October 23 2009 The Different Skies musicians

first_imgOctober 23, 2009 The Different Skies musicians gave a special performance to a group of students from the neighboring ORME School, as well as to a group of 50 students from the Facultad de Arquitectura y Diserto, Extension Ensenada, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California. The students from Ensenada visited Arcosanti for an extensive architectural tour and enjoyed the impromptu liveliness of the music. [photo: Anna Tran & text: hk] 2009 Different Skies participants: [back row from left] Ivan Schwartz, Allen Goodman, Brian Good, Bill Marx, Rus Foster, Jonathan Mills, John Rossi III, Giles Reaves and John Krikawa. [front row from left] Greg Hurley, Bill Fox, Kevin Haller, Mike Metlay, Otso Pakarinen and Tim Walters. The weeks practice sessions culminate into a public performance on Saturday, October 24. 2009. The evening event will start with a complimentary tour at 5 pm, followed by Dinner in the Cafe at 6 pm, and the Concert starts at 7:30 pm. For ticket information call 928 632-7135. [photo & text: hk]last_img read more

UK local TV operation London Live will stop making

first_imgUK local TV operation London Live will stop making and buying entertainment series, and instead focus on news and current affairs programming.Programming execs such as head of programming and commissioning Jonathan Boseley and commissioning executive Derren Lawford – formerly BBC Worldwide’s head of programming and scheduling for the Global iPlayer – will be affected by the decision.They will be “reapportioned” to the London Live’s news and current affairs team, which is planning to create new positions in coming months.London Live, which is part of former culture secretary Jeremy Hunt’s local TV initiative, said a decision to boost news programming would have a “knock-on reduction” to original entertainment commissions and acquired programmes. This would align it closer with sister newspaper the London Evening Standard, itadded.This comes after ESTV, which provides London Live programming, called for media regulator Ofcom to reduce to number of local content the channel must air during peak hours.London Live’s original commissions include Food Junkies, F2 and Drag Queens of London, though the channel has struggled with small viewing figures since launch in March.“I am extraordinarily proud of what Jonathan Boseley and his team have achieved, in record time, and delivered on previously unheard-of tariffs, but I am also excited to take the station in a new editorial direction this autumn that will capitalise on ESI Media’s unique attributes to take the channel from strength to strength into its next season and beyond,” said London Live COO Tim Kirkman.The news is latest blow to Britain’s local TV initiative, coming just eight days after Birmingham’s City TV became the first to collapse and call in administrators.last_img read more

Rob Salter Videoondemand aggregator Vubiquity is

first_imgRob SalterVideo-on-demand aggregator Vubiquity is planning to launch a retail product that will allow consumers to buy digital content, initially movies, in high-street retail outlets in multiple markets.Vubiquity said it is discussion with multiple retailers in a number of different territories about the plan, which would mark its first move into the retail digital space.Vubiquity has hired Rob Salter, formerly CEO of home entertainment supply chain specialist Reverbz Media, to head up the new initiative as vice-president of retail. Vubiquity will use Reverbz to provide the physical supply chain for the service in the retail environment, while Vubiquity will provide digital content services, including content licensing, processing for multiplatform viewing, metadata management, and digital distribution.Vubiquity said the product would enable consumer to purchase digital movies in retail outlets, often weeks before they are available on DVD, Blu-ray or VoD.“We are delighted to have brought Rob to the Vubiquity team. Together we bring a wealth of retail and supply chain management experience giving the credibility to our customers to help shape and deliver these exciting new retail services. We will provide a range of fully integrated, end-to-end services that are very compelling for retailers, content owners and consumers alike,” said Nick Ruczaj, SVP Commercial EMEA at Vubiquity.“Vubiquity has the scale and resources to support the digital retail experience that the market has been calling for a response to for the last 12 months. We are excited to be moving into the delivery phase.”Salter said: “I am thrilled to be working with Vubiquity. We see an excellent opportunity to grow significant business in this channel. Retailers have driven the growth of home entertainment and the building of personal video collections since the first VHS tapes in the mid-1980s. We believe retailers will continue to be a key part of the future of selling video in the digital age. Vubiquity wants to support retailers’ ambitions to go on selling content to their customers in disc form, and also help them go beyond the disc into digital ownership and consumption.”last_img read more

Editors note Doug Casey is known around the worl

first_imgEditor’s note: Doug Casey is known around the world for many very good reasons. Among investors, he’s well known for being a very successful speculator and author. More broadly, his unwavering support of human liberty and his criticism of institutions based on coercion as well as those who support them have made Doug a hero to many… and perhaps public enemy number one to some of those whom he criticizes. Whether one agrees with him or not, Doug almost always has a singular take on issues and ideas, making his essays and talks highly stimulating. As we approach the end of the year – a time when people often reflect on their progress or lack thereof over the past year across all areas of life – this February 2011 interview of Doug Casey by Louis James on the morality of money seems especially trenchant. We hope it helps you reflect on your relationship with money and investing, and brings a renewed sense of clarity and purpose to your financial activities in 2013. Doug Casey on the Morality of Money Interviewed by Casey Research Chief Metals & Mining Investment Strategist Louis James Louis: Doug, every time we have a conversation, I ask you about the investment implications of your ideas, and we consider ways to turn the trends you see into profits. The assumption is that’s what people want to hear from you, since you’re the guru of financial speculation. But this, your known status as a wealthy man, the fact that you have no children, and other things may lead some people to form an incorrect conclusion about you – that “all you care about is money.” So let’s talk about money. Is it all you care about? Doug: I think anyone who has read our conversation giving advice to people just starting out in life (or re-starting) knows that the answer is no. Or the conversation we had in which we discussed Scrooge McDuck, one of the great heroes of literature. However, I have to stop before we start and push back: If money were all I cared about, so what? Would that really make me a bad person? L: I’ve grokked Ayn Rand’s “money speech,” so you know I won’t say yes, but maybe you should expand on that for readers who haven’t absorbed Rand’s ideas… Doug: I’m a huge fan of Rand. She was an original and a genius. But just because someone like her, or me, sees the high moral value of money, that doesn’t mean it’s all-important to us. In fact, I find money less and less important as time goes by, the older I get. Perhaps that’s a function of Maslow’s hierarchy: If you’re hungry, food is all you really care about; if you’re freezing, then it’s warmth; and so forth. If you have enough money, these basics aren’t likely to be problems. My most enjoyable times have had absolutely nothing to do with money. Like a couple times in the past when I hopped freight trains with a friend, once to Portland and once to Sacramento. Each trip took three days and nights, each was full of adventure and weird experiences, and each cost about zero. It was liberating to be out of the money world for a few days. But it was an illusion. Somebody had to get the money to buy the food we ate at missions. Still, it’s nice to live in a dream world for a while. Sure, I’d like more money, if only for the same genetic reason a squirrel wants more nuts to store for the winter. The one common denominator of all living creatures is one word: Survive! And, as a medium of exchange and store of value, money represents survival… it’s much more practical than nuts. L: Some people might say that if money were your highest value, you might become a thief or murderer to get it. Doug: Not likely. I have personal ethics, and there are things I won’t do. Besides, crime – real crime, taking from or harming others, not law-breaking, which is an entirely different thing – is for the lazy, short-sighted, and incompetent. In point of fact, I believe crime doesn’t pay, notwithstanding the fact that Jon Corzine of MF Global is still at large. Criminals are self-destructive. Anyway, what’s the most someone could take, robbing their local bank? Perhaps $10,000? That’s only enough to make a wager with Mitt Romney. But that leads me to think about the subject. In the old days, when Jesse James or other thieves robbed a bank, all the citizens would turn out to engage them in a gun battle in the streets. Why? Because it was actually their money being stored in the bank, not the bankers’ money. A robbed bank had immense personal consequences for everyone in town. Today, nobody gives a damn if a bank is robbed. They’ll get their money back from a US government agency. The bank has become impersonal; most aren’t locally owned. And your deposit has been packaged up into some unfathomable security nobody is responsible for. The whole system has become corrupt. It degrades the very concept of money. This relates to why kids don’t save coins in piggy banks anymore – it’s because they’re no longer coins with value; they’re just tokens that are constantly depreciating and essentially worthless. All of US society is about as sound as the dollar now. Actually, it can be argued that robbing a bank isn’t nearly as serious a crime today as robbing a candy store of $5. Why? Nobody in particular loses in the robbery of today’s socialized banks. But the candy merchant has to absorb the $5 loss personally. Anyway, if you want to rob a bank today, you don’t use a gun. You become part of management and loot the shareholders through outrageous salaries, stock options, and bonuses, among other things. I truly dislike the empty suits that fill most boardrooms today. But most people are mostly honest – it’s the 80/20 rule again. So, no, I think this argument is a straw man. The best way to make money is to create value. If I personally owned Apple as a private company, I’d be making more money – completely honestly – than many governments… and they are the biggest thieves in the world. L: No argument. Doug: Notice one more thing: making money honestly means creating something other people value, not necessarily what you value. The more money I want, the more I have to think about what other people want, and find better, faster, cheaper ways of delivering it to them. The reason someone is poor – and, yes, I know all the excuses for poverty – is that the poor do not produce more than they consume. Or if they do, they don’t save the surplus. L: The productive make things other people want: Adam Smith’s invisible hand. Doug: Exactly. Selfishness, in the form of the profit motive, guides people to serve the needs of others far more reliably, effectively, and efficiently than any amount of haranguing from priests, poets, or politicians. Those people tend to be profoundly anti-human, actually. L: People say money makes the world go around, and they are right. Or as I tell my students, there are two basic ways to motivate and coordinate human behavior on a large scale: coercion and persuasion. Government is the human institution based on coercion. The market is the one based on persuasion. Individuals can sometimes persuade others to do things for love, charity, or other reasons, but to coordinate voluntary cooperation society-wide, you need the price system of a profit-driven market economy. Doug: And that’s why it doesn’t matter how smart or well-intended politicians may be. Political solutions are always detrimental to society over the long run, because they are based on coercion. If governments lacked the power to compel obedience, they would cease to be governments. No matter how liberal, there’s always a point at which it comes down to force – especially if anyone tries to opt out and live by their own rules. Even if people try that in the most peaceful and harmonious way with regard to their neighbors, the state cannot allow separatists to secede. The moment the state grants that right, every different religious, political, social, or even artistic group might move to form its own enclave, and the state disintegrates. That’s wonderful – for everybody but the parasites who rely on the state (which is why secession movements always become violent). I’m actually mystified at why most people not only just tolerate the state but seem to love it. They’re enthusiastic about it. Sometimes that makes me pessimistic about the future… L: Reminds me of the conversation we had on Europe disintegrating. But let’s stay on topic. So you’re saying that money is a positive moral good in society because the pursuit of it motivates the creation of value. It’s the bridge between selfishness and social good, and it’s the basis for voluntary cooperation, rather than coerced interaction. Anything else? Doug: Yes, but first, let me say one more thing about the issue of selfishness – the virtue of selfishness – and the vice of altruism. Ayn Rand might never forgive me for saying this, but if you take the two concepts – ethical self-interest and concern for others – to their logical conclusions, they are actually the same. It’s in your selfish best interest to provide the maximum amount of value to the maximum number of people – that’s how Apple became the giant company it is. Conversely, it is not altruistic to help other people. I want all the people around me to be strong and successful. It makes life better and easier for me if they’re all doing well. So it’s selfish, not altruistic, when I help them. To weaken others, to degrade them by making them dependent upon generosity, as we discussed in our conversation on charity, is not doing those people any good. If you really care about others, the best thing you can do for them is to push for totally freeing all markets. That makes it both necessary and rewarding for them to learn valuable skills and to become creators of value and not burdens on society. It’s a win-win all around. L: That’ll bend some people’s minds… So, what was the other thing? Doug: Well, referring again to our conversation on charity, the accumulation of wealth is in and of itself an important social as well as a personal good. L: Remind us. Doug: The good to individuals of accumulating wealth is obvious, but the social good often goes unrecognized. Put simply, progress requires capital. Major new undertakings, from hydropower dams to spaceships, to new medical devices and treatments, require huge amounts of capital. If you’re not willing to extract that capital from the population via the coercion of taxes, i.e., steal it, you need wealth to accumulate in private hands to pay for these things. In other words, if the world is going to improve, we need huge pools of capital, intelligently invested. We need as many “obscenely” rich people as possible. L: Right then… so, money is all good – nothing bad about it at all? Doug: Unfortunately, many of the rich people in the world today didn’t get their money by real production. They got it by using political connections and slopping at the trough of the state. That’s bad. When I look at how some people have gotten their money – Clinton, Pelosi, and all the politically connected bankers and brokers, just for a start – I can understand why the poor want to eat the rich. But money itself isn’t the problem. Money is just a store of value and a means of exchange. What is bad about that? Gold, as we’ve discussed many times, happens to be the best form of money the market has ever produced: It’s convenient, consistent, durable, divisible, has intrinsic value (it’s the second-most reflective and conductive metal, the most nonreactive, the most ductile, and the most malleable of all metals), and can’t be created out of thin air. Those are gold’s attributes. People attribute all sorts of other silly things to gold, and poetic critics talk about the evils of the lust for gold. But it’s not the gold itself that’s evil – it’s the psychological aberrations and weaknesses of unethical people that are the problem. The critics are fixating on what is merely a tool, rather than the ethical merits or failures of the people who use the tool and are responsible for the consequences of their actions. L: Sort of like the people who repeat foolish slogans like “guns kill” – as though guns sprout little feet when no one is looking and run around shooting people all by themselves. Doug: Exactly. They’re the same personality type – busybodies who want to enforce their opinions on everyone else. They’re dangerous and despicable. Yet they somehow posture as if they had the high moral ground. L: OK, so even if you cared only for money, that could be seen as a good thing. But you do care for more – like what? Doug: Well, money is a tool – the means to achieve various goals. For me, those goals include fine art, wine, cars, homes, horses, cigars, and many other physical things. But it also gives me the ability to do things I enjoy or value – like spend time with friends, go to the gym, lie in the sun, read books, and do pretty much what I want when I want. Let’s just call it as philosophers do: “the good life.” It’s why my partners and I built La Estancia de Cafayate [in Argentina]. We have regular events down there I welcome readers to attend. But I don’t take money too seriously. It’s just something you have. It’s much less important than what you do, and trivial in comparison to what you are. I could be happy being a hobo. As I said in the conversation on fresh starts, there have been times when I felt my life was just as good and I was just as happy without much money at all. That said, you can’t be too rich or too thin. L: Very good. Investment implications? Doug: This may all seem rather philosophical, but it’s actually extremely important to investors. What is the purpose of investing or speculating? To make money. How can anyone hope to do that well if they feel that there is something immoral or distasteful about making money? Someone who pinches his or her nose and tries anyway because making money is a necessary evil will never do as well as those who throw themselves into the fray with gusto and delight in doing something valuable – and doing it well. L: The law of attraction. Doug: Yes, but I don’t view the law of attraction as a metaphysical force – rather as a psychological reality. If you have a negative attitude about something, you’re unlikely to attract it… even if you try to talk yourself into thinking the opposite. L: OK, but that’s not a stock pick… Doug: Sure. We’re talking basics here. No stock picks today, just a Public Service Announcement: If you think money is evil, don’t bother trying to accumulate wealth. On the other hand, if you want to become wealthy, you’d better think long and hard about your attitudes about money, work through the thoughts above and those you can find in the rest of our conversations… Cultivate a positive attitude about money, which is right up there with language as one of the most valuable tools man has ever invented. Think about it, and give yourself permission to become rich. It’s a good thing. L: Very well. Thanks for what I hope will prove to be a very thought-provoking conversation! Doug: My pleasure. Talk to you next week. A successful investing strategy requires much more than choosing the right stocks: it requires an understanding of cultural, political, and economic trends as well as being able to analyze a sector and the companies in it. Doug Casey’s decades of successful speculation show that he’s “the real deal” – and now you can have deeper access into his mind, in one convenient location. Doug has recently written a book, Totally Incorrect, which offers his thoughts and investment implications on topics as wide-ranging as NASA, paying taxes, ethics, why college education is a waste of resources, the immorality of voting, and much more. It’s available as an e-book as well as in physical format – get all the details here.last_img read more

In This Issue Dollar rebounds on first day af

first_imgIn This Issue. * Dollar rebounds on first day after April. * Greece appears to have blinked first. * U.K. election this week, so far it’s a toss up * Zero Hedge points out manipulation.And Now. Today’s A Pfennig For Your Thoughts.Is The IMF Greasing The Tracks?Good day.. And a Marvelous Monday to you! May the Fourth be with you. HA!  Whew! I’m worn out from the Baseball games this past weekend, which featured a sweep of the Pirates, and 3 consecutive extra inning walk off wins! Classic, old-school, baseball with two teams evenly matched, and both waiting for the other team to blink. All the kids were over yesterday, as I fired up the Big Green Egg, and we watched the game together, except the end. Everyone had given up, except darling daughter Dawn, and Dad, we watched the walk off home run and then rubbed it in to the rest who had gone inside! HA! Speaking of waiting for a team to blink. Chris sent me a note on Friday, saying, “Sounds like Greece blinked first”, and he forwarded an article that talked about some concessions that Greece had agreed to, so that they could remain in the euro. This is the first step of kicking the can down the road for the Eurozone and Greece. Chris added: “Not that the stare down is over, but certainly sounds like the Greek leaders are realizing they need to stay in the euro”.  Yes, it sure does. The “concessions” haven’t led to a euro rally though. The euro’s April rally ended with the month, and May is looking as though it will be a tough row to hoe for the euro, or at least it looks that way from the start.  As I kept reminding you during the April rally, which actually ended up being the best month for the euro since 2010, came about from all the weak data in the U.S., it wasn’t about anything good going on in the Eurozone. And with April behind us now, Traders are thinking that the data here in the U.S. is going to begin to look better.. Why would they think that? Because the Fed told them last week that it was going to get better.  I’m not buying whatever it is they are selling, folks. I’m from Missouri, they are going to have to show me! And I get all creeped out, thinking that these guys (Traders) are all hanging their hats on the Jobs Jamboree that will take place at the end of the week on Friday. Let me put it this way. I have NO DOUBTS, the jobs numbers will be better in April than they were in March. And that’s all I’ll say about that now. While I’m on the subject of U.S. Data. Remember when I told you Friday that the U.S. ISM Manufacturing index was going to print for April that day, and it would be the first test to see if the Fed’s call that the very weak 1st QTR was just “Transitory” was fact or fiction.  I also told you the consensus was for this data to stop the trend toward weaker prints each month. Well, guess what? The April ISM was 51.5, same as March’s number. So no increase,  no change that would make one think the 1st QTR was just “Transitory”.  yes, you could say, but, Chuck, it didn’t fall again.  and I would say yes, but it also didn’t rise, which makes me believe the manufacturing sector is just muddling along. The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) will meet tonight (tomorrow for them) and make a rate decision. I still don’t believe Australia needs a rate cut. Granted I’m not there, and my view from the cheap seats is from thousands of miles away. But the RBA is going to take the “Everybody else is doing it” approach, and probably cut rates this evening. The Aussie dollar (A$) hit 80-cents last week, and that level has proved to be much like the star that shines the brightest before it burns out, and it was right after hitting 80-cents that Traders began talking about a rate cut by the RBA. Hmmm. I wonder where they got that idea? You don’t think the RBA whispered sweet nothings into the ears of the Traders do you? Nah, that wouldn’t happen. would it? I don’t doubt it for a minute that it happened just like that, for the RBA saw the A$ 5-cents away from the 75-cents figure they’ve stated that would like to see the A$ trade, and decided they had better do something.  Of course I don’t know that to be fact. Just an observation, like I said. So, May is starting off in the U.S. dollar’s favor, even after the week before IMM Positions report showed the biggest drop in long U.S. dollar contracts since the week leading up to the March FOMC. 35,000 contracts were cut last week, with the biggest beneficiary to the cut going to the euro, where net short contracts were cut back by 17,000. the pound sterling and Mexican peso were the only currencies that saw their net short positions increased! And that makes sense given the U.K. election is this week, and it’s still up in the air as to who will win, and if they do, they probably won’t be able to form a coalition government. And we’ve talked about unknowns being bad for currencies for as long as I’ve been writing this letter, which is in its 23rd year. The Chinese renminbi/ yuan was weakened a bit overnight, stopping the string of appreciation that took place last week.  I have to tell you that The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is reporting that the IMF is close to declaring China’s renminbi / yuan to be fairly valued for the first time in more than a decade.. The WSJ says that “this will be a milestone in the country’s efforts to open its economy that would blunt U.S. criticism of Beijing’s currency policy”.   Sounds like the IMF is greasing the tracks to include the renminbi / yuan in the SDR’s, like I’ve been talking about. For the IMF has not been a fan of Beijing’s currency management in the past. China must be exerting a lot of power here folks. They very badly want the renminbi / yuan included in the SDR’s for that would be a major step toward them removing the dollar as the reserve currency, which has been their plan for quite a few years now. I was writing and doing weekly videos to subscribers of the Currency Capitalist monthly newsletter published by the Sovereign Society in 2008, when I first began to notice and write about China’s Currency Swap agreements, which they had signed with most of the Asian countries and Belarus when I first noticed what was going on, so let’s say, it was 2006 that they began this quest. I first told the audience in Orlando at the Money Show, in 2010, that I thought the renminbi would remove the dollar as the reserve currency by the end of the decade. So we are now ½-through the decade, and look at all the progress the Chinese have made in 5 years? I don’t talk about the dollar losing the reserve status flippantly either. I also tell audiences that to lose the reserve status is a devastating thing to a country. I always refer back to, as a kid, watching the Beatles the first time on the Ed Sullivan show, and how they showed us pictures from the Beatles home town of Liverpool, and how depressing those pictures looked. That was the U.K. economy after being stripped of the reserve status for the pound that took place first in the 1920’s but got it back when the U.S. went through the stock crash and depression, only to lose the reserve status for good after WWII. It took the U.K. 50 years to recover from the loss of the reserve status, and it was only because Richard Nixon took the U.S. off the Gold standard, with everyone else eventually following, and the great rise in Credit (read debt) took place for the G-7 countries. The Canadian dollar / loonie experienced a nice rally in April too, which was ½- generated by weak U.S. data, and the other ½-generated by the brighter outlook by the Bank of Canada (BOC) early in April allowed the loonie to have the best one-month performance VS the dollar in 6 years! The problem with that brighter outlook, is that it was all based on a weaker loonie, which was helping exports. It was a real conundrum for BOC Gov Poloz. If he talks glowingly about the economy, which makes him look good, the loonie rallies, which is NOT what he wants to see happen. This Friday, as with most Fridays when the U.S. has  a Jobs Jamboree Canada also prints their jobs report for the previous month. The thing I want to point out here is something I’ve told you ever since Poloz became the Gov of the BOC. And that is he is from the Trade side of the Gov’t. and those people are born and raised to complain about currency strength. So, I don’t think the loonie has much chance to add to its 5% gain in April, for Poloz will not allow that to happen. Well, I just had to stop and sing along with Leon Russell, and his song: Back to the Island. And watch the sun go down. Hear the sea roll in.. But I’ll be thinking of you.. And how it might have been. Ok. I’m back now. And it appears that the only currencies gaining VS the dollar today are Gold and Silver. And I wouldn’t exactly call Gold’s move a strong move higher. Zerohedge.com ran a pretty interesting story on Friday, and included some really cool screen shots of trading in Gold.  Here’s a snippet of the whole piece. “Much to our dismay, overnight we learned that while the CFTC continues to be very, very confused and challenged by all those lobby payments by the world’s “liquidity providing” HFTs and ignores all documented evidence of manipulation, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange – owner of the futures exchange where the bulk of modern manipulation takes place – did read this evidence of manipulation, and decided to immediately take action, suspending two traders for placing the manipulative “spoofing and layering” trades profiled here three days ago which were virtually identical to the ones that got Navinder Singh Sarao into headlines around the world last week. Except, of course, the asset class manipulated was gold. And, perhaps what’s far worse, the manipulation sent the price of gold briefly higher.” You should read the whole article here. that is as long as you believe in the price manipulation of Gold & Silver. I know that some of you don’t believe it, so You can go ahead move along for these are not the droids you’re looking for. http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-05-01/gold-manipulator-busted-after-zero-hedge-report-hft-gold-spoofing The U.S. Data Cupboard on Friday had the aforementioned ISM, but it also had some very disturbing Construction Spending data from APRIL!  So new data that goes toward the 2nd QTR GDP. April Construction Spending fell -.6% , and get this. The Atlanta Fed cut their 2nd QTR GDP outlook to .8%, after seeing the color of the Construction Spending data. This was the worst print here since 2009, when the Fed began QE1.  In fact 7 of the last 10 months this data has missed  expectations. Today, we have Factory Orders For March. And quite frankly, now that the Fed has put all their eggs into the basket of the next two month’s data I don’t care about March prints. I will be keeping score on April and May data. and so far, we had a no gain ISM and a disastrous Construction Spending in April. To Recap. It appears that April’s currency rally has run into a road block for May, as the dollar is rebounding against all currencies this morning. Traders are buying into the Fed’s call that the bad 1st QTR Data was “Transitory” and will be better in the 2nd QTR, and trading the dollar accordingly.  I wonder what will happen when they wake up and smell the fact that the 2nd QTR Data isn’t “better”.   The U.K. election is this week, still no real  clear winner or party. the WSJ is reporting that the IMF is about to say China’s currency is fair valued. And Gold & Silver have small gains VS the dollar today Then There Was This. I thought you might like to see how the U.S. economy is looked at by someone outside of the U.S.  The U.K. Telegraph.  You can read the whole article here: but I have a couple of snippets that tell the story first.   http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/11578200/US-jobs-relapse-raises-fresh-doubts-on-Fed-tightening.html “A key indicator of manufacturing jobs in the US has dropped to its lowest level since the financial crisis as industry remains stuck in the doldrums, dashing hopes for a swift rebound after the economy ground to a halt in the first quarter. The surprisingly weak data greatly reduce any likelihood the US Federal Reserve will raise rates in June for the first time in eight years, once again putting off the long-feared turning point in the global monetary cycle and perhaps offering another reprieve for dollar debtors across the world. The closely watched index of the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) remained anemic in April, confirming fears that the strong US dollar and energy crash in the once-booming shale states are taking a serious toll. The employment component dropped sharply to 48.3, below the “boom-bust line” of 50 and the lowest in almost six years. The relapse is likely to set off alarm bells at the Fed, where chairman Janet Yellen pays very close attention to the labor market.” Chuck again. See? It’s not just me that sees these things. But why doesn’t the Fed see them? Only the shadow knows, I guess. Currencies today 5/4/15. American Style: A$ .7830, kiwi .7525, C$ .8240, euro 1.1135, sterling 1.5095, Swiss $1.0685, . European Style: rand 12.0590, krone 7.5980, SEK 8.3805, forint 272.45, zloty 3.6305, koruna 24.5690, RUB 51.87, yen 120.25, sing 1.3330, HKD 7.7530, INR 63.42, China 6.1165, pesos 15.56, BRL 3.0770, Dollar Index 95.53, Oil $59.43, 10-year 2.13%, Silver 16.29, Platinum $1,132.63, Palladium $775.75, and Gold. $1,182.21 That’s It For today. Well that was an exciting Kentucky Derby race on Saturday wasn’t it?  Yes, the favorite horse won, that’s why he was the favorite! My wife came back home on Saturday, and the first thing she said upon arriving at the house was that the grass hadn’t been cut. I tried to explain to her that I had been very sick all week, but she was having none of those excuses! See how badly she treats me? HAHAHAHA!  Well, Tomorrow is the Cinco de Mayo Celebration, that I think gets more attention here in the U.S. than in Mexico. Tomorrow I’ll tell you about the famous email I received years ago, on Cinco de Mayo.  Well, my beloved Cardinals are off to their best start since 1944 (they won the World Series that year!)  And now the upstart, kids from Chicago come to town. Appropriately named the Cubs, this team is a collection of high draft choices and trades, to form a good young team. Woke up this morning with a mouth full of blood, from the tumor in my jaw. It’s shrinking again, which is what causes the bleeding. UGH! But I’m fine now, had my breakfast, and I’m good to go!  So, now you have to promise that you’ll go out and make this a Marvelous Monday! Chuck Butler Managing Director EverBank Global Marketslast_img read more

Recommended Link

first_imgRecommended Link   Year 53.7   Year 20190.0 Justin’s note: Today’s essay comes from our good friend and colleague Chris Mayer.If you’ve never heard of Chris, he’s one of the best value investors on the planet. His proprietary investment strategy outperformed not only the S&P 500, but also legendary investors like Warren Buffett, Carl Icahn, John Paulson, and David Einhorn for 10 years straight.In short, when he offers advice, we listen. Below, Chris reveals the three signs he looks for when searching for 100-baggers (stocks that return 100-to-1), even when the broad market is overvalued like it is today… By Chris Mayer, editor, Chris Mayer’s FocusThere’s one question I get from readers over and over again…Why invest in stocks if the world is going to pot?I’m going to cite one piece of remarkable evidence I uncovered in my own massive study of the stock market’s biggest winners.I call these winners “100-baggers” (stocks that returned 100-to-1). And after spending three years and $138,000 to investigate them, I discovered they all have certain aspects in common.I’ll tell you about those attributes in a moment. For now, let’s agree that there is plenty to worry about. And the stock market is not cheap.The S&P 500’s CAPE ratio (a stock valuation measure designed to smooth out earnings volatility) has only been this high one other time in the last century—right before the dot-com crash of 2000. That means many stocks are expensive.But just because a stock market index like the S&P is pricey doesn’t mean there aren’t good values out there. Unless you are a buyer of the index itself, it is not relevant to the business of finding great stocks today.Let me give you a historical example: 1966 to 1982.This 17-year stretch was dead money for stocks—or what so many people would have you believe. The Dow Jones Industrial Average basically went nowhere. And if you factor in the period’s high inflation, the performance was even worse. Thus, you might conclude you didn’t want to be in stocks. — Revealed for the first time ever on Camera: Chris Mayer’s “Secret Weapon”?You may not recognize this man… But he’s a former analyst at Peter Schiff’s New York brokerage firm… a former CPA at Deloitte… and a former analyst of special micro-cap investment firm, Sidoti & Company… Now, he works for Chris Mayer… Just three of his most recent ideas could have made you gains of 108.9%, 120.3% and 116%… all in less than 16 weeks! And now, for the first time, he is going to publicly share three ideas on camera that could make you a considerable amount of money in the next 12 months. Details here.   Year 1013.8 — It’s really just a matter of scale.McDonald’s did about $25 billion in sales last year. So if it wants to double that number, it would need to sell an extra 5 billion Big Macs next year. Granted, this is an oversimplified example, but you get the idea.But it’s not as hard for a small company to increase its sales by double, triple, or more.Not all small companies become big companies, of course. But after studying over 360 100-baggers, I have a basic few clues to look for.The ability to expand into national and/or international markets. Think about the three big winners above. You had a small tax preparer, airline, and retailer. All three started as local, or regional, businesses. And all three grew into national brands. To get those big returns, even in lousy economic environments, you need to have room to grow.Strong returns on the capital invested in the business. If you invest $100 in a business and it generates a cash profit of $20, that’s a 20% return on equity, or ROE. You don’t need to know a lot about finance to know that is a very good return.Well, nearly all of the stocks in my 100-bagger study were good businesses by this measure. They earned returns of 20% and above.H&R Block, for example, earned astronomical returns on its equity—in the early days, especially. ROEs were well over 30% in most years. For L Brands, ROE was over 25% for years and years. And low-cost Southwest had—and still has—among the best economics of any airline.Which brings me to the final—and perhaps most important—clue I’ll share with you today…The ability to reinvest profits and earn high returns again and again and again. This one is just math. If you can earn 30% on your equity and reinvest your profits and earn 30% again… well, the dollars start to pile up real fast.Take a look:   Year 11.3 Recommended Link But here’s what my research on 100-baggers found: There were 187 stocks you could’ve bought between 1966 and 1982 that would have multiplied your money 100 times.In fact, during that 17-year stretch, you’d have had at least a dozen opportunities each month to multiply your money 100x if you just held on.In some cases, you didn’t even have to wait very long. Southwest Airlines returned more than 100 times in about 10 years beginning in 1971. Leslie Wexner’s L Brands (owner of Victoria’s Secret, among other retail properties) did it in about eight years starting in 1978. In 1966, you could’ve bought H&R Block and turned a $10,000 investment into $1 million in under two decades.So, the indexes can tell you what kind of environment you are in. But they don’t predict what will happen to individual stocks.It’s certainly harder to find great opportunities in highly priced markets. And it’s easier to find big winners at market bottoms (but perhaps not so easy as to make yourself buy them, as fear is rife at such times). These facts should surprise no one.However, my point is simply this: Don’t fret so much with guesses as to where the stock market might go. Keep looking for those 100-baggers.If history is any guide, they are always out there…All 100-Baggers Have This in CommonAs I mentioned above, companies such as Southwest Airlines, L Brands, and H&R Block have returned more than 100 times to investors during a period when the broader market went absolutely nowhere.And there is something these three companies had in common:Southwest recorded $6 million in sales in 1972. By 1975, it did $23 million in sales. And by the end of the decade, it hit $200 million in sales.L Brands had sales of $210 million in 1978. It hit $1 billion in sales in 1980. By the end of the 1980s, it hit $5 billion in sales.H&R Block did just $14 million in sales in 1967. In 1975, it passed the $100 million mark in sales.See a pattern here?All three were small companies with lots of room to grow.For larger companies, the condition of the economy can be a constraint. They depend on broad-based economic growth. It is hard for Coca-Cola or McDonald’s to grow faster than the overall economy. They’re just so big already. ATTENTION Seniors: Mark October 19th on Your Calendar!If you put your name on this list of recipients before October 19th… You could be entitled to a deposit up to $1,720 or more! It’s all thanks to a little-known contract between the Social Security Administration and the private sector. Click here for the details. After 10 years, you’ll have 14 times what you started with. After about 18 years, you’ll have a 100-bagger. This is how you power through bad economic times.Finally, there is a great Charlie Munger quote I want to share because it shows you the importance of this concept of ROE:Over the long term, it’s hard for a stock to earn a much better return than the business which underlies it earns. If the business earns 6% on capital over 40 years and you hold it for that 40 years, you’re not going to make much different than a 6% return—even if you originally buy it at a huge discount. Conversely, if a business earns 18% on capital over 20 or 30 years, even if you pay an expensive looking price, you’ll end up with a fine result.So there you have it. Even though the overall market looks expensive, remember that you are not buying the market. You’re buying individual stocks.That’s why you should look for great small-cap stocks with the traits I’ve shared above.If you find a business that can earn 25% or so on its capital over many years, what happens to the overall market won’t matter.Regards,Chris MayerEditor, Chris Mayer’s FocusP.S. Some of the world’s best investors email me ideas… But until now, I haven’t been able to share them with you.Now, for the first time, I’m preparing to share three of these ideas from my private network… And I’m so convinced they’ll pay off for you, I’m putting $5 million on the line to prove it. Click here to learn more…Reader MailbagToday, a reader writes in with a question regarding our recent essay on the marijuana boom. It’s something you might even be wondering yourself…If marijuana really becomes a big business, it will be taken over by the cigarette companies who are in the best position to market it on a large scale. It would be hard for a small company to compete with them.Justin’s note: This reader is absolutely correct. When marijuana’s legalized at the federal level, big tobacco will go after marijuana profits. Big alcohol and big pharma will also fight for slices of the pie.But that shouldn’t stop you from investing in marijuana. If anything, this is a reason to buy marijuana stocks now. Casey Research founder Doug Casey explained why in the October issue of The Casey Report:My guess is that as cannabis becomes fully legal in all its forms in the years to come, that big food and drug companies will take over the leading players—at a big premium. When you’re a big company, it’s much cheaper and easier to buy expertise and production than to make all the usual—and numerous and inevitable—mistakes trying to get in at the ground floor. Someday—not far in the future—you’ll see a takeover mania in the area.You’ll obviously want to own marijuana stocks before this “takeover mania” begins.You can learn about the top marijuana stocks by watching this new presentation. As you’ll see, the best marijuana money-making opportunity isn’t in the United States. It’s north of the border, in Canada. To learn why, check out this free video. You Don’t Want to Miss This…From November 6–10, Doug Casey, Crisis Investing editor Nick Giambruno, and Casey Report editor E.B. Tucker will gather together with a group of close friends at one of the most unique places in the world: Doug’s world-class residential community in Argentina—La Estancia de Cafayate.As a reader of the Dispatch, we’d like to invite you to join.This is not an investment conference—far from it. It’s friends gathering at a place built for like-minded people.There’ll be great steaks, locally produced wine, and probably a few too many Cuban cigars. We’ll discuss what’s going on in the world, and what’s around the bend.This is a unique chance to spend a few days with great people in one of the world’s most beautiful settings. If you haven’t seen the high desert of Argentina, please consider joining us.Keep in mind, space is limited and spots are filling up quickly. So if you’re interested, don’t wait to sign up.To get more details, just send us an email using this link. We hope to see you at La Estancia de Cafayate November 6–10.last_img read more

Justins note Today inhouse commodities expert

first_imgJustin’s note: Today, in-house commodities expert Dave Forest shares the details behind his Casey Cost Curve system… and the two key metals it’s flashing buy signals on today.As you’ll see, these are two metals to own in addition to gold in the months ahead. And the window to get in is quickly closing…Justin: Dave, thank you for taking the time to speak with me again. During our last conversation, you mentioned how you see a financial crisis on the horizon. You also mentioned how gold is the number one metal to own heading into, during, and after a crash.Is that the only commodity you like these days?Dave: Right, so we’re kind of in “protective mode” right now. But that doesn’t mean that we’re avoiding all other commodities.I say this because two commodities really stand out right now in our Casey Cost Curve system. Simply put, Casey Cost Curves tell us how much it costs for mines around the world to produce a commodity. When commodity prices are near or below the cost curve, it’s a buy signal… meaning that producers are making little or no profit – and thus prices need to rise in order to preserve supply.Justin: And what two commodities stand out?Dave: Platinum and uranium… but for different reasons. So I’ll start with platinum.Right now, more than half of the platinum mines in the world aren’t profitable. It’s very rare for a metal’s price to be so depressed that half the industry is not making money. But it’s because about 70% of the world’s platinum comes from South Africa.And South Africa, as you know, is having all kinds of problems. It’s plagued by labor issues, high-power costs, and government legislation.South Africa’s mines are also generally old and exceptionally deep (up to a few kilometers in some cases). Not only that, mining costs here are on the rise – at a time when platinum prices are at a historic low.When you add it all up, it’s basically a powder keg for one of the world’s key metals. “I Will Not Apologize” (Notice Of Termination)Like it or not, this Wall Street legend has the ultimate unfair advantage in the market… and routinely spots the markets fastest-growing stocks – up to 30 days in advance.On January 24th, an obscure semiconductor company named Xilinx (XLNX) was the #1 stock on the Nasdaq… he spotted it over a month in advance.Last August 10th, The Trade Desk (TTD) was the Nasdaq’s #1 stock. He spotted it on July 27th — exactly two weeks earlier.And Paycom Software (PAYC) rose to the top of the NYSE, the world’s largest stock exchange. He recommended it to readers 20 days before it soared.And like it or not, his publisher is pulling his groundbreaking presentation offline on April 30th at midnight. Recommended Link Click here now or miss out Justin: A recipe for higher prices?Dave: Absolutely.We have a world-class platinum company in our International Speculator portfolio.I’m also looking to add more platinum positions. The challenge is that there aren’t very many platinum companies on Earth, and most are in South Africa.The two other major platinum-producing countries are Russia and Zimbabwe. And neither is an A-grade investment destination, either.So it’s not exactly easy to speculate on platinum. But we’re keeping a close eye on the situation.Justin: What about uranium? What makes it stand out?Dave: So uranium is also pretty attractive on the cost curve.Like platinum, most uranium companies are losing money. Even Cameco, the world’s largest public uranium producer, has been shutting down mines due to low prices. Not only that, it’s shutting down some of the world’s lowest-cost mines, like McArthur River.When an industry’s lowest-cost mines are shutting down due to low prices, you know the situation is pretty dire. That makes uranium interesting.We’ve kept our uranium positions for that reason… and we’ve actually added a few more, including one of the only uranium producers based in the U.S. We think it will do really well.Justin: And what if there’s a financial crisis? How should uranium fare?Dave: Uranium demand is pretty steady, regardless of the financial environment. After all, the lights have to stay on no matter what, and since uranium powers nuclear plants – which supply around 20% of America’s energy – there’s not a lot of room to lower that demand.It’s also worth mentioning that uranium has less of a speculative element than other commodities, like copper. Because of this, uranium is less vulnerable to a financial correction.Justin: What do you mean by that?Dave: I’m specifically referring to its price…With a highly liquid metal like copper, you get a lot of people speculating on it. A lot of people buy and sell paper futures on it. There’s a lot of that with gold, too. Even iron ore now has a lot of speculative trading. But uranium has very little speculative buying.Sure, there’s a uranium futures market. But it’s not a very big market. This is important because a lot of people will dump copper futures when there’s a financial crisis. That won’t happen with uranium. “Eye-opening” Big Surprise Coming for the White HouseWill this go down in history as THE moment that changed America – forever? At first, I didn’t think so. And you won’t either, I bet. But your mind will change in 60 seconds… once you see the stunning proof this millionaire and former hedge fund manager is releasing today. Recommended Link — — Justin: What about uranium stocks? Aren’t they some of the most speculative assets on the planet?Dave: Yes. Uranium exploration stocks have a huge speculative element.If the uranium price goes up, they can catch fire. Paladin, for example, went from one cent in 2003 to $9.57 in 2007. It was incredible… a 95,600% gain in less than four years.There was also a lot of speculation in physical uranium when the market picked up. A bunch of people created funds to buy physical uranium when uranium moved up from $20 to $40.But the uranium market has been depressed for so long that all of that speculation has evaporated.Of course, that could all come back if the market heats up again. And that would be great. It would help propel things higher.But we don’t have it right now. So we’re not going to see speculators dump uranium en masse if a financial crisis hits tomorrow.Justin: That’s interesting.I know a lot of people understand the upside potential of uranium. But few probably realize that it has a lot less downside than most commodities… particularly in the event of a major financial crisis.Dave: Correct. Speaking of uranium’s potential, we actually just wrote an entire issue on uranium in International Speculator. [Subscribers can access that issue here.]We believe that the nuclear industry has reached an inflection point. Just look at what’s happened recently.On March 22, Energy Secretary Rick Perry unveiled a $3.7 billion funding package to complete the last remaining nuclear plants under construction in the U.S. Commissioning is expected in 2021 and 2022, making these America’s first nuclear starts in 25 years.That’s big news. But an even bigger announcement came for nuclear, just a week later.On April 1, reports emerged that China is about to approve construction of new reactors. Papers quoted the head of China’s National Nuclear Safety Administration, Liu Hua, who said, “China will start building new nuclear projects this year.”This would be the first approval of new reactors in China in three years – and Liu’s comments suggest building is going to restart imminently.That’s great news for uranium producers, because China has been the biggest driver of global reactor buildouts this decade. In fact, Chinese-installed nuclear capacity has increased more than 20-fold since 1990.China’s reactor builds are the biggest factor affecting global uranium demand. Even with the slowdown in reactor construction recently, Chinese projects still account for 25% of the nuclear capacity being built worldwide.China has lots of nuclear projects it could choose to activate. Planned and proposed projects across the country would add 162,476 megawatts electric of capacity. That would triple China’s overall nuclear generation.And several recent moves from China’s uranium companies support a coming surge.So uranium is attractive from both fundamental and sentimental perspectives. For the longest time, “nuclear” was seen as a bad word. But it’s now being embraced, even seen as a solution by the climate change community. It’s quite interesting.Justin: Great stuff, Dave. Sounds like a big money-making opportunity. Thanks for sharing.Dave: My pleasure.Justin’s note: Dave says we’re about to witness the birth of a brand-new, $9.6 billion market.And today, you can get in on the ground floor.If his projections are correct, you’ll be able to turn a small stake into $50,000 – maybe more.In this short video, he explains everything you need to know about this opportunity… including how to position yourself for the biggest gains possible.For reasons you’ll soon discover, this opportunity won’t last long… So please pay close attention.Reader MailbagWill you be taking advantage of this money-making opportunity? Are you invested in commodities today? Let us know at feedback@caseyresearch.com.In Case You Missed It…You’re invited to spend time with your favorite investing masterminds in southern California… the only time this year that all of Casey Research’s gurus will be together on one stage…As a Dispatch reader, you’ve got an exclusive invitation to join us at the second annual Legacy Investment Summit on September 23-25.Join the smartest minds in finance – like the legendary Doug Casey, former hedge fund manager Teeka Tiwari, master trader Jeff Clark, and angel investor Jeff Brown – for their exclusive, in-person insights.And for a limited time, you can secure your tickets for hundreds less than everyone else will pay…last_img read more

A local motel general manager is facing two charge

first_imgA local motel general manager is facing two charges of human trafficking after being indicted by a Tuscaloosa County grand jury.Shirley Sparks, 65, is general manager of the Tuscaloosa LaQuinta Inn next to Interstate 20/59 on McFarland Boulevard. When she was taken into custody, she told reporters that she’d done nothing wrong, shouting “this isn’t true” and “I haven’t been part of anything like this.”BREAKING: Shirley Sparks, General Manager of LaQuinta Inn in Tuscaloosa, is being taken to jail in 2 counts of Human Trafficking. @wvua23 pic.twitter.com/2ihB6zxAxF— Chelsea Barton (@ChelseaBarton_) May 17, 2018However, officers with the Tuscaloosa Police Department said they have evidence that proves otherwise, and believe Sparks benefited financially while facilitating a three-year human trafficking ring run by a man named James Edward Warren from Jackson, Mississippi.Lt. Darren Beams with TPD said U.S. Marshals are searching for Warren, but Sparks’ arrest brings them one step closer to halting human trafficking in Tuscaloosa. Five human trafficking cases have come out of the LaQuinta Inn in less than a year, Beams said.The police department does offer free courses for those who work in hospitality services, giving employees a heads-up on what they should be on the lookout for when it comes to human trafficking, and what they should do if they suspect it’s happening where they work.If anyone is interested in those classes, they can call the Tuscaloosa Police Department at 205-349-2121.Shirley Sparks has been booked into the Tuscaloosa County Jail on $30,000 in bonds. She’s charged with two counts of human trafficking in the second degree. @wvua23 pic.twitter.com/VrU3DSsm8m— Chelsea Barton (@ChelseaBarton_) May 17, 2018last_img read more

New York Universitys School of Medicine is learni

first_imgNew York University’s School of Medicine is learning that no good deed goes unpunished.The highly ranked medical school announced with much fanfare this month that it is raising $600 million from private donors to eliminate tuition for all its students — even providing refunds to those currently enrolled. Before the announcement, annual tuition at the school was $55,018.NYU leaders hope the move will help address the increasing problem of student debt among young doctors, which many educators argue pushes students to enter higher-paying specialties instead of primary care, and deters some from becoming doctors in the first place.”A population as diverse as ours is best served by doctors from all walks of life, we believe, and aspiring physicians and surgeons should not be prevented from pursuing a career in medicine because of the prospect of overwhelming financial debt,” Dr. Robert Grossman, the dean of the medical school and CEO of NYU Langone Health, said in a statement released by the university. NYU declined a request to elaborate further on its plans.The announcement generated headlines and cheers from students. But not everyone thinks waiving tuition for all med students, including those who can afford to pay, is the best way to approach the complicated issue of student debt.”As I start rank-ordering the various charities I want to give to, the people who can pay for medical school in cash aren’t at the top of my list,” says Craig Garthwaite, a health economist at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management.”If you had to find some cause to put tons of money behind, this strikes me as an odd one,” says Dr. Aaron Carroll, a pediatrician and researcher at Indiana University.Still, medical education debt is a big issue in health care. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, which represents U.S. medical schools and academic health centers, 75 percent of graduating physicians in 2017 had student loan debt as they launched their careers, with a median tally of $192,000. Nearly half owed more than $200,000.But it is less clear how much of an impact that debt has on students’ choice of medical specialty. The AAMC’s data suggest debt does not play as big a role in specialty selection as some analysts claim.If debt were a huge factor, one would expect that doctors who owed the most would choose the highest-paying specialties. However, that’s not the case.”Debt doesn’t vary much across the specialties,” says Julie Fresne, AAMC’s director of student financial services and debt management.Garthwaite agrees. He says surveys in which young doctors claim debt as a reason for choosing a more lucrative specialty should be viewed with suspicion.”No one [who chooses a higher-paying job] says they did it because they want two Teslas,” he says. “They say they have all this debt.”Carroll questions how much difference even $200,000 in student debt makes to people who, at the lowest end of the medical spectrum, still stand to make six figures a year. “Doctors in general do just fine,” he says. “The idea we should pity physicians or worry about them strikes me as odd.”Choice of specialty is also influenced by more than money. Some specialties may bring less demanding lifestyles than primary care, or more prestige. Carroll says when he opted for pediatrics, his surgeon father was not impressed, calling it a “garbageman” specialty.There is also an array of government programs that help students afford medical school or that forgive student loans, although usually such programs require the new doctors to serve several years either in the military or in a medically underserved location. The federal National Health Service Corps, for example, provides scholarships and loan repayments to medical professionals who agree to work in mostly rural or inner-city areas that have a shortage of health care providers. And the Department of Education oversees the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, which cancels outstanding loan balances after 10 years for those who work for nonprofit employers.Medical schools themselves are addressing the student debt problem. Many — including NYU — have created programs that let students finish medical school in three years rather than four — reducing the cost by 25 percent. And the Cleveland Clinic, together with Case Western Reserve University, has a tuition-free medical school program aimed at training future medical researchers. It takes five years, but grants graduates with both a doctor of medicine title and a special research credential or master’s degree.This latest move by NYU, however, is part of a continuing race among top-tier medical schools to attract the best students — and possibly improve a school’s national rankings.In 2014, UCLA announced it would provide merit-based scholarships covering the entire cost of medical education (including not just tuition, but also living expenses) to 20 percent of its students. Columbia University announced a similar plan earlier this year, although unlike NYU and UCLA, Columbia’s program is based on a student’s financial need.These programs are funded, in whole or in part, by large donors whose names brand each medical school — entertainment mogul David Geffen at UCLA, former Merck CEO P. Roy Vagelos at Columbia, and Home Depot’s co-founder, Kenneth Langone, at NYU.Economist Garthwaite says it is all well and good if top medical schools want to compete for top students by offering discounts. But if their goal is to encourage more students to enter primary care or to steer more people from lower-income families into medicine, waiving everyone’s tuition “is not the most target-efficient way to reach that goal.”Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service, is an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, and is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Copyright 2018 Kaiser Health News. To see more, visit Kaiser Health News.last_img read more

The number of disabled people who are unemployed h

first_imgThe number of disabled people who are unemployed has risen for the second quarter in a row, according to new government figures.The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) used the publication of quarterly labour market statistics to point to the growth of 225, 000 in the number of disabled people in work, compared with the same period last year.But DWP failed to point out that the number of unemployed disabled people had also risen, from 399,000 in October to December 2014, to 401,000 the following quarter, and now to 423,000 in April to June 2015.The Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures also show a large rise in the last quarter in the number of sick and disabled people described as “economically inactive” – those not in work and neither seeking nor available to work – from 3,313,000 to 3,399,000, an increase of 2.6 per cent in just three months.One important factor pointed out by disabled activist Caroline Richardson, from the Spartacus online campaigning network, was that the ONS definition of employment includes those on unpaid work experience, as well as government-supported training and employment programmes.Richardson said: “Whilst there is a clear increase in the number of ill and disabled people working part-time since 1997, those in full-time employment is harder to identify.“The actual criteria for being counted as sick and disabled, and its impact on work, is now in line with the core definition of the 2010 Equality Act, and is for the purpose of data collection, self-reporting. The ONS is clear that the figures are therefore estimates.“To muddy the waters further, the definition of work has also been extended to include work experience and work-related training. “There does appear to be an increase in sick and disabled people moving into some type of work, but further analysis may show the work to be part-time, temporary or to be government-related training programmes.”The ONS said there were 2.08 million people who were not looking for work due to long-term sickness for April to June 2015, 75,000 more than for January to March 2015 and 86,000 more than the same period in 2014.For April to June 2015, there were 8.99 million people aged from 16 to 64 who were economically inactive.An ONS spokesman said it was not unusual for the number of people in employment and unemployment to rise at the same time, which could happen if large numbers of people moved into the labour market but did not secure jobs.But he said there was “no wider context we’re aware of for the effect you’ve noted”.He also stressed that the figures relating to disabled people had not been seasonally adjusted, so it was more difficult to see whether there were genuine trends.last_img read more

Pliable microbatteries for wearables

first_img Flexible batteries a highlight for smart dental aids In its development of batteries for wearables, Fraunhofer IZM combines new approaches and years of experience with a customer-tailored development process: “We work with companies to develop the right battery for them,” explains the graduate electrical engineer. The team consults closely with customers to draw up the energy requirements. They carefully adapt parameters such as shape, size, voltage, capacity and power and combined them to form a power supply concept. The team also carries out customer-specific tests.Smart plaster to measure sweatIn 2018, the institute began work on a new wearable technology, the smart plaster. Together with Swiss sensor manufacturer Xsensio, this EU-sponsored project aims to develop a plaster that can directly measure and analyze the patient’s sweat. This can then be used to draw conclusions about the patient’s general state of health. In any case, having a convenient, real-time analysis tool is the ideal way to better track and monitor healing processes. Fraunhofer IZM is responsible for developing the design concept and energy supply system for the sweat measurement sensors. The plan is to integrate sensors that are extremely flat, light and flexible. This will require the development of various new concepts. One idea, for instance, would be an encapsulation system made out of aluminum composite foil. The researchers also need to ensure they select materials that are inexpensive and easy to dispose of. After all, a plaster is a disposable product. Fabrication of micro batteries with side-by side electrodes on silicon wafer. Credit: Fraunhofer IZM Explore further Success through segmentationRobert Hahn, a researcher in Fraunhofer IZM’s department for RF & Smart Sensor Systems, explains why segmentation is the recipe for success: “If you make a battery extremely pliable, it will have very poor energy density – so it’s much better to adopt a segmented approach.”Instead of making the batteries extremely pliable at the cost of energy density and reliability, the institute turned its focus to designing very small and powerful batteries and optimized mounting technology. The batteries are pliable in between segments. In other words, the smart band is flexible while retaining a lot more power than other smart wristbands available on the market. Citation: Pliable micro-batteries for wearables (2018, October 1) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-pliable-micro-batteries-wearables.html In medicine, wearables are used to collect data without disturbing patients as they go about their daily business – to record long-term ECGs, for instance. Since the sensors are light, flexible and concealed in clothing, this is a convenient way to monitor a patient’s heartbeat. The technology also has more everyday applications – fitness bands, for instance, that measure joggers’ pulses while out running. There is huge growth potential in the wearables sector, which is expected to reach a market value of 72 billion euros by 2020.How to power these smart accessories poses a significant technical challenge. There are the technical considerations – durability and energy density – but also material requirements such as weight, flexibility and size, and these must be successfully combined. This is where Fraunhofer IZM comes in: experts at the institute have developed a prototype for a smart wristband that, quite literally, collects data first hand. The silicone band’s technical piece de resistance is its three gleaming green batteries. Boasting a capacity of 300 milliampere hours, these batteries are what supply the wristband with power. They can store energy of 1.1 watt hours and lose less than three percent of their charging capacity per year. With these parameters the new prototype has a much higher capacity than smart bands available at the market so far, enabling it to supply even demanding portable electronics with energy. The available capacity is actually sufficient to empower a conventional smart watch at no runtime loss. With these sorts of stats, the prototype beats established products such as smart watches, in which the battery is only built into the watch casing and not in the strap. There is a new technology gripping the markets of the future – technology to wear. Wearables, as they are known, are portable systems that contain sensors to collect measurement data from our bodies. Powering these sensors without wires calls for pliable batteries that can adapt to the specific material and deliver the power the system requires. Micro-batteries developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration IZM provide the technical foundation for this new technology trend. Mechanically flexible micro battery stripe made from segmented battery cells. Credit: Fraunhofer IZM Customer-tailored solutions Millimeter-sized lithium-ion batteries with interdigital electrodes. Credit: Fraunhofer IZM, Volker Mai Provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Two St Kilda greats call for the club to go after Luke

first_imgFormer Carlton coach Brett Ratten has been appointed as caretaker, and there is a strong possibility that he will be given the full time job come 2020.However, Thomas, who coached the Saints in 123 games, was adamant that the club should go hard after Beveridge.MORE: Richmond’s Jack Higgins hospitalised for bleeding on the brain”I tell you what, I would take Luke Beveridge (as Saints coach) for a decade,” Thomas told the Herald Sun.”I would do that … 100 per cent. (I’d say) ‘Here is a decade, Bevo, you are a St Kilda person, you understand the club. Your dad, Johnny, knows it back to front. You have grown up with it, you are the man, away you go’.”Then you can make the hard decisions. You are going to have to get rid of some guys, you are going to have to rebuild and maybe trade a few players out.”Just get it right.”If it (a contract extension with the Dogs) is not done, they (St Kilda) should make every post a winner to appoint him.”Beveridge played 45 games with the Saints during his career, and now coaches at the Dogs, where he led them to their 2016 Premiership success.Leigh Montagna, who played under Thomas at St. Kilda, was just as forthright that the club should go after Beveridge.”You’ve got to have a wish list don’t you? You’ve got to start at the top. And the names that we’ve thrown around are (Alastair) Clarkson, (John) Longmire, Ross Lyon. And I just suggested, why not Luke Beveridge?” Montagna said on Fox Sports’ AFL Tonight.”He’s in that basket of being a premiership coach, he’s got a bit of St Kilda blood.” Beveridge has not been offered a contract extension yet, but club president Peter Gordon told the Herald Sun that negotiations had begun.”I know he’s contracted and I’m sure everyone at the Western Bulldogs is happy to have him, but it was just that conversation around that you might as well have your wish list and start at the top and work your way down,” Montagna said.”Luke Beveridge, I rate really highly as a coach and he’s a premiership coach. He’s got the Dogs doing pretty good things lately, but you start at the top and work your way down and you end up getting the best available coach that you can get.” The Saints have begun their hunt for a new head coach following Alan Richardson resigning on Tuesday afternoon.center_img Former St. Kilda player greats Grant Thomas and Leigh Montagna have called for the club to do whatever it can to lure Western Bulldogs coach Luke Beveridge back to Moorabbin.last_img read more

Parag Milk to airlift premium milk brand to DelhiNCR

first_imgLeading private dairy company Parag Milk Foods Ltd expects its farm-to-home brand- Pride of Cows to touch the Rs 200 crore-mark in sales in the next 2-3 years. The company has expanded its distribution to Delhi-NCR.Sold on a subscription-model directly by the company, the premium milk will be airlifted from its dairy farm in Manchar, Pune to cater to the consumers in the Delhi-NCR. So far, the company has been selling the brand to about 34,000 households in Mumbai, Pune and Surat and it has also found traction among celebrities and HNIs.Devendra Shah, Chairman, Parag Milk Foods said, “With the aim to expand the brand’s presence, we have been focusing on increasing the production at our farm. Currently, we have over 3000 Holstien Freisan cows. We believe we have the capacity to cater to 15,000-20,000 households in the Delhi-NCR region in the next one year.”Initially to be made available in South Delhi and Gurgaon region, the company plans to roll out its “by-invitation” subscription model across the Delhi-NCR region in the next few months. “Currently, Pride of Cows is a Rs 80-crore brand. We expect it to grow to about Rs 180- Rs 200 crore in the next 2-3 years,” he said adding that Delhi-NCR is the largest milk market in the country.Priced at Rs 120 per litre in Delhi-NCR, consumers can subscribe to the premium milk on the company’s website or through its app. Shah said, “ In the first six months, we will airlift about 10,000 litres of premium milk from our farm. We only source the milk from our state-of-the-art dairy farm which is equipped with international technology for feeding, milking and processing of fresh milk. We hope to expand this to 20,000 litres in the next six months for the Delhi-NCR region.” To be priced at Rs 120 per litre COMMENT Devendra Shah, Chairman, Parag Milk Foods Ltd. File Photo   –  BusinessLine SHARE SHARE EMAIL Delhi January 17, 2019center_img COMMENTS Published on Parag Milk Foods Ltd SHARE dairy (product)last_img read more

Quake of magnitude 61 strikes north of Japans Okinawa USGS

first_img Related News SINGAPORE (Reuters) – An earthquake of magnitude 6.1 struck north of Japan’s islands of Okinawa on Saturday, the United States Geological Survey said. AdChoices广告There were no immediate reports of damage or casualties from the quake, which hit at a depth of 257 km (160 miles), about 346 km (215 miles) north of Naha, the capital of the prefecture. (Reporting and editing by Clarence Fernandez) World 07 Jul 2019 7.1 magnitude quake strikes in eastern Indonesia, tsunami warning issued World 24 Apr 2019 Magnitude 6.1 quake hits India’s Assam region – USGS World 09 Jul 2019 In Japan, the business of watching whales is far larger than hunting them Related News {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more

Sri Lankan Navy detains 6 Indian fishermen near Delft Island

first_imgSri Lankan Navy detains 6 Indian fishermen near Delft IslandThe Lankan Naval personnel were on a routine patroladvertisement Next Asian News International RameswaramJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 14:22 IST Photo: ANISri Lankan Navy apprehended six Indian fishermen from Namputhalai near Delft Island on Friday morning.The Lankan Naval personnel were on a routine patrol onboard a Fast Attack Craft attached to the Northern Naval Command.They apprehended one country boat with six fishermen for poaching in the Sri Lankan territorial waters.Straying of Indian and Sri Lankan fishermen into each others’ waters is a recurrent problem as territories on the sea are not clearly demarcated.Also read: 27 Indian fishermen arrested by Sri Lankan navyALSO WATCH| Sri Lankan Navy arrests 12 Indian fishermenFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byIram Ara Ibrahimlast_img read more