20 commission new itineraries and back to Istanbul with Celestyal

first_img MIAMI — For a limited time Celestyal Cruises is offering 20% commission on seven-day all-inclusive cruise bookings, to help kick off the launch of its newest itineraries.The company says it is “pleased to demonstrate its ongoing commitment to its North American travel agent partners” with commission paid across the majority of its cruise package components, including the cruise fare (including a standard unrestricted drinks package and select shore excursions) as well as additional pre-sold shore excursions, and pre-sold premium drinks upgrade package.The 20% commission deal is applicable on new bookings made between now and June 30 for any seven-day all-inclusive cruise departing in 2018, 2019 and 2020.As part of its goal to offer year-round cruising in the Aegean, Celestyal Cruises recently introduced three new seven-day all-inclusive itineraries: the new ‘Idyllic’ with sailings now underway; and starting in 2019 the new ‘Eclectic’ and ‘Three Continents’ itineraries.The ‘Idyllic’ sailing departs from Athens (Piraeus) and includes overnight stays in Mykonos and Santorini. Along the way passengers will discover the off-the-beaten path island of Milos, beautiful Crete and Turkey’s Kusadasi.More news:  AMResorts has a new Sr. Dir. of Cdn. Sales & Consortia Rel’nsMeanwhile the ‘Eclectic’ itinerary re-introduces Istanbul to Celestyal’s cruise programs, with weekly sailings Oct. 21 – Nov. 25, 2019. Cruises go roundtrip from Athens with an overnight in Istanbul, plus time in Greece’s Volos and Turkey’s Canakkale. Passengers on this itinerary will additionally have the opportunity to visit Crete and Santorini, and experience Mykonos with an overnight stay.Finally Celestyal’s new ‘Three Continents’ sailings will start in December 2019 with five sailings Dec. 2 – 30 that will also mark the introduction of Christmas and New Year’s cruises in the Aegean for Celestyal Cruises. Roundtrip from Athens, passengers will explore cities and villages in Greece, Egypt (Alexandria and Port Said), Israel, Cyprus (Limassol), the Greek Islands (Rhodes), and Turkey (Kusadasi). Share 20% commission, new itineraries and back to Istanbul with Celestyal Posted by << Previous PostNext Post >>center_img Friday, April 27, 2018 Tags: Celestyal Cruises Travelweek Group last_img read more

No seats No problem says airline sit on the floor instead

first_img Posted by Thursday, January 17, 2019 Share Travelweek Group No seats? No problem, says airline, sit on the floor insteadcenter_img Tags: TUI Airways MENORCA — It should go without saying: buy a ticket on an airplane and you get a seat onboard. Or do you?For one British family who booked a flight home to Birmingham, England from Menorca, Spain with TUI Airways, having tickets and assigned seats were inconsequential. In fact, when they boarded their flight, they were shocked to find their assigned seats didn’t even exist, says a BBC report.“We made sure we were three hours early at the airport to check in early, just to make sure we got seats together,” said Paula Taylor in a BBC interview. “We went straight to the front and we were very excited by the fact we had managed to sit together.”But lo and behold, when Taylor and her family arrived at their supposed row, all they found was an empty space where their seats should have been.TUI Airways, which blamed the mix-up on a “last-minute plane change”, allowed the family to sit in the crew’s jump seats in the galley during takeoff and landing. But when the crew needed the galley space during drink service, there was nowhere for Taylor and her family to sit except on the floor.More news:  Beep, beep! Transat hits the streets with Cubamania truckFor the inconvenience, TUI Airways is refunding the family’s tickets, plus adding a £30 “goodwill gesture”, reports the BBC. The incident is also being investigated by Britain’s Civil Aviation Authority. << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

MReport Celebrates Achievements of Women in Housing

first_img in Daily Dose, Headlines, News Women in Housing 2016-08-17 Seth Welborn Share MReport magazine has announced the 60 honorees who will be part of its September 2016 special issue celebrating the accomplishments of women in the mortgage industry.This year’s honorees are broken down into three categories: “Power Players,” “Leading Ladies,” and “Emerging Leaders.” The 2016 “Power Players” are five mortgage and housing veterans with roles in both the government and private sector. Fifty additional women were selected for MReport’s 2016 “Leading Ladies” and “Emerging Leaders” list.The honorees were selected from nominations from their peers in the industry, who nominated them based on leadership qualities such as intelligence, drive, and pursuit of innovation.MReport’s Women in Housing honorees will also be acknowledged at the Women in Homeownership Leadership Forum at the Five Star Conference on Tuesday, September 13, 2016, in Dallas, Texas. The keynote speaker for the Women in Housing Leadership Forum will be Laura Bush, First Lady of the United States (2001-2009). Featured speakers will be Charmaine Brown, Director of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Fannie Mae; Amy Bonitatibus, Chief Communications Officer, Mortgage Banking and Credit Card Business, JPMorgan Chase; and Dana Dillard, EVP and Chief Customer Officer, Nationstar Mortgage.2016 “Power Players”Amy Bonitatibus, Chief Communications Officer, Mortgage Banking and Credit Card Business, JPMorgan ChaseDana Dillard, Chief Customer Officer, Nationstar MortgageDeborah L. Jenkins, SVP National Head of Multifamily Underwriting & Credit, Freddie MacGlenda Gabriel, Neighborhood Lending Executive, Bank of AmericaKimberly Johnson, SVP & Chief Risk Officer, Fannie Mae2016 “Leading Ladies”Caroline Reaves, CEO, Mortgage Contracting ServicesCarolyn Thompson, President and Owner, ASONSCharmaine Brown, Director, Diversity and Inclusion, Fannie MaeCheryl Feltgen, EVP & Chief Risk Officer, Arch MIDebbie Lastoria, VP Business Development, Nationwide Title ClearingDonna DelMonte, SVP Operations, AssurantHilary B. Provinse, SVP Multifamily Customer Engagement, Fannie MaeJackie Oliver, SVP Nationstar MortgageJill A. Showell, SVP Government and Community Relations, Ocwen Financial CorporationJill Kravig Burns, Executive Vice President, Mountain West Financial, Inc.JK Huey, SVP Mortgage, Foreclosure and Asset Management, Wells FargoJody Collup, VP Marketing, Global DMSJulian Grey, Mortgage Market Leader Data & Analytics, Black Knight Financial ServicesKathy Cummings, SVP Affordable Housing and Strategic Relationships, Bank of AmericaKatrina Jones, VP, Single Family Business Solutions, Fannie MaeKellie Chambers, AVP Investor Relations, Safeguard PropertiesKelly Chapman, SVP Client Management, Auction.comKim Mitchell, Senior Director, Lender Premier Services, ClosingCorpKristy Fercho, SVP Customer Delivery Executive, Fannie MaeLaurie Maggiano, Manager for Servicing and Securitization Markets, CFPBLisa Sadaoui, President & CEO, First AllegianceMaria V. Moskver, General Counsel & Enterprise Compliance Officer, LenderLiveMarianne Sullivan, SVP Single-Family Business Capabilities, Fannie MaeMarion McDougall, EVP Operations, Caliber Home LoansMarnie Ronda Lacue Applegate, SVP Credit Risk/Policy, Pacific Union FinancialMeg Burns, Managing Director, The Collingwood GroupMelanie Feliciano, Chief Legal Officer, DocMagicMercedes G. Henricksson, Director of Sales CPM Real Estate, Fannie MaeMichelle DeLeon, Managing Partner, Default Legal Services, Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & BoyerMin Lee Alexander, SVP Real Estate Services, AltisourceNadine Bates, SVP & Treasurer, Fannie MaePam Kosanke, Chief Marketing Officer, Renters WarehousePatricia Raymo, COO Retail, LoandepotPhyllis L. Wright, Ph.D., SVP HR Strategies, VRM Mortgage ServicesRamie Word, SVP Performing Acquisitions & Borrower Communication,  Nationstar MortgageRebecca Smith, Director, Client Relations, Green River CapitalRenee Schultz, SVP Capital Markets, Fannie MaeRose Silverstein, AVP, Regional Director of New Business and Correspondent Sales Strategy, Radian Guaranty Inc.Sally French Tyler, EVP, First American Title Insurance CompanySally Taylor-Shoff, Scores Vice President, FICOSandra J. Troutman, Director, Corporate Communications, MERSCORP HoldingsSarah Alexander Goldfrank, SVP & Deputy General Counsel, Fannie MaeSerena Yang, VP, Marketing & Business Development, Civic Financial ServicesSharron P.A. Levine, Director, Office of Minority and Women Inclusion, FHFASusheel Mantha, CFO, LRES CorporationTami Bonnell, CEO, EXIT Realty Corp InternationalTerri Hunter, SVP Asset Management and Portfolio Oversight, Chronos SolutionsTracey Tran, VP Software Development, Nationwide Title ClearingTujuanna Williams, VP, Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer, Fannie Mae2016 Emerging Leaders (35 years old and under)Kelly Brooks, CEO, Property MastersTonia Conner, AVP, Acquisitions, Nationstar MortgageErika Cheyney, AVP, Operations, ZVN PropertiesAmy Sanchez, EVP, PrescientTiffany Williams, Director of Default Services, Guardian Asset Managementcenter_img August 17, 2016 838 Views MReport Celebrates Achievements of Women in Housinglast_img read more

September 12 2002 Concrete batch plant has been a

first_imgSeptember 12, 2002 Concrete batch planthas been an integral part of our construction history for many years.[Photo & text: T] Conveyer belt movessand, gravel and cement into the transit mixer truck. [Photo & text: T] Breaking cement bagsby hand is indeed a hands-on-in-dust experience for Arcosanti workshop participants. [Photo & text: T] We are back! Weapologize for the whole week of absence while our web and mail serverswere down. We missed a few of the Daily Progress postings too. Soplease check the last few we posted with this announcement. [Photo &text: T]last_img read more

Some 74 of adult broadband users in the US can no

first_imgSome 74% of adult broadband users in the US can now access broadband video and pay TV Services on a home TV, according to new research by The Diffusion Group (TDG).The study claims that the penetration of internet-connected TVs among US broadband homes has increased from 50% in 2013 to 74% at year-end 2016.However, this growth has now slowed to only 4% year-on-year, having risen by 22% between 2013 and 2014, and by another 15% between 2014 and 2015.“At 74% penetration, connected TV use is squarely in the Late Mainstream phase of its trajectory. Barring any major disruption in TV technology or market conditions, growth will slow each year as the solution reaches saturation,” said TDG president and director of research, Michael Greeson.last_img read more

Dan Steinhart Managing Editor of The Casey Report

first_img Dan Steinhart Managing Editor of The Casey Report Latin American Equities: Down but Not Out By Claudio Maulhardt, World Money Analyst Not so long ago, Latin American equities were a market darling. Then, the markets viewed signs of an economic recovery in the developed world as good news for Latin American stocks (higher EPS prospects), but signs of stagnation were also considered good news (as a lower discount rate would apply). Now, the majority of Latin American stock markets have begun to trade as if the opposite were true. With the sole exception of Mexico, whose stock market has traditionally traded closer to the S&P 500, the rest of Latin equities have lost their glow. Latin stocks have registered a seventh consecutive month of investor outflows, and it does not look like the trend is going to reverse any time soon. The change from hype to doubt is clearly reflected in the chart below. Latin equities were, incredibly, considered a safe haven after the 2008 financial crisis. From the end of 2008 to the end of 2010, Latin stocks outperformed the S&P 500 by an impressive 90%. Since then, the love affair has come to an end, and Latin equities have underperformed by more than 67%. Enjoy, and see you next week. How to Play the New Scenario So the trend is not the friend of Latin American equity investors. Is it best to shun them for the time being? It’s not that simple. Latin equities were an easy trade for many years. The fad lifted all boats regardless of their individual merits, which made trading the indices or the associated ETFs the way to go. Now, it’s not hard to see that the correction has been exacerbated by the unwinding of the macro trade. Over the last decade, the weight of Latin American equities in the MSCI World Index has doubled, surging from roughly 2% to 4.4%. The MSCI Emerging Markets Latin American Index has a US$1.5 trillion market cap, which makes simply neglecting it a tough decision for index fund managers. The problem is that it is hard to trade Latin American equities as if they were a single asset class. Trading ETFs or indices may mean that good opportunities are missed. An index is comprised of a wide array of stocks whose issuers will not necessarily perform similarly in various economic environments. Appreciating currencies and the wide availability of credit in the last decade has meant that stocks most closely linked to domestic consumption were the winners by far. The new picture of weaker currencies and tougher credit conditions means that the winners of the past may not fare as well in the future. A New Approach The next winning theme will be foreign-currency earners (mainly exporters) and, more important, stocks with little or no debt held in a foreign currency—and especially with no debt in foreign currency if it has no foreign currency income to match the servicing of that debt. Those are the characteristics you want to look for in a solid Latin American investment. It’s hard to believe that the cycle of weaker currencies, weaker current accounts, and weaker EPS growth is about to reach its end in the near future. However, this is not the end of the Latin American investment theme; it only means that the approach must change. There are companies whose business profiles will help them thrive in what may otherwise look like a generally challenging scenario for Latin American stocks. Going with the flow may prevent investors from grabbing the opportunity that these stocks offer. Given that I’m still neck-deep in assembling the October issue of The Casey Report—which covers such topics as Doug Casey’s take on the government shutdown, a hunt for emerging market opportunities, and how to construct a bulletproof portfolio—I’ll keep today’s lead-in short and sweet. This week’s article comes to us from Claudio Maulhardt, fund manager and partner at Buenos Aires-based Copernico Capital Partners, a hedge fund group that focuses on Latin American equities. Latin American stocks have taken a beating along with all emerging markets recently. Yesteryear, you could make money in Latin America by simply buying and holding a broad index and letting the rising tide do its thing. That strategy doesn’t work anymore. Instead, as Claudio will explain, you must target individual companies with specific qualities that will help them rise above lackluster market performance. He concludes with a checklist of sorts that will help you separate the right companies from the wrong ones. This article originally appeared in World Money Analyst, Mauldin Economics’ publication that features a team of globally distributed investment analysts who scour the international markets, looking for investment opportunities outside of the US. If you find Claudio’s analysis useful, you’ll probably also enjoy this free report just published by the World Money Analyst team: The Trends in Global markets and Why You Need a Foreign Broker. Click here to access it. This change in the tide may be linked to Wall Street’s permanent belief in “next year’s” US growth, a story investors seem to like despite the lack of strong empirical support. However, the main catalyst has undoubtedly been the weakness in China’s economic growth and, most important, the shift in China’s economic model from investment-driven to consumption-driven growth. There is a direct link between this “remodeling” and the string of monthly outflows that dedicated Latin American fund managers have experienced. The math is simple: Lower Chinese investment means less demand for industrial commodities, which are produced in Latin America by some of the largest companies in the region, which make up a significant part of the country and regional indices. The consensus of economists surveyed by Bloomberg was for all Latin American countries to have weaker current account balances in 2013 than in 2012. With interest rates rising and Wall Street expecting them to rise further as the US economy grows, financing the gap may become tougher for Latin economies. This brings in the linkage to exchange rates, which constitute a not insignificant portion of Latin American equities’ underperformance. Exchange rates helped EPS, book values, and leverage ratios look great in US dollar terms for many years. Now that the US dollar has strengthened against Latin American currencies, the opposite trend is under way.last_img read more

Bob Hall was recovering from yet another surgery w

first_imgBob Hall was recovering from yet another surgery when the volunteer first walked into his hospital room. It was March 2014, and unfortunately Hall had been in and out of the hospital quite a bit. It had been a rocky recovery since his lung transplant, three months earlier, at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital in Madison, Wis.But the volunteer wasn’t there to check on his lungs or breathing. Instead she asked Hall if we wanted to tell his life story.Hall was being treated at the VA because he had served in the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War. After the war, he had a political career as a Massachusetts legislator, and then led professional associations for 30 years.Hall, who was 67 at the time, welcomed the volunteer and told her he’d be happy to participate.”I’m anything but a shy guy, and I’m always eager to share details about my life,” Hall says, half-jokingly.He spoke to the volunteer for more than an hour about everything — from his time as “a D student” in high school (“I tell people I graduated in the top 95 percent of my class”) to his time in the military (“I thought the Marines were the toughest branch and I wanted to stop the communists”). He finished his story with a description of his health problems — those that that finally landed him in the hospital, and many that continue to the present day.The interview was part of a program called My Life, My Story. Volunteer writers seek out vets like Hall in the hospital, and ask them about their lives. Then they write up this life story, a 1,000-word biography, and go over it with the patient, who can add more details or correct any mistakes.”Of course, being a writer I rewrote the whole thing,” Hall confesses with a smile.Once the story is finished, it’s entered into to the patient’s electronic medical record, so any doctor or nurse working anywhere in the VA system who opens the medical record can read it.Hall was one of the earliest patients interviewed for the project, back in 2014. Today more than 2,000 patients at the Madison VA have shared their personal life stories.Project organizers say My Life, My Story could change the way providers interact with patients at VA hospitals around the country.Personalizing impersonal records”If you’re a health care person, if you’re someone who is in the [electronic medical] record all the time, you’ll know that the record is a mess,” says Thor Ringler, who has managed the My Life, My Story project since 2013.Clinicians can get access to a lot of medical data through a patient’s electronic medical record, but there’s nowhere to learn about a patient’s personality, or learn about her career, passions or values, Ringler says.”If you were to try to get a sense of someone’s life from that record, it might take you days,” Ringler says.The idea for My Life, My Story came from Dr. Elliot Lee, a medical resident who was doing a training rotation at the Madison VA in 2012. The typical rotation for medical residents lasts only about a year, so Lee wanted to find a way to bring these new, young doctors quickly up to speed on the VA patients. He wanted a way for them to absorb not just their health histories, but more personal information, like their hobbies, and which hospital staffers knew them best.”It seemed to make sense that the patient might know a lot about themselves, and could help provide information to the new doctor,” Lee recalls.But the question remained: What was the best way to get patients to share these details, to get their life stories into the records? Lee says he and some colleagues tried having patients fill out surveys, which were useful but still left the team wanting more. Next, they tried getting patients to write down their life stories themselves, but not many people really wanted to. Finally, an epiphany: Hire a writer to interview the patients, and put what they learned on paper.It wasn’t hard to find a good candidate: A poet in Madison, Thor Ringler, had also just finished his training as a family therapist. He was good at talking to people, and also skilled at condensing big thoughts into concise, meaningful sentences.”Of course!” Ringler remembers thinking. “I was made for that!'”Under Ringler’s guidance, the project has developed a set of training materials to allow other VA hospitals to launch their own storytelling programs. About 40 VA hospitals around the U.S. are currently interested, according to Ringler.Based on his experience building the program in Madison, Ringler estimates hospitals would need to hire just one writer — working half- or full-time, depending on the hospital’s size — to manage a similar storytelling program. That means the budget could be as low as $23,000 a year. That relatively small investment can pay huge dividends in terms of patient satisfaction, Ringler says, by restoring personal connections between patients and the medical team.”If we do good stories, people will read them, and they will want to read them,” he adds.In addition to the interest from within the VA system, the idea has spread farther — to hospitals like Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minn.A ‘gift’ to doctors and nursesThere is also research suggesting that when caregivers know their patients better, those patients have improved health outcomes.One study, for example, found that doctors who scored higher on an empathy test had patients with better-controlled blood sugar. Another study found that in patients with a common cold, the cold’s duration was reduced by nearly a full day for those patients who gave their doctor a top rating for empathy.University of Colorado professor Heather Coats studies the health impact of biographical storytelling. She notes a 2008 study found that radiologists did a more thorough job when they were simply provided a photo of the patients whose scans they were reading.”They improved the accuracy of their radiology read,” Coats says. “Meaning [fewer] misspelled words; a better report that’s more detailed.” Current research is investigating whether storytelling might have a similar effect on clinical outcomes.And, Coats adds, the benefits of the kind of storytelling happening at the VA don’t just accrue to the patients.”I consider it a gift to the nurses and the doctors,” Coats says.A survey of clinicians conducted by the Madison VA backs that up: It showed 85 percent of them thought reading the biographies of patients produced by Thor Ringler’s team of writers was “a good use” of clinical time and also helped them improve patient care.”It gives you a much better understanding about the entirety of their life and how to help them make a decision,” says Dr. Jim Maloney, a VA surgeon who performed Bob Hall’s lung transplant in 2013.That’s critical for doctors like Maloney, because only about half the people who undergo a lung transplant are still alive after five years. Maloney believes knowing more about a patient’s life story makes it easier for the doctor to have difficult but necessary conversations with a patient — to learn, for example, how aggressively to respond if a complication occurs.Maloney says the stories generated by My Life, My Story give the entire transplant team near immediate access to a valuable tool, one that helps them connect quickly with patients and family members, and start conversations about sensitive issues or difficult choices about end-of-life care.Dr. Tamara Feingold-Link has also experienced the power of being able to read a patient’s life story. Now a second-year medical resident at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Feingold-Link first encountered one of the biographies generated by My Life, My Story when she was on rotation at a Boston-area VA. Her attending physician asked her to run a meeting with a patient’s family.”I barely knew the patient, who was so sick he could hardly talk,” Feingold-Link recalls.She noticed his medical record included the patient’s life story, something she had never seen before. She immediately read the story.”It brought me to tears,” she remembers. “When I met his family, I could connect with them immediately.””It made his transfer to hospice much smoother for everyone involved,” she says.Now Dr. Feingold-Link has started a similar program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.Meaningful stories go beyond medical careBob Hall has learned the stories can be meaningful to caregivers even when they’re not working. During one of his stays at the Madison VA, a nursing aide came into his room after she read his life story in his medical record.”She came in one night and sat down on my bed just to talk to me for a while, because she’d read my story,” Hall says. “I found out later she wasn’t on the clock. She just came in after her shift ended to chat for a while.”It’s been 5 years since Hall’s lung transplant, and he’s doing well. He even found a part-time job putting his writing skills to work as part of the My Life, My Story team. In just two years, Hall has written 208 capsule biographies of veterans who come to this hospital for care, just like he did.”Dr. Maloney came to me one day recently, and I was telling him how many stories I’d done,” Halls says, “and he says, ‘You know I think you’ve given more back to the VA with these stories than they gave to you.'””I said, ‘Doctor, I don’t think that’s true, but it’s very kind of you to say so.’ It made me feel good.”This story is part of NPR’s reporting partnership with Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

Its Easier Than Ever to Not Compensate Interns But Theres a Catch

first_img Add to Queue Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Career and Workplace Expert; Founder and President, Come Recommended The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) recently updated its unpaid internship guidelines, and that’s good news for employers. The reason: Under the DOL’s former guidelines, if even one of the six factors it listed wasn’t met, interns were entitled to compensation.Related: 5 Ways Your Small Business Will Benefit From Hiring InternsBut, that’s changed: Now, companies are expected to meet a single central standard (determined by seven factors) to clarify who is the “primary beneficiary” in an unpaid intern-employer relationship. That primary beneficiary, of course, must be the intern.Among those factors are that both parties must understand there is no expectation of compensation or a job offer. And, the company hiring the intern must provide educational training and align that training with the intern’s formal education program and academic calendar.  Regardless of this newer, easier standard, however, unpaid internships remain a complicated subject. John S. Ho, partner and chair of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration practice at law firm Cozen O’Connor’s New York City office, explained just how complicated, saying that, “The analysis [of the primary beneficiary] depends on the unique circumstances of each case, giving businesses more flexibility to make their case that an intern is properly classified based on individual facts.”Here’s how the guidelines have changed and what these changes mean for employers:Both parties can now benefit.The old standard required that employers derive no benefit from the internship. Of course, some unscrupulous employers managed to squeeze valuable, unpaid labor out of their interns.But for the honest ones, the unrealistic former “no benefit” requirement tied companies’ hands and limited the experience that unpaid interns could receive.The new, seven-factor test, however, is more flexible. It allows employers to benefit from the intern’s activities as long as that young person remains the primary beneficiary of the relationship. For that to occur, employers must make sure they:Provide educational, hands-on training.Accommodate the intern’s academic commitments.Complement the work of their paid employees rather than displace them.Conclude the internship once the intern has learned all that he or she can from the experience.Overall, the employer should provide educational experience that meets specific learning objectives set prior to the internship’s start. Providing the intern descriptive materials akin to a university-style curriculum and syllabus might be helpful to ensure that “educational experience.”Related: Stop Delegating Social Media to Your InternsIn addition,employers should meet with their interns reguarly to discuss their progress, ideas and goals. That way, they can provide a more personalized and educational internship experience.   The experience must be good — but not too good.While reviewing a client’s internship program, Joey Price, founder and owner of Jumpstart:HR, LLC, an HR outsourcing and consulting firm in Baltimore, heard multiple negative reviews from interns.The company the interns had gone to work for made sure the interns received daily lunches, solid work experiences and materials. But, the interns’ lack of payment still prevented the program from being a success. The reason was the work’s revenue-generating nature.“I advised my client that any time an ‘intern’ . . . is focused primarily on revenue-generating activity, it is no longer an internship,” Price explained. In essence, the client was teaching interns how to trade, giving them funds to manage and then monitoring the progress of those trades. And this went against the idea of complementing, rather than displacing, the work of paid employees — one of the seven factors in the new unpaid internship guidelines.So, while an intern’s experience with a company should be good, it shouldn’t be so good that it takes the place of paid employees’ work. And that means focusing on the educational aspect of the internship above all else.To do this, Ryan Glasgow, a labor and employment partner at the law firm Hunton & Williams LLP in its Richmond, Va., office, suggested the need to connect internships with college educational programs and the college or university’s system for offering academic credit.Glasgow also said he finds it important for internships to go beyond the work experience offered in the typical office. This could mean adding in classes and educational programs, Glasgow said, so that students receive training in a university-like environment.The DOL internship guidelines aren’t mandatory, but they demand your respect, nonetheless.Because the DOL is not a legislative body, the primary beneficiary intern test it provides is merely a guideline for unpaid internship programs. If there is a grievance, no judge will arbitrate.Despite that fact, said Dan Kalish, the managing partner at law firm HKM Employment Attorneys LLP’s office in Seattle, Wash., leaders should still proceed with caution. “Even if an employer meets the federal test to have an unpaid internship, it is possible that the employer will not meet the state law requirements to have an unpaid internship; and the employer would have to pay the intern in accordance with the state law,” Kalish told me by email.Related: Paying Interns Is a Good Investment In the Future of Your Business To keep small companies safe and both parties happy, therefore, consult an employment lawyer if you have any doubts about your internship program. Then, go out and create a program that will be an unforgettable experience for those students lucky enough to be accepted to it. Image credit: Shutterstock Internships Next Article Contributor 5 min read Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. The days of interns’ long hours and endless coffee runs are hopefully ending, thanks to new federal guidelines. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Heather R. Huhman February 1, 2018 It’s Easier Than Ever to Not Compensate Interns, But There’s a Catch. –shares Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

Yes to yoghurt and cheese New improved Mediterranean diet

first_imgImage Credit: Rimma Bondarenko / Shutterstock Dec 11 2018Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Thousands of Australians can take heart as new research from the University of South Australia shows a dairy-enhanced Mediterranean diet will significantly increase health outcomes for those at risk of cardiovascular disease – and it’s even more effective than a low-fat diet. Cardiovascular disease is the single leading cause of death in Australia, affecting 4.2 million Australians and killing one Australian every 12 minutes. Low-fat diets are often recommended as suitable food plans for those seeking to reduce their risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Similarly, the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) has been shown to deliver significant health benefits.In this UniSA study, published by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers compared the health benefits of a MedDiet supplemented with two to three serves of dairy each day, and a generic low-fat diet.The results show that the dairy-supplemented MedDiet (MedDairy) significantly improved blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterol, mood and cognitive function.PhD candidate Alexandra Wade says the new MedDairy diet challenges popular perceptions of what is considered healthy.“The MedDiet is fast earning a reputation as the world’s healthiest diet and is renowned for delivering improved cardiovascular and cognitive health,” Wade says.“But it’s also higher in fat, which can be a deterrent for people seeking to adopt a healthier eating plan, especially if they don’t realise the difference between healthy and unhealthy fats.“In Australia, low-fat diets are often recommended for improving heart health and they are still perceived as being healthy.“This study shows that the new MedDairy works better than a generic low-fat diet, ensuring better health outcomes for people at risk of cardiovascular disease.”Related StoriesScientists examine hormonal links between diet and obesityLow-carb diet may reverse metabolic syndrome independent of weight lossDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesImportantly, the MedDairy diet also meets additional calcium requirements recommended by Australia’s national health bodies.A typical MedDiet includes extra virgin olive oil, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, wholegrain breads, pastas and cereals, moderate consumption of fish and red wine, and low consumption of red meat, sweet and processed foods. It also includes 1-2 servings of dairy foods (700-820mg calcium), which is less than half the dairy recommended by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) for older Australians.“Living in Australia, we have different dietary requirements, notably a need for more calcium to protect against osteoporosis,” Wade says.“These needs are unmet in the traditional MedDiet, which makes it difficult for people to adopt in the long term.“This study delivers healthier options for Australians by tailoring the nutrients in the MedDiet to meet the needs of a non-Mediterranean population.“In Australia, women up to age 50 years – and men up to age 70 years – should consume 1000mg per day of calcium per day and 1300mg thereafter, which is roughly between 3.5 and 4.5 serves a day.“The new MedDairy diet allows for three to four servings with dairy, which means Australians can more sustainably meet their recommended daily nutrient intakes while also maintaining the significant health benefits offered through the MedDiet.“When it comes down to it, people want to be able to enjoy a colourful, tasty and nutritious diet. And if you’re one of the thousands of people seeking to improve your cardiovascular and cognitive health – look no further than the MedDairy diet.”Notes Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death in Australia, with 43,477 deaths attributed to CVD in Australia in 2017. CVD kills one Australian every 12 minutes. Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics 2018, Causes of Death 2017, ABS cat. no. 3303.0, September. Cardiovascular disease affects one in six Australians or 4.2 million people. Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016, National Health Survey: First results, 2014-15, ABS cat. no. 4364.0.55.001, March. Data customised using TableBuilder. Source: https://www.unisa.edu.aulast_img read more

Researchers identify cause of inherited metabolic disorder

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 16 2019A new study from BC Children’s Hospital, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and an international team of researchers published in the New England Journal of Medicine is the first to identify a rarely-seen type of DNA mutation as the cause of an inherited metabolic disorder.Inherited metabolic disorders — where the body can’t break down specific nutrients from food leading to a range of serious health problems — are often caused by a defective gene.In this important study, researchers found an unusual genetic mutation behind three children’s undiagnosed, degenerative conditions: a repeat expansion of DNA. In this specific mutation, the gene appears undamaged but does not function because the DNA adjacent to it has extended several hundred times its normal length.”To detect this kind of DNA multiplication, you can only use whole genome sequencing and have to search through billions of pieces of DNA; it’s truly a search for the needle in the haystack,” said lead author Dr. Clara van Karnebeek. “With our new approach we have finally solved our mystery cases, and we now expect to find the genetic cause of other, as of yet unexplained, genetic metabolic diseases.”To date, DNA repeat expansions have been linked to approximately 30 different diseases.”For kids with rare diseases and their families, finding the root causes of their disorders is tremendously important,” said Dr. Wyeth Wasserman, a co-author of the study. “A diagnosis gives us the potential to intervene, relieves undeserved parental guilt, and provides insights into more common diseases.”For a child with an unexplained medical condition, a diagnosis lays the groundwork for further research that could lead to new interventions such as gene therapy aimed at “turning on” the impaired gene, dietary modification or supplements that provide the nutrients the body is missing. Effective treatment can slow or stop damaging symptoms, improving the quality of life of children with rare disorders and their families.In this study, initial work by van Karnebeek and her research team narrowed the search for the genetic causes of this rare disorder to key areas of the genome. However, after further investigations using exome sequencing and whole genome sequencing, the international research team couldn’t pinpoint the error in the DNA.Related StoriesMolecular switches may control lifespan and healthspan separately, genetic discovery suggestsFungal infection study identifies specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong peopleResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeIt’s here that researchers at BC Children’s took a novel approach. Through in-depth, manual analysis and the use of emerging bioinformatics tools and techniques study co-authors Dr. Britt Drögemöller and Phillip Richmond discovered and confirmed that the gene responsible for the disorder was intact but a repeat expansion error prevented it from functioning.”In our search, we focused on variations that would have been hard to discover through exome sequencing” said Drögemöller. “After months of experimenting with various different analyses, we finally uncovered this novel genetic variant by using new targeted approaches aimed at identifying DNA repeat expansions.””These findings were made possible by a multidisciplinary approach and advances in technology, techniques and software,” said Richmond. “It wouldn’t have been possible as recently as two years ago and, most importantly, it shows us what to look for in other undiagnosed cases.”The gene identified as the cause of this particular disorder is an enzyme that enables the body to turn an amino acid called glutamine into glutamate. More work is needed to determine how exactly this genetic error leads to disease, but it’s likely that either a build-up of glutamine or the lack of glutamate caused the children’s serious developmental delays and disabilities including difficulty with language, speech, balance and coordination.Through collaborations with sequencing consortiums around the world, researchers were able to confirm that this particular repeat expansion was found in only 1 in 8,000 people, establishing the mutation as very rare.Over one million Canadians suffer from a rare disease and in over 50 per cent of these cases, the underlying genetic cause of the illness remains unknown.”We can do better for children with rare diseases. For the 50 per cent who can’t find answers, this discovery and new approach will help us dig in and potentially find the causes of their disease,” said Richmond. Source:https://www.ubc.ca/last_img read more

How Obamacare Medicare and Medicare for All muddy the campaign trail

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 13 2019The health care debate has Democrats on Capitol Hill and the presidential campaign trail facing renewed pressure to make clear where they stand: Are they for “Medicare for All”? Or will they take up the push to protect the Affordable Care Act?Obamacare advocates have found a powerful ally in House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who in a recent “60 Minutes” appearance said that concentrating on the health law is preferable to Medicare for All. She argued that since the ACA’s “benefits are better” than those of the existing Medicare program, implementing Medicare for All would mean changing major provisions of current Medicare, which covers people 65 and up as well as those with disabilities.This talking point — one Pelosi has used before — seems tailor-made for the party’s establishment. It’s politically palatable among moderates who believe that defending the ACA’s popular provisions, such as protecting coverage for those with preexisting conditions, fueled the Democrats’ House takeover in 2018.Progressive Democrats argue that the time has come to advance a far more disruptive policy, one that guarantees health care to all Americans. Those dynamics were on full display on Capitol Hill, as recently as an April 30 Medicare for All hearing.But this binary view — Medicare (and, for argument’s sake, Medicare for All) versus Obamacare — oversimplifies the issues and distracts from the policy proposals.”It’s sort of a silly argument,” said Robert Berenson, a health policy analyst at the Urban Institute, of Pelosi’s talking point. “She’s trying to argue the Affordable Care Act needs to be defended, and Medicare for All is a diversion.”As the debate continues, one point should be clear: Medicare for All would not look like the ACA or like Medicare today. Instead, it — or any other single-payer system — would drastically change how Americans get health care.Analyzing Medicare Isn’t That Helpful In Understanding ‘Medicare For All’ Proposals.Medicare for All is complicated, analysts noted, and the phrase is often deployed to mean different things, depending on who is speaking.What’s clear is that the “Medicare” described in Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vt.) legislation — the flagship Medicare for All proposal — would create a health program far more generous than traditional Medicare’s current benefit, or even the vast majority of health plans made available through the ACA.Sanders relied heavily on this concept during his 2016 Democratic presidential primary run and recently introduced an updated version in the Senate.To be fair, though, Sanders also sometimes blurs the lines between the programs. In a May 5 appearance on ABC’s “This Week with George Stephanopoulos,” he used existing Medicare as part of his sales pitch: “Medicare right now is the most popular health insurance program in the country,” he said. “But it only applies to people 65 years of age or older. All that I want to do is expand Medicare over a four-year period to cover every man, woman and child in this country.”As counterintuitive as it sounds, understanding Medicare as it works today isn’t helpful in envisioning a Medicare for All plan. Unlike with existing Medicare, the proposed health plan would cover things like nursing home care, vision care and dental services. It would get rid of cost sharing — meaning no premiums, deductibles or copays. (Sanders has acknowledged that financing the program would mean raising taxes.)”It’s not Medicare. It’s something different,” said Ellen Meara, a health economist at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice.But voters may not grasp the differences between the existing Medicare program for seniors and the hypothetical one being discussed. Pelosi’s comments may add to that confusion. Pelosi’s office did not respond to a request for comment.Prioritizing efforts to bolster the ACA based on Medicare’s current benefit package “is convenient and not necessarily compelling,” Berenson said, adding: “No one is proposing the Medicare benefit package would be taken and applied nationally.”Related StoriesMedicare recipients may pay more for generics than their brand-name counterparts, study findsSocial Security error jeopardizes Medicare coverage for 250,000 seniorsMedicare system aimed at improving care, lowering costs may not be having as much impact as thoughtThat said, many of the presidential candidates have advanced far less sweeping health care options that would lower the Medicare age to 55 or allow people to buy in to the current Medicare program — an approach often referred to as a “public option.” Those would keep the program essentially structured as it is today.The Democratic Health Care Debate Is More Complicated Than These Familiar Words Suggest. Every analyst interviewed for this story floated some kind of concern regarding a Medicare for All system. There’s the issue of how people would respond to losing the option of private insurance — a likely consequence of Sanders’ proposal — and the question of what level of tax hikes would be necessary to finance such a system, particularly if it covers a big-ticket item such as long-term care. There are also concerns about the financial impact for hospitals, often large employers in a community, or for the private insurance industry jobs that would likely disappear.Focusing on current Medicare benefits misses the point, suggested Sherry Glied, a health economist and dean at New York University. When debating the merits of the ACA versus Medicare for All, Medicare’s current generosity is kind of a red herring, she said.Plus, making Obamacare or Medicare for All an either-or debate ignores a sizable political bloc: Democrats who say they support the ACA and see single-payer as a next step. That tension is at play with presidential candidates like Kamala Harris, who frame Medicare for All as an ultimate goal, while also backing incremental reforms.Comparing Medicare To Obamacare Is Difficult Since Each Offers Different Benefits To Different People. The problem is that both Medicare and Obamacare are vast programs. Depending on your income, health needs and the version you sign up for, either one could prove the better choice.”It’s impossible to say the ACA as a concept has more or less generous benefits,” Berenson said.Broadly, the ACA has protections in place that traditional Medicare doesn’t. It caps how much patients pay out-of-pocket, and it has more generous coverage of mental health care and substance abuse treatment. But, in practice, those benefits have proved elusive for many since Medicare generally has a more robust network of participating physicians than many of the ACA’s cheaper plans, which restrict patients to a narrower coverage network.Also, most beneficiaries don’t solely have traditional Medicare.About a third use Medicare Advantage, in which private insurance companies construct Medicare plans with benefits and protections based on factors like company, tier and geography. They, too, are often restricted to narrower networks.More than 1 in 5 traditional Medicare beneficiaries also receive Medicaid coverage, according to figures kept by the Kaiser Family Foundation, and about a third of them buy so-called Medigap plans, which are sold by private insurance and are meant to supplement gaps in coverage.The ACA also encompasses an array of coverage options. Which plans are available in an area and whether earnings qualify a consumer for a government subsidy— a tax break meant to make an ACA plan more affordable — make a significant difference in evaluating whether Medicare or an ACA plan offers better benefits for a particular person or family.Suggesting that one is clearly better than the other, Meara said, is a “gross oversimplification.”But that kind of oversimplification may be hard to avoid, especially in a primary season where health care is a top issue.”The Affordable Care Act is also not one thing, the way Medicare is not one thing,” said Katherine Baicker, dean of the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago. “So much of health care is more complicated than we can explain in a sound bite.” This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

Pliable microbatteries for wearables

first_img Flexible batteries a highlight for smart dental aids In its development of batteries for wearables, Fraunhofer IZM combines new approaches and years of experience with a customer-tailored development process: “We work with companies to develop the right battery for them,” explains the graduate electrical engineer. The team consults closely with customers to draw up the energy requirements. They carefully adapt parameters such as shape, size, voltage, capacity and power and combined them to form a power supply concept. The team also carries out customer-specific tests.Smart plaster to measure sweatIn 2018, the institute began work on a new wearable technology, the smart plaster. Together with Swiss sensor manufacturer Xsensio, this EU-sponsored project aims to develop a plaster that can directly measure and analyze the patient’s sweat. This can then be used to draw conclusions about the patient’s general state of health. In any case, having a convenient, real-time analysis tool is the ideal way to better track and monitor healing processes. Fraunhofer IZM is responsible for developing the design concept and energy supply system for the sweat measurement sensors. The plan is to integrate sensors that are extremely flat, light and flexible. This will require the development of various new concepts. One idea, for instance, would be an encapsulation system made out of aluminum composite foil. The researchers also need to ensure they select materials that are inexpensive and easy to dispose of. After all, a plaster is a disposable product. Fabrication of micro batteries with side-by side electrodes on silicon wafer. Credit: Fraunhofer IZM Explore further Success through segmentationRobert Hahn, a researcher in Fraunhofer IZM’s department for RF & Smart Sensor Systems, explains why segmentation is the recipe for success: “If you make a battery extremely pliable, it will have very poor energy density – so it’s much better to adopt a segmented approach.”Instead of making the batteries extremely pliable at the cost of energy density and reliability, the institute turned its focus to designing very small and powerful batteries and optimized mounting technology. The batteries are pliable in between segments. In other words, the smart band is flexible while retaining a lot more power than other smart wristbands available on the market. Citation: Pliable micro-batteries for wearables (2018, October 1) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-pliable-micro-batteries-wearables.html In medicine, wearables are used to collect data without disturbing patients as they go about their daily business – to record long-term ECGs, for instance. Since the sensors are light, flexible and concealed in clothing, this is a convenient way to monitor a patient’s heartbeat. The technology also has more everyday applications – fitness bands, for instance, that measure joggers’ pulses while out running. There is huge growth potential in the wearables sector, which is expected to reach a market value of 72 billion euros by 2020.How to power these smart accessories poses a significant technical challenge. There are the technical considerations – durability and energy density – but also material requirements such as weight, flexibility and size, and these must be successfully combined. This is where Fraunhofer IZM comes in: experts at the institute have developed a prototype for a smart wristband that, quite literally, collects data first hand. The silicone band’s technical piece de resistance is its three gleaming green batteries. Boasting a capacity of 300 milliampere hours, these batteries are what supply the wristband with power. They can store energy of 1.1 watt hours and lose less than three percent of their charging capacity per year. With these parameters the new prototype has a much higher capacity than smart bands available at the market so far, enabling it to supply even demanding portable electronics with energy. The available capacity is actually sufficient to empower a conventional smart watch at no runtime loss. With these sorts of stats, the prototype beats established products such as smart watches, in which the battery is only built into the watch casing and not in the strap. There is a new technology gripping the markets of the future – technology to wear. Wearables, as they are known, are portable systems that contain sensors to collect measurement data from our bodies. Powering these sensors without wires calls for pliable batteries that can adapt to the specific material and deliver the power the system requires. Micro-batteries developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration IZM provide the technical foundation for this new technology trend. Mechanically flexible micro battery stripe made from segmented battery cells. Credit: Fraunhofer IZM Customer-tailored solutions Millimeter-sized lithium-ion batteries with interdigital electrodes. Credit: Fraunhofer IZM, Volker Mai Provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Parag Milk to airlift premium milk brand to DelhiNCR

first_imgLeading private dairy company Parag Milk Foods Ltd expects its farm-to-home brand- Pride of Cows to touch the Rs 200 crore-mark in sales in the next 2-3 years. The company has expanded its distribution to Delhi-NCR.Sold on a subscription-model directly by the company, the premium milk will be airlifted from its dairy farm in Manchar, Pune to cater to the consumers in the Delhi-NCR. So far, the company has been selling the brand to about 34,000 households in Mumbai, Pune and Surat and it has also found traction among celebrities and HNIs.Devendra Shah, Chairman, Parag Milk Foods said, “With the aim to expand the brand’s presence, we have been focusing on increasing the production at our farm. Currently, we have over 3000 Holstien Freisan cows. We believe we have the capacity to cater to 15,000-20,000 households in the Delhi-NCR region in the next one year.”Initially to be made available in South Delhi and Gurgaon region, the company plans to roll out its “by-invitation” subscription model across the Delhi-NCR region in the next few months. “Currently, Pride of Cows is a Rs 80-crore brand. We expect it to grow to about Rs 180- Rs 200 crore in the next 2-3 years,” he said adding that Delhi-NCR is the largest milk market in the country.Priced at Rs 120 per litre in Delhi-NCR, consumers can subscribe to the premium milk on the company’s website or through its app. Shah said, “ In the first six months, we will airlift about 10,000 litres of premium milk from our farm. We only source the milk from our state-of-the-art dairy farm which is equipped with international technology for feeding, milking and processing of fresh milk. We hope to expand this to 20,000 litres in the next six months for the Delhi-NCR region.” To be priced at Rs 120 per litre COMMENT Devendra Shah, Chairman, Parag Milk Foods Ltd. File Photo   –  BusinessLine SHARE SHARE EMAIL Delhi January 17, 2019center_img COMMENTS Published on Parag Milk Foods Ltd SHARE dairy (product)last_img read more

Priyanka meets Azad offers support to his struggles

first_imgMarch 13, 2019 Priyanka Gandhi Vadra COMMENT COMMENTS Amid reports that Bhim Army leader Chandrashekhar Azad will contest against Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Varanasi, Congress general secretary in-charge of Eastern Uttar Pradesh Priyanka Gandhi Vadra met him at a Meerut Hospital on Wednesday. Azad was admitted in hospital after the UP Police arrested him allegedly for violating model code of conduct.Talking to reporters after the meeting, Vadra said no political matters were discussed. When asked whether Azad will be a Congress candidate, she said she did not want to politicise the meeting. “A young man is struggling, he is raising his voice and wants society to hear his problems. This government is so audacious that it tries to repress his voice. It doesn’t want to hear the problems of youth. They have not given any jobs to youth. When they raise their voices, they are repressing it,’ she said and added that she came to express solidarity with Azad.The meeting is significant, particularly after the BSP’s decision to not have any truck with the Congress in the upcoming elections. The Congress, on the other hand, is trying to reach out to other Dalit mobilisations such as the Bhim Army. Congress General Secretary Priyanka Gandhi Vadra visits Bhim Army chief Chandrashekhar Azad at a hospital, in Meerut   –  PTI Indian National Congress SHARE SHARE EMAIL Published on SHARE All India Congress Committee (AICC)last_img read more

Barring fundamentalists Muslims want construction of Ram temple in Ayodhya Ram Vilas

first_imgBarring fundamentalists, Muslims want construction of Ram temple in Ayodhya: Ram Vilas VedantiRam Janmabhoomi Nyas member Ram Vilas Vedanti on Friday claimed barring fundamentalists, the Muslim community supports the idea of construction of a grand Ram temple in Ayodhya.advertisement Next Press Trust of India LucknowJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 22:05 IST Ram Janmabhoomi Nyas member Ram Vilas Vedanti (Image Credit: ANI)Ram Janmabhoomi Nyas member Ram Vilas Vedanti on Friday claimed barring fundamentalists, the Muslim community supports the idea of construction of a grand Ram temple in Ayodhya.”Eighty per cent Muslims, barring the fundamentalists, want that the temple be constructed at the place where Ram Lalla is installed in Ayodhya,” he told media here.”Lucknow,”The chairman of the Shia Waqf Board, Wasim Rizvi has also agreed that Ram temple be built in Ayodhya whereas the mosque can be constructed at any other Shia-majority place in he said.His comments come in the wake of the Supreme Court on Thursday seeking a report on the “progress of mediation” in the politically sensitive case of Ram Janmabhoomi-Babri Masjid land dispute in Ayodhya and said a day-to-day hearing may commence from July 25 if the court decides to conclude those proceedings.Ram Vilas Vedanti, described as working president of Ram Janmabhoomi Nyas, also said there was “nothing in the name of (Mughal ruler) Babur” in Ayodhya and that everything in the city was “in the name of Lord Ram”.”There is not even a locality, lane or ward named after Babar in Ayodhya,” he said.”Muslims need to come forward and say that Hindus should construct their temple in Ayodhya for peace, communal amity and brotherhood,” he said, adding the Sunni Waqf Board should withdraw the case.To a question, Ram Vilas Vedanti, a former BJP MP, said it was most unfortunate that in a country where Hindus constitute “90 per cent” of the population, people are fighting a case in court for the construction of Ram temple.He said no power can build a mosque where Ram Lalla is installed, adding his statement could be either taken as a ‘threat’ or ‘suggestion’.On December 6, 1992, the Babri Masjid, constructed at the disputed site in the 16th century by Shia Muslim Mir Baqi, was demolished.ALSO READ | Ayodhya land title case: SC asks mediation panel to submit report by July 18ALSO WATCH | War over Jai Shri Ram escalates in Bengal, Kumaraswamy seeks floor test, says he govt has numbers; moreFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byKritika Kashyap Tags :Follow Ram Vilas VedantiFollow AyodhyaFollow Ram templeFollow MuslimsFollow Ram Janmabhoomi Nyas Karyashalalast_img read more