates. Resale revenues increased due to higher volumes of excess power available for resale, partially offset by lower average market prices.Purchased power expense decreased $7.5 million, primarily due to a $9.7 million reduction of short-term power purchases and a $3.9 million decrease in purchases from Independent Power Producers. These reductions were partially offset by an increase in other power costs of $6.1 million. This was primarily due to higher output at the Vermont Yankee plant in 2009 and because there were no refueling outages at the Vermont Yankee or Millstone III plants in 2009. Other operating expenses increased $6.8 million, primarily due to a $5.7 million increase in transmission expenses due to higher rates and higher costs from Vermont Transco LLC (“Transco”) for its capital projects, offset by higher NOATT reimbursements. Other increased costs included higher regulatory amortizations of $2.2 million, primarily related to the recovery of 2008 major storm costs, higher depreciation expense of $1.3 million, higher property taxes of $1.3 million and higher reserves for uncollectible accounts of $0.5 million. These higher costs were partially offset by a $3.8 million decrease in maintenance expenses, primarily due to lower service restoration costs. There were several major storms in 2008, but just one major storm in 2009.Equity in earnings of affiliates increased $1.2 million, principally due to the $3.1 million investment that we made in Transco in December 2008, and other accumulated adjustments. Other income, net increased $2.4 million, largely due to an increase in the cash surrender value of variable life insurance policies held in trust to fund a supplemental employee retirement plan.Fourth quarter 2009 results compared to 2008Fourth quarter operating revenues increased $4.3 million for many of the same reasons described above.Purchased power expense decreased $1 million for the same reasons described above. Short-term purchases decreased $5.9 million, partially offset by an increase in other purchases of $4.8 million.Other operating expenses increased $2 million, including a $2.4 million increase in transmission expenses, and for many of the same reasons described above. These higher costs were partially offset by lower maintenance costs for the same reasons described above.Equity in earnings of affiliates increased $0.3 million for the same reasons described above.2008 Common Stock IssuanceEarnings per share for 2009 reflect the impact of the November 2008 common stock issuance. On November 24, 2008, CV issued 1,190,000 shares, resulting in net proceeds of approximately $21.3 million. The net proceeds of the offering were used for general corporate purposes, including the repayment of debt, capital expenditures, investments in Transco and working capital requirements. The common stock issuance decreased per-diluted-share earnings by 18 cents in 2009. There was no significant impact to per-diluted-share earnings for the fourth quarter of 2009.2010 Financial GuidanceCV anticipates annual 2010 earnings to be in the range of $1.55 to $1.70 per diluted share. As part of the alternative regulation plan base rate filing approved by the Vermont Public Service Board, the company’s allowed rate of return for 2010 will be 9.59 percent, down from 9.77 percent for 2009.WebcastCV will host an earnings teleconference and webcast on March 15, 2010, beginning at 2 p.m. EDT. At that time, CV President and CEO Robert Young and CV Chief Financial Officer Pamela Keefe will discuss the company’s financial results, as well as progress made toward achieving the company’s long-term strategy.Interested parties may listen to the conference call live on the Internet by selecting the “CVPS Q4 2009 Earnings Call” link on the “Investor Relations” section of the company’s website at www.cvps.com(link is external). An audio archive of the call will be available later that day at the same location or by dialing 1-877-660-6853 within the U.S. or internationally by dialing 1-201-612-7415 and entering Account 286 and Conference ID 341962.About CVCV is Vermont’s largest electric utility, serving approximately 159,000 customers statewide. CV’s non-regulated subsidiary, Catamount Resources Corporation, sells and rents electric water heaters through a subsidiary, SmartEnergy Water Heating Services.Form 10-KOn Monday, March 15, 2010, the company filed its annual 2009 Form 10-K with the Securities and Exchange Commission. A copy of that report is available on our web site, www.cvps.com(link is external), under the “Investor Relations” section. Please refer to it for additional information regarding our condensed consolidated financial statements, results of operations, capital resources and liquidity. Central Vermont Public Service (NYSE: CV) reported consolidated earnings of $20.4 million, or $1.74 per diluted share of common stock, for the 12 months of 2009, compared to $16 million, or $1.52 per diluted share of common stock, for the same period in 2008.CV reported fourth-quarter 2009 consolidated earnings of $2.1 million, or 18 cents per diluted share of common stock, compared to a loss of $0.1 million, or 1 cent per diluted share of common stock, for the same period last year.”Perhaps most significant, Moody’s Investors Service rated the company at investment grade in the fourth quarter, markedly improving our borrowing capability,” President Bob Young said. “These ratings will allow CVPS to borrow short-term capital at lower rates than we could otherwise expect to receive, and will reduce or eliminate collateral requirements in many power purchase and power sales contracts, so this expands our options as we look to secure new power supply in the future.”We also plan to continue to make significant capital investments in our company and Vermont’s transmission system through Transco, providing customers with good reliability and investors with a solid return,” Young said.Financial Highlights– 2009 earnings of $20.4 million, or $1.74 per diluted share, 22 cents higher than 2008 — $0.1 million decrease in operating revenue — $7.5 million decrease in purchased power expense — $6.8 million increase in other operating expenses — $1.2 million increase in equity in earnings of affiliates — $2.4 million increase in other income, net– Fourth-quarter earnings of $2.1 million, or 18 cents per diluted share, 19 cents higher than 2008 — $4.3 million increase in operating revenue — $1.0 million decrease in purchased power expense — $2.0 million increase in other operating expenses — $0.3 million increase in equity in earnings of affiliates– Earnings for 2010 are forecasted to be in the range of $1.55 to $1.70 per diluted share Forward-Looking StatementsStatements contained in this press release that are not historical fact are forward-looking statements intended to qualify for the safe-harbors from the liability established by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Statements made that are not historical facts are forward-looking and, accordingly, involve estimates, assumptions, risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. Actual results will depend, among other things, upon the actions of regulators, performance of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, effects of and changes in weather and economic conditions, volatility in wholesale electric markets, volatility in the financial markets, and our ability to maintain our current credit ratings. These and other risk factors are detailed in CV’s Securities and Exchange Commission filings. CV cannot predict the outcome of any of these matters; accordingly, there can be no assurance that such indicated results will be realized. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements that speak only as of the date of this press release. CV does not undertake any obligation to publicly release any revision to these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this press release. Reconciliation of Earnings Per Diluted Share Twelve Months Fourth Quarter 2009 vs. 2008 2009 vs. 2008 ————– ————–2008 Earnings per diluted share $ 1.52 $ (0.01)Year-over-Year Effects on Earnings: Lower purchased power expense 0.42 0.06 Higher equity in earnings of affiliates 0.09 0.02 Higher operating revenues 0.00 0.25 Higher transmission expense (0.32) (0.14) Common stock issuance (Nov. 2008) – 1,190,000 additional shares (0.18) 0.00 (Higher) lower other operating expenses (0.02) 0.01 Other (mostly variable life insurance) 0.23 (0.01) ————– ————–2009 Earnings per diluted share $ 1.74 $ 0.18 ============== ==============(a) The additional shares from the November 2008 stock issuance were excluded from the 11,764,277 average shares of common stock – diluted for the fourth quarter and the 11,705,518 average shares of common stock – diluted for the twelve months, for the purposes of computing the individual EPS variances shown above in order to provide comparable information for 2009 vs. 2008.last_img read more

Dr Barbara Vacarr named new Goddard College president

first_imgThe Board of Trustees of Goddard College has elected Dr Barbara Vacarr as its next president.  Dr Vacarr is currently serving as Director of Lesley University’s School of Education PhD Programs in Cambridge. The announcement came following a special meeting of Goddard’s Board of Trustees. Vacarr is expected to assume leadership of Goddard College on July 1, 2010, when President Mark Schulman steps away. Dr Schulman, Goddard’s third-longest serving president, has led Goddard since 2003. The presidential search process began in June 2009 when Dr Schulman announced to the Goddard Board of Trustees that he wished to return to his home in California at the end of his term. A Search Committee was formed, comprised of trustee, faculty, student and staff representatives who worked closely with the consultancy firm Academic Search to guide the search process. The Committee interviewed select applicants and the top three candidates were invited to the Plainfield, Vermont campus to make formal presentations and engage with Goddard’s faculty, staff, and students. Following these sessions and an extensive review of the various constituencies’ input, the Search Committee recommended the appointment of Dr. Vacarr as Goddard’s next leader to the Board of Trustees at their February 2010 meeting.“Throughout the process, I was impressed with the active engagement of the Goddard community, its warmth and genuine caring for students and for one another”, Vacarr said. “The mission and spirit of Goddard is inspirational and I am deeply honored with this opportunity to lead an institution that continually and consciously strives to live its commitments. I have been an admirer of Goddard throughout my career as an educator and feel privileged to serve in a college that models best practices of teaching and adult learning. I see this as a time for Goddard to claim the expertise and vision that lives in this community and to assume a more public voice as an educational leader and innovator”“Dr Vacarr appreciates the role that Goddard plays in higher education”, said Board Chair Joan Shafran, a graduate of the Goddard Adult Degree Program.  “She will uphold, enhance and expand Goddard’s reputation as an experimenting institution, making the extraordinary Goddard model of education available to more students across North America and around the world. She can respond to those who are looking for an educational model that will serve students of the 21st century, a model that reflects the ideals of democracy, caring for others and the welfare of the earth, fulfilling our mission.”Trustee Stephen Friedman, chair of the Presidential Search Committee, said, “Our national search has been wonderfully successful for Goddard. Dr. Vacarr connected with each member of the committee and the Board in a way that indicates she will continue adding to Goddard’s years of growth, and that she will build upon the College’s position as the national leader in progressive higher education. “Vacarr has been developing and leading programs and teaching adults at Lesley University for the past 22 years. She conceptualized and developed the new doctoral program in Adult Learning, was instrumental in developing a Joint BS/MA in Clinical Mental Health Counseling, a joint BS/MA in self-designed interdisciplinary study, a Specialization for Substance Abuse Counseling and Certification, and an interdisciplinary program in Elder Studies. Vacarr brings appreciation of the important role that experience plays in learning, and facilitates collaborative processes that free creativity and invite innovation.Vacarr has maintained a private counseling practice, led the Cambodian Youth and Missing History Documentary Project, was an interviewer for the Shoah Foundation’s Visual History of the Shoah Project and has conducted research for the Center for Psychology and Social Change.Goddard College developed the first adult degree programs in 1963, and now specializes in low-residency education. Offering accredited degree programs in Plainfield, Vermont and Port Townsend, Washington that are designed to accommodate the way adults learn best, Goddard offers a rich campus experience, and a diverse academic community. Goddard’s authentic low-residency format offers the best of on-campus and online – experienced faculty advisors who are practitioners in their academic fields, an enriching on-campus experience, and the freedom to study from anywhere.For more information, visit www.goddard.edu(link is external).Source: Goddard.last_img read more

MVP, Vermont Managed Care collaborate on ‘Vermont First’

first_imgMVP Health Care,MVP Health Care and Vermont Managed Care have entered into an innovative partnership to provide Vermont residents with “Vermont First,” a unique approach to deliver high quality care through a Vermont focused network of providers.Under the partnership, Vermont Managed Care (VMC) and its network of high-quality health care providers have more control, share more data and partner with a prominent regional insurer, MVP Health Care.”Vermont First represents the future of health care through an innovative partnership that aligns the interests of MVP Health Care with providers for the benefit of Vermont’s consumers,” said David Henderson, Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer of MVP Health Care. “Only through such ‘win-win’ relationships will we rise to the challenge of true health care reform that lowers cost and enhances quality.””By combining MVP’s emphasis on wellness and our focus on high quality care, we have put together a program which will offer our patients the best of all worlds,” said Todd Moore, president, Vermont Managed Care. “Most importantly, our patients will get great care at great prices in Vermont.”Bill Little, MVP’s Vermont Vice President, added that his company worked closely with Vermont Managed Care to develop the range of choices, which include four distinct plans that include an HMO-style plan, two high deductible options and a hybrid choice.”To offer Vermont residents and employers competitive pricing, we developed a partnership that includes robust care coordination by VMC with an eye toward leveraging local health care resources which in turn helps control costs,” Little said.Moore, of Vermont Managed Care, added: “The most important attributes of Vermont First are simply that members will get access to care supported by a network of providers willing to be more accountable and coordinated in service to plan members throughout the state at a competitive price. It’s really the best of all worlds.”About MVP Health CareFounded in 1983, MVP Health Care is a community-focused, not-for-profit health insurer serving members in the states of New York, Vermont and New Hampshire. Through its operating subsidiaries, MVP Health Care provides fully insured and self-funded employer health benefits plans, dental insurance, and ancillary products, such as flexible-spending accounts, to more than 700,000 subscribers. For more information, visit: www.mvphealthcare.com(link is external).About Vermont Managed CareVermont Managed Care (VMC) was founded in 1991 as a Physician Hospital Organization. A wholly owned subsidiary of Fletcher Allen, it currently coordinates the delivery of health care services for a population served by a network of more than over 2,700 primary and specialty care providers and 10 hospitals in Vermont and New Hampshire. The VMC Network conducts its own care management, enabling the physician-run network to make day-to-day health care decisions for its patients, rather than a distant third party claims manager. BURLINGTON, VT–(Marketwire – November 22, 2011) –last_img read more

Two bridges replaced in Roxbury, Route 12A open to traffic

first_imgThe Vermont Agency of Transportation today announced that two accelerated bridge replacement projects on Route 12A in the Town of Roxbury have been completed and the roadway is now open to all traffic. ‘These are the final two bridge closures resulting from Tropical Storm Irene,’ noted VTrans’ Secretary Brian Searles. ‘We are very close to reaching our Irene Response mission of opening all our damaged roads by the end of the year.’  The final closed road under construction, Route 107 in Stockbridge, remains on track for opening at the end of next week. Luck Brothers of Plattsburg, New York, was the contractor for the replacement of bridges 15 and 22 on Route 12A, both of which cross the third branch of the White River. The total closure on October 17, allowed the bridges to be completely replaced in just under 10 weeks.  Unlike the temporary bridge replacements in other areas of Irene-affected roads, bridges 15 and 22 were permanent fixes to damaged bridges.  ‘In responding to these bridge failures we were able to deploy innovative techniques and rapid bridge deployment to complete permanent bridge replacements in record time,’ noted Rich Tetreault, VTrans’ chief engineer.  The agency also completed work this week on two culverts in the Refrigerator Flats area of Route 107.  The 1.1 mile segment between its intersection with Route 100 in Stockbridge and the Post Office in Gaysville has reopened to local traffic only. Replacing the two culverts in Stockbridge is among the final tasks necessary before Route 107 can be reopened in its entirety. Irene struck on August 28, 2011 and severely damaged more than 500 miles of state highway, including some 200 state bridges. Today, only seven miles of Route 107 between Stockbridge and Bethel remain closed to public travel. Questions regarding storm-damaged roads and bridges related to Tropical Storm Irene can be answered by calling VTrans’ Irene Storm Center at 1-800-Vermont. People can also visit VTrans’ website at www.aot.state.vt.us(link is external) where they can follow the agency’s progress on both Facebook and Twitter. VTrans 12.21.2011last_img read more